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network driver issues


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#1 Beth102

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 08:22 PM

OK did clean install of windows xp media center 2005. 2 months ago had new network adapter installed and they did not give me copy of the driver. Device name is D Link DGE-530T gigabit ethernet adapter. I found it online from D Link, unzipped it and managed to install it...message said installed successfully. But it won't work for some reason. I went in to menus...around network connection and device and don't remember everything I did. Now interestingly when installing the driver computer brought up 2 other D Link devices which must have been saved in the computer. I did not try to install those message said Windows can't confirm them but it gave me same message for the new one as well as old one.

One big problem was I had toreboot computer and when I did a different login screen came up said HP_Administrator login and when I put in password it did NOT work. I got into another menu I don't remember what it was called...where I was able to run login and I was able to get windows to open. I am at a loss for what I might have done.

Anybody who knows XP who could help me. Also do you think the D Link drivers that came up automatically might be the correct ones even though the name is not exact...why would they be in my computer. I did have driver for this device installed twice, first by computer store and 2nd time by micro center who guessed by using a cd with thousands of drivers on it maybe i should have just installed one of those?

I am worried about password situation that I may not be able to log on next time i reboot.

i have to get online to get windows updates again and update all anti virus anti spy software.

typing on netbook is not easy, not familiar with windows 7 yet, and wireless not yet set up properly on netbook and don't want to do that till xp machine is online. Help!

Thanks

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#2 Eyesee

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 11:53 AM

Are these the drivers that you installed?
In the beginning there was the command line.

#3 Beth102

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 12:13 AM

yes D-Lin DGE-530T gigabit Ethernet Adapter rev B that is all I have on it. Originally internet went on and off. Went to store they said working fine but installed new network card only $15 since I paid $85 for them just to look. Note Verizon said it was Network card stores say it is not network card. Both network cards work fine in computer store..original network card works fine in 2 stores but not at home...new Network card worked when I took computer home...had to re-install operating system 3 times due to bugs. 2nd time D-Link network card worked fine then didn't work and guy at computer store re-installed it from DVD of thousands of drivers. A day later I had to wipe system again got driver from internet installed it it would not work. Went to Microcenter they said I installed it fine. I bought a NetGear router RangeMax Wireless N Gigabit Router. Verizon had installed Westell Versa Link 327W a few years back. Next step will be read about it maybe call Verizon and decide whether I can install this myself or if I need someone to install this and how does it change Verizon plan I have if I use my own router; also, do I need to connect this router to Verizon equipment or can I plug this NetGear right into phone line. I HATE calling Verizon often having to talk to some RUDE person in India who I can hardly hear....etc. etc.

Edited by Beth102, 04 April 2011 - 12:20 AM.


#4 Beth102

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 12:23 AM

Also I have an ASUS Notebook I am writing from. I did not set up wireless just got online have it in protection mode. I do NOT want both computers to be connected in that if one gets a bug the other gets the bug I want them to be protected from each other.

#5 StartingOver

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 09:35 AM

I don't know if this may be applicable to your situation but, I had a problem with D-Link that, quite frankly, surprised the heck out of me. Within the last 6 weeks, I decided to buy a new router for my home network. I had been running a Trendnet wireless router (el cheapo, but it worked OK at the time). But, since I need a considerably higher signal strength, I went to Fry's Electronics in Houston, TX and purchased a decent D-Link router off the shelf. When I got home and tried to install, everything went, as my kids like to say, "Wonky"!

After several phone calls to D-Link for help that night, D-Link finally informed me that the unit I purchased locally did not belong on the shelves in the North America!!! The particular router I purchased was meant to be sold only in Malaysia. When I returned it to Fry's and got a different model, I found out that Fry's and D-Link KNEW ABOUT THIS ISSUE and had been getting complaints for a while! Of course, I was told by Fry's that "We're aware of the issue and we're working on it." But, when I left with a new router (which I confirmed would work!), there were still several boxes of the Malaysia router on the shelves.

So, it's a wierd thing to check out but, ask D-Link if the network adapter you purchased is supposed to be sold in your area (or even your part of the world!).

Finally, I run several computers on my network at home. I have the D-Link router installed after my DSL modem. From there I got rid of all of the old internal wireless network cards and the related software, then switched all of my desktops to Wireless-N USB Network Adapters. Cost me about $50.00 per computer for a decent Wireless-N USB adapter but it was well worth it. I've had no trouble since.

Hope this helps!
StartingOver
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#6 Beth102

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:27 AM

Thanks.Well it turns out the D LinK network card is installed OK. I am getting a new modem/router from Verizon in 2 days. I did NOT need the NetGear wireless router and there was no connection for the phone card. I suppose I could have picked up a wireless adapter for USB, but maybe it's OK using the modem/router...which will be an updated Westel. I don't know much about this stuff but isn't the wired connection a faster one?

I am concerned about how to have the 2 computers because I have had problems with my desktop and wiped the computer off 3 times in 2 weeks due to bugs. Right now I am on wireless to my wireless but it is not set up and I have computer on protected mode. I am going to wait before I set up wireless connection because I have had so many problems with trojans etc that I want to make sure that is all gone and I think I want to keep my Netbook separate from my desk top so that if I get another infection I still have one working computer. If I get trojans in two computers I will truly go insane. How do I protect each computer and make sure one cannot infect the other or is that not possible?

I think it is CRAZY they are selling a router that is supposed to be sold in Malaysia and continuing to sell it while customers are complaining. Well that IT guy told me to install Netgear Router that doesn't have plug for the phone...maybe I am doing things old school not having the wireless adapter...There are too many cords on the floor though. Computers are so complicated and repair people and salespeople do NOT always stir you in the right direction.

#7 StartingOver

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 10:18 AM

My first advice is to keep working with the people on this site. It is one of the best places to learn I've ever found on the internet. The pro's here (and, I'm NOT one of the pro's!) will guide you through whatever you are trying to set up. Just be patient. Since it's all volunteer, your answers may not arrive as quickly as you may like but, you can be sure that you will rarely be misled from the members on BC.

As far as setting up a relatively safe wireless network in your home, it's really not as complicated as it may seem. What I have learned it to spend a little extra money on my wireless router and my wireless network adapters. I am connected to the internet via DSL. Mine is provided by AT&T in my area. It is a high-speed DSL but, it is not U-Verse. So, what I have is a DSL filter (adapter) which has two outlet ports on one end and a standard phone plug on the other. That's plugged into my standard phone jack on my wall. Your DSL service provider will send some of these filters out with their router. You can also buy them from almost any electronics store. One of the two ports accepts a standard phone cord which is then plugged into a DSL modem/router. The other outlet is for pluggging in a standart telephone (or fax machine, etc). You will then need a similar filter which has only one outlet port for each phone jack in the house that is being used by a phone, fax machine, answering machine, etc.

I did not like the modem/wireless routers provided by AT&T with their service (at $4.00/month!) so, I went to Fry's and bought a standard Motorola DSL modem for about $50.00. It is not wireless. It's just a modem. It has a standard phone jack on the back to accept the other end of the phone cord coming from the filter attached to the wall jack. It also has a USB port and an ethernet port (it accepts an RJ-45 plug that looks like a big standrd phone connection) on the back. I plugged one end of an ethernet cord (bought at WalMart or Home Depot, I think. They're sold everywhere in varying lengths) into the ethernet connection on the back of the modem and the other end into the Input port on the back of a good wireless router (once I had the right router!). The key is to buy a good wireless router. Some people like Linksys (by Cisco). Others like D-Link. There are plenty of others. You'll spend about $75.00 or more on this router, depending on features.

Here's the important part for me. If you can afford it, get a Wireless-N300 Dual Channel router. At minimum, be sure you get a Wireless-N300 router. (Again, watch the brand name! If it's only $29.95 when the supposedly comparable D-Link or Linksys is over $70, there's a reason!) Then, make sure your internal wireless cards in all of your computers are Wireless-N300 or better. The older internal cards are wireles-G (or wireless-B for even older stuff). The security of your network depends greatly on the type of security these devices allow you to use! As long as all of your wireless adapters (whether USB or internal) and your wireless router are Wireless-N300 or better, the security features your network will support will be technologically current.

Internal wireless cards are going the way of the dinosaur for desktop computers. Wireless USB adapters are the most common adapters for desktops now. They are also more convenient, at least for me. If your desktop system is sitting down low in the cubby-hole of a computer desk (the one made to get your CPU tower out of your way) and you use an internal wireless card, then the antenna sticking out of the back of your system is not in a good location to pick up a signal. You can spend money on high-gain antennas for your wireless card which will help, but ONLY if your wireless card has an interchangable antenna. With a decent Wireless-N300 USB adapter, you will plug a cord into a USB port on the back (or front) of your system and the antenna can sit on top of your desk. Some can even be wall-mounted above your desk. Your connections strength becomes much better.

As far as your security goes, Wireless-N 300 supports WPA2 level security. I don't know what it stands for. I just know, and I'm going on what I've been told and what little reading I've done 'cause I'm certainly no expert, it's currently the strongest wireless security. When you install your wireless router on your computer (pick one desktop to install it on), you will need to name your network or you can accept the default name that the router firmware suggests. For security reasons, I made up a random name that is not even a word for my network. That way, anyone within range who picks up the signal doesn't see a name that may give a clue as to the owner of the network. That name is called an SSID (again, don't know what it stands for). That is the name the router broadcasts to say "hey, I'm an available wireless network". The most important part of the set-up is to select the WPA2 level security a create a strong password. Here is the place I went crazy. This is my access point to my home computers and my business computers! Forget about 6 & 8 character, easy to remember passwords. Make it long, make it random, write it down and DON'T LOSE IT! A strong password (called a passphrase) for a WPA2 protected wireless network will look something like this:

mhZ&9714Rp@23%YWBsq#16

Up to 22 characters is not a bad idea. Intersperse with capital letters and symbols just like you see above. Don't worry abut remembering the thing. You should only have to use it again if your network goes completely down and your router resets. Hasn't happened to me yet. As far as setting up your other computers, have a flash drive handy when you install your wireless router on your desktop computer and your router will create a wireless setup file to load onto your other computers.

Bottom line: Buy decent, CURRENT router and adapters, read and follow the instructions and you will have a secure wireless network for your home.

Good Luck!
StartingOver!
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