Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Can't remove an old hard drive without problems


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 TheHunter159

TheHunter159

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 08:44 AM

Hi

So.. yesterday I decided to remove an old hard drive which has nothing on it except some files which I don't need, the hard drive has 15GB, so it's completely useless.
I removed the power cable from the hard drive, removed everything and put it away, after I opened my computer it asked me to insert something called "boot drive" into the cd-rom.
I pressed enter several times just to see if it will do something, but it kept asking me to put some boot disk inside my computer, I've also tried to remove it using BIOS without removing the power cable from it, my windows (which is w7 64bit) is installed in another hard drive and the reason why I want to remove this old drive because 1: eats power, 2: I don't need it or use it.
Thanks =]

Edited by TheHunter159, 15 April 2011 - 08:45 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 09:56 AM

It sounds as though the bootloader for your Windows 7 installation was on this old hard drive you took out. This can happen if you have more than one hard drive plugged in when installing an OS.

Fortunately, it's an easy fix.

Just boot off your Windows 7 install disk (or a Repair disk if you made one) and choose the "Repair your computer" option. It should automatically detect your Windows 7 installation and attempt to repair any problems that were found (i.e. missing bootloader). You might have to reboot, choose the "Repair your computer" option again, and run Startup Repair manually to get it working.

You will likely find these tutorials helpful:
How to Boot to the System Recovery Options in Windows 7
How to Run a Startup Repair in Windows 7

If you have any problems or questions, don't hesitate to ask. :)
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#3 TheHunter159

TheHunter159
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 11:26 AM

Just to be sure :
Remove the power cable from the hard drive
enter Win7 64bit installation cd to the cdrom (it's also dvdrom but I don't think it matters)

my computer will ask for a repair I pick yes
should I do anything else?
and I shouldn't do anything in the BIOS menu or something?

I wanna be 100% sure that I am thinking of the correct things before attempting doing anything.

#4 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 12:38 PM

Yes, you will need to power down completely and unplug the extra hard drive before repairing your Windows 7 installation. Leave the hard drive with the Windows 7 install plugged in like normal.

Once you boot off the installation disc, you'll see a window with "Install Now" in the middle. Don't click "Install Now", but instead look for "Repair your computer" in the bottom left and click it.

You might have to change the boot device order in the BIOS to be able to boot off the install disc, or you may be able to hit a function key when you see the BIOS splash screen and do a one-time boot off a specific device (your optical drive, in this case...also known as CD-ROM or DVD-ROM). The function key that gets you to the boot menu can be anything from Esc to F12. It depends on the motherboard manufacturer. Usually there is some text telling you which to choose (example: "Press F10 for Boot Menu"). You might want to unplug both hard drives at first and practice accessing the boot menu (in case you miss it the first time, which you likely will) so you don't have to wait for Windows to finish booting before rebooting and trying again. If there are no viable boot devices plugged in (i.e. you unplug both hard drives) and you miss the boot menu, you'll just get an error message (and you can hit Ctrl+Alt+Del and try again).

Once you know the key that accesses the boot menu, leave only the hard drive with the Windows 7 install plugged in, boot off the installation disc, and do the previously mentioned Repair.

Sorry if that seemed like a lecture on booting, but I like to be perfectly clear when giving advice so there is no confusion. :)

Any more questions? Once again, if in doubt, ask first.

Also don't forget, you might have to do a Startup Repair a couple times, so don't worry if it doesn't work the first time.
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#5 TheHunter159

TheHunter159
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 02:40 PM

Ok, I've tried to this in the last maybe 1.5 hours
but the computer just tries to fix it again and again and I reached maybe more than 10 times of tries, I gave up and connected everything back
I thought it would take maybe 4-5 times but I reached 10 times and still same situation, what can be wrong?

#6 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 02:54 PM

Hmm...there is another possibility...

Okay, do this for me:

With both hard drives plugged in and with Windows booted, at the Start Menu, type diskmgmt.msc and hit Enter. Maximize the Disk Management window and take a screenshot (you can use the Snipping Tool for this...search for it at the Start Menu). Upload the screenshot to an image hosting site (I use http://imageshack.us) and post the link OR you can attach the screenshot to your next reply.
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#7 TheHunter159

TheHunter159
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 03:23 PM

I uploaded both to imageshack and added it using attachment
http://img834.imageshack.us/i/11459436.jpg/

Just to inform you I want to get rid of C, w7 is installed in D

Attached Files

  • Attached File  cd.JPG   161.51KB   7 downloads

Edited by TheHunter159, 15 April 2011 - 03:26 PM.


#8 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 07:40 PM

Aha, just as I suspected...you see under drive C where it says "System, Active, Primary Partition"?

System and Active should be on the drive with the rest of Windows 7 (D, which has Boot, Page File, etc. on it).

When installed correctly, all OS related stuff (System, Boot, etc.) will be on the same drive. In your case, the OS is spread out over two hard drives, hence why you cannot boot when you take out the C drive. As stated before, this can happen if you have more than one hard drive plugged in when installing an OS.

I would suggest a Repair Install with just your D drive plugged in...BUT, you have to be booted into Windows to do a Repair Install (which cannot happen at this point for you with just one hard drive, or else we wouldn't be in this predicament).

So, I give you a couple options:

1. I try to walk you through fixing the bootloader/MBR to get your current install working on the correct drive. No guarantees it will work, will likely be frustrating, might have to go with option 2 anyway.

2. You backup your data and do a clean install with just the one drive plugged in. Simple, painful, but guaranteed.

Either way, I hope you have a complete backup of everything.

So, what do you want to do? It's been a while since I've messed with MBR and bootloaders, but I can ask for help from my fellow staff members here at BC if need be.
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#9 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:38 PM

Okay, before we make a decision, I need a couple more screenshots from you.

Open your C: drive and take a screenshot showing the folders inside the C: drive. Same with the D: drive, I need to see the folders inside it. If there are any folder names you want to keep private, you can paint over them in the Snipping Tool, but I need to see as much as possible.

If you're clever in how you orient two Explorer windows (one with C:, the other with D:), you can get both drive contents in one shot.
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#10 TheHunter159

TheHunter159
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 16 April 2011 - 01:56 AM

Ok, so here is a screenshot of C drive (I didn't use snipping tool at all this time for full sized image)

http://img855.imageshack.us/i/19868325.png/

Screen shots of D drive :

http://img842.imageshack.us/i/85520932.png/

http://img689.imageshack.us/i/59339221.png/

I noticed that when my computer starts up is says "Press any key to boot from cd or drive" but I didn't click anything and waited for it to go on, should I click to see if I can boot from other drive?

Well, I can backup the stuff that are important to dvds/cds
But will I have to format E too?
I pick option 1 first if you think it might work, I also need to know if I'll need to backup E for either option 1 or 2
If I don't have to backup E, can I move everything I need from D to E without risking in losing any data from E?

Edited by TheHunter159, 16 April 2011 - 02:28 AM.


#11 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 16 April 2011 - 03:04 PM

Okay, I've talked it over with some of the staff, and you're best option at this point is to just backup your stuff and do a clean install with a full format (with only the 500GB drive plugged in).

Like you said, it would be a great idea to backup your stuff to the E drive while you reinstall W7 on the big drive. You can add E (or others) back later as secondary drive(s). That's perfectly fine.

The important thing is to only have one hard drive plugged in when you install, and be sure to format the drive before installing Windows (to wipe away all the previous installs you've done).

So, backup to E, remove all drives except D (the 500GB one), boot off install disc, delete all partitions on the hard drive (might not be referred to as D at this point), make a new partition, and continue with installation.

Are you comfortable with that?

Edited by keyboardNinja, 16 April 2011 - 03:04 PM.

PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#12 TheHunter159

TheHunter159
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 16 April 2011 - 03:48 PM

Yes I agree to this, finally I may get rid of the 30 seconds waiting each time I open the computer

So as I understood E is completely safe which means I don't need to format it at all and I can move stuff from D to E to backup what I want
I didn't quite understand what to do with D and C in order to totally format them

Damn I won't be able to backup my Steam game files for sure, 100GB xD

#13 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • Members
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:11:10 AM

Posted 16 April 2011 - 04:44 PM

So as I understood E is completely safe which means I don't need to format it at all and I can move stuff from D to E to backup what I want

Yes, backup your stuff to E and then shutdown and unplug it. It will not be involved with reinstalling Windows. It's just holding your data for now.

I didn't quite understand what to do with D and C in order to totally format them

When you're ready to install, remove the C drive (as well as E), leave ONLY D plugged in (the 500GB one). Change the 500GB drive to the primary drive in the BIOS. Boot off your installation disc, click Install Now > choose the Custom (advanced) option > select the first partition and click Drive options (advanced) > click Delete. Do this for all partitions until there is only one "unallocated space" left. Click New > Apply > OK > Next. Installation should continue. Make sure the hard drive is set as the first boot device in the BIOS after the first reboot.

Once Windows is installed, shutdown and plug the former C drive in. Make sure it is set as a slave drive in the BIOS and that the big hard drive is still set as the primary. Windows should boot off the 500GB drive normally. From inside Windows, you can format the 14.33GB drive (it won't be called C anymore).

Make sense? I know it's a lot if you don't deal with this stuff much, but if you follow those directions exactly, you should be okay.

As far as your Steam games, do you happen to have a large external hard drive? You should backup anything you'll want later that's on D right now, because it will all go away for good once you format/reinstall.
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#14 TheHunter159

TheHunter159
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:10 PM

Posted 16 April 2011 - 05:13 PM

I don't know how it's called in English, but yeah I got a 500GB "floppy" hard drive which connects with USB.
So I will use it to backup everything I need
also I have a cable like this,: (looks like paper) http://www.dancetech.com/aa_dt_new/articles/athlon_2400_build/athlon_2400_build_drive_+_cd_cable_id.jpg (random picture)
mine is in color blue, connected to C (just like in the picture) do I need to switch it to D hard drive?
or should I disconnect it from C and leave it alone?

Edited by TheHunter159, 16 April 2011 - 05:14 PM.


#15 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 16 April 2011 - 11:21 PM

Please perform the following, so that we can get the exact specs of your computer. This will better assist us in helping you more.

Publish a Snapshot using Speccy

The below is for those who cannot get online

Please take caution when attaching a text file to your post if you cannot copy/paste the link to your post, you will need to edit it to make sure that your Windows Key is not present.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users