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Removing a case fan


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#1 rhino1366

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 06:34 PM

What do I need to know if I'll try to remove a case fan on my own (rear fan)?

It's a 120mm fan on back.

What special connector(s) I'll need to unplug?.. anything other?

Thanks. :)

Edit:

The thing is that it drives additional dust inside (CPU has boxed fan, video-card is HD 5750).

Edited by rhino1366, 24 March 2011 - 06:35 PM.


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#2 killerx525

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 12:31 AM

You need to unscrew all the screws out so it can be taken off then you would have to unplug the 3 pin or pin connector unless you it is connected to a 4 pin molex.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#3 Baltboy

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 08:35 AM

Unless that fan is not working you should not remove it. It pulls the hot air out of the case which helps keep the memory, motherboard and other system components cool.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#4 rhino1366

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 08:36 AM

Thanks for reply, killerx525. :)

That easy! Okay, I hope I won't damage something.

#5 hamluis

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 09:17 AM

As stated...rear fans should be exhaust...they don't bring anything in, if properly mounted.

Louis

#6 rhino1366

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 12:04 PM

Let me disagree...

That 120mm rear exhaust fan sucks all the dust inside from the front of a chassis.
Chassis' front panel is all dusty. :(

Edit:

Anyway, does these components need a chassis fan? ...

AMD Athlon II X2 250, 3.0 GHz Dual-Core (boxed cooler)
GA-MA78GM-US2H rev. 1.0
2x2 GB DDR2-800 CL6
AMD/ATI Radeon HD 5750 1 GB, original
One 7200RPM modern HDD
One 20x modern DVD+/-RW
...PSU is 450W

:huh:

Edited by rhino1366, 25 March 2011 - 12:11 PM.


#7 Baltboy

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 12:12 PM

And without it you run the risk of overheating. If you remove it there is a good chance you will srart having errors related to overheating. If you are lucky none of your parts will be damaged.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#8 killerx525

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 04:43 PM

It could be the fan was put in the wrong way.

Edited by killerx525, 25 March 2011 - 04:44 PM.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#9 rhino1366

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:23 PM

Wind is taken from chassis' front through it to rear... what is wrong?
...so the front gets a bit dusty all the time.

Edit:

What's the best bet, between non-overheating and dust-free?

Edited by rhino1366, 25 March 2011 - 05:27 PM.


#10 Baltboy

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:29 PM

add some kind of filter media in the front of the case to catch the dust before it gets inside. My case actually comes with a filter at the front intake fan which greatly reduces the dust inside the case.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#11 Crazy49er

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:10 PM

You want the case to have a sort of Wind Tunnel effect pulling in cool air (usually from the front) and spewing out warmer air (usually towards the rear and sides) ... the reason you'll see it like this is because of simple thermal science. Hot air Rises, Cool air falls. Therefore-Ergo cool air in from the bottom, and hot air out from the top.

You do have to have some kind of cooling option in the case or with the heat the computer will slow down and most likely die of heat stroke. Dust is equally as bad in causing parts to overheat but that is a problem you wont notice till its too late a year or two down the line.

You do have options for both however. They make dust screens that can be fitted over the fans or case vents to block much of the dust from getting in. Not all... but most. If you're having a problem with the fan there are options for liquid cooling, or different sizes and levels of quietness for fans.

Also yes the first 4 on your list of components most certainly need to be cooled as much as possible. The processor will have its own fan and heat sink but you have to realize it cant suck cool air in and remove heat without an outside source of air.



You can try also different placement for the computer, if you're on carpet simply lifting the CPU off the ground or up onto the desk for hopefully cleaner air. I think however the problem would be best fixed with some dust filters

#12 hamluis

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:41 PM

How about...simply removing the case cover from time to time...and simply blowing it out with canned air?

I don't even put my case doors on my two systems and they never overheat or have problems from the dust...because I routinely use canned air to eliminate dust buildup which could result in overheating.

Without proper air circulation via a case fan, you are asking for problems, IMO.

Louis

#13 killerx525

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 01:40 AM

The case opened isn't a bad idea but the OP might not have time to clean it out.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#14 rhino1366

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:21 AM

So, the fan isn't unnecessary. Hmm...

Edited by rhino1366, 27 March 2011 - 06:28 AM.


#15 Platypus

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:34 AM

There's no need to remove the fan in order to discover how necessary it is - just disconnect its power lead. The temperature can be monitored (in the BIOS for CPU and chassis temperature, or software like SpeedFan or similar can also report GPU) and compared with the readings with the fan connected. The fan must improve cooling, how much you can find out from temperatures. And even without it, dust will still be drawn in by the other air circulation (PSU) so an intake filter is still a good idea.

Edited by Platypus, 27 March 2011 - 06:36 AM.

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