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Too large for Destination File System?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 lunchables

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 08:20 PM

I downloaded a 4GB .mkv file of a concert I wanted to watch. But since this was on my netbook, I tried to transfer the file to a 16GB Kingston USB Drive which is empty as I have bought it new. However I get an error saying that the "file is too large for the destination file system" and thus, cannot move my file to the USB. What is going wrong here?

Here's a picture of the popup that occurs.

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#2 ThunderZ

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:46 PM

How is Kingston drive formatted? I`m guessing fat or fat 32.

Edited by ThunderZ, 15 April 2011 - 10:47 PM.


#3 master131

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:11 AM

If it's formatted as FAT32 the maximum file size is 4GB. You can try splitting the file with something like HJSplit or converting your USB to NTFS (which is not recommended) to overcome the problem. When you want to play the file just copy it to the computer you want to play it on and join it with HJSplit.

#4 ThunderZ

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:20 AM

converting your USB to NTFS (which is not recommended)


Curious as to why you say that?
Other then read\write, recognition problems with older OS`s I see no reason not to format to NTFS. A bit simpler then having to split and rejoin files.

#5 Layback Bear

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 04:08 PM

I too don't understand NTFS not recommended. Can someone help on this. Why not recommended.

#6 master131

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:33 PM

Oh sorry, I must have zoned out. Converting to NTFS is fine. You can use an external utility (can't remember the name) or you can backup your USB and format it as an NTFS drive.




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