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Old Hard Drive. New Computer


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10 replies to this topic

#1 rhamton

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 08:25 PM

Can anyone guide me in the right direction on how to put my 1 year old 80 gig western digital HD with windows 98se installed into my new computer? New one has xp home on it. I don't need the 98 stuff, but I do want my songs and stuff and the storage space too.

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#2 mjc

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 09:55 PM

Install as a slave drive.

#3 rhamton

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 09:57 PM

Just set the jumpers and go?

#4 mjc

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 10:15 PM

set jumpers, look in my computer open the path to my documents/my music. If your old system still functions and you can patch them together then you can use the files and settings transfer wizard. Otherwise I think you need to fish for your data, I 've tried to use the f&s transfer wizard on a slave drive in similar circumstances and ended up doing what I suggested. :thumbsup:

#5 rhamton

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 10:19 PM

Thanx for the info. Any Ideas on a site to go and read up on similar situations. See my new HD is only a 40 gig. I went with the 40 because I new my 80 is in fine shape with only 25% used up so I took a break on the price of the smaller HD so I could get a LCD flat panel monitor.

Edited by rhamton, 27 December 2005 - 10:25 PM.


#6 mjc

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 10:26 PM

Microsoft home ?

#7 acklan

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 10:12 AM

Is you XP partition FAT32 or NTFS?
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#8 rhamton

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 07:30 AM

c: (NTFS on drive 0) 31.94 GB 23.56 GB free
d: (FAT32 on drive 0) 8.05 GB 2.32 GB free

#9 Rimmer

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 08:04 PM

Is the second drive connected to the same IDE cable as the hard drive in the new system?

There are two different ways of setting up the two hard drives on an IDE channel sharing the same cable:

The original way used a 40 pin cable and the drives were jumpered as Master (MA) and Slave (SL). It does not matter which connector you use.
Faster IDE interfaces use an 80 pin cable and the drives can be jumpered either as MA and SL or both as Cable Select (CS). On this type of cable the Master drive must plug into the (black) end connector and the Slave drive plugs into the middle connector (grey).

You need to identify your IDE cable as 40 wire or 80 wire (Normally the 80 wire has different coloured connectors). If you have a 40 wire connector you must use the Master/Slave settings. If you have an 80 wire cable you can use either Cable Select settings on both drives, or the Master/Slave settings.

Once the drive is connected correctly you must set the BIOS to detect it. Exact commands depend on what BIOS version you have - the easiest way is to set Primary Slave, Secondary Master and Secondary Slave to AUTO (Primary Master will already be set correctly because that's what your system boots off now.)

Note inserting a second hard drive will 'bump' your CDROM/DVD drive(s) down a letter (actually one letter for each partition on the second drive) so if your CDROM was originally "E:" it will now probably be "F:". This can causde a problem for some software and you may want to use the Drive Manager in XP to set the CDROM back to its original letter.

hth :thumbsup:

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#10 rhamton

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 06:04 PM

Well all is running fine. Any tips on getting the best functionalilty out of both drives

#11 Rimmer

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 09:57 PM

Best functionality? That's more determined by the drive design rather than anything you could change but you can do this:

1. Enable SMART in the BIOS for both drives (if available) - this will generate drive activity statistics that can give you advanced warning of problems. You can view the stats using a diagnostic like Everest.
2. Enable DMA transfers if your motherboard supports it. Go to the Control Panel >> System click the 'Hardware' tab then 'DeviceManager'. Click the plus beside 'IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller' Double click on the 'Primary channel' to bring up its properties. DMA capability is under the 'Advanced' tab. Repeat for the 'Secondary channel'.
3. Run error checking and defragmantation regularly from Safe Mode. Here's a blurb:

Do some basic maintenance:
  • Clean your internet cache and temporary files:
    Click Start and Run then type in cleanmgr this will start the windows disk cleanup tool.
    Tick the boxes beside Temporary internet Files, Recycle Bin and Temporary Files then click OK

  • Schedule an Error Check (Scandisk).
    How to find scandisk: Start>My Computer. Right click the C: drive then Properties>Tools tab, click on Check Now. In the window that opens tick 'Automatically fix file system errors' and 'Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors'. When you click 'Start' Windows will say the error checker cannot run now and do you want it to run at the next boot? Click 'yes' and then reboot.

  • When that's finished reboot in Safe Mode and do a defrag.
    If you are not sure how to boot in Safe Mode there is a tutorial here: Safe Mode
    Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Defragmenter
    They will take some time but at least you will know your hard drive is working correctly and tidied up.
4. Download a manufacturers diagnostic from Leurgy's compendium of Hard Drive diagnostics:
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/28744/hard-drive-installation-and-diagnostic-tools/
Run it once in a while.

:thumbsup:

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