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9 replies to this topic

#1 jckbredwards

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 11:08 AM

Computer was on and working fine. Had a power surge (I do have a surge protector) and computer shut down. Upon re-start I get the BIOS page and then a black screen with info/warnings about what to do if the computer was powered off suddenly etc. The keyboard and mouse are unresponsive and I cannot make any selection (i.e. start up with last known working set up or start in safe mode. So the timer counts down to the pre-selected "Start windows normally" and then I get a loading bar across the bottom of the screen and then just a black screen. It just stays there (no noises-good or bad- from the case, no whirring, purring screaming etc.) After a while I powered off and tried it again. Exact same result three times in a row so I figured something is not right. My modem has all lights on and my router is all lit up. I disconnected two external hard drives before I initially re-started and have left them disconnected. Running windows xp (SP3), 500 watt power supply unit, 2gb RAM, 2.6mghz intel processor, forget what type of video card but it is decent (I think geforce?) I was able to run call of duty, half life 2 stuff like that. Not a high end machine but very serviceable. No new installations, programs or viruses. Had been running fine. I've reviewed some of the stuff in the forums and seen things close but didn't know what steps to take first? Don't have the recovery console installed. Any clues? Thanks in advance.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 01:14 PM

System manufacturer and model?

Louis

#3 jckbredwards

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 03:59 PM

It is essentially a hand made computer made by a local computer store where we knew the owner/operator. I can probably find out some parts manufacturer. We've had this for at least 6 years and I've upgraded the RAM and the video card, added usb ports. The motherboard is a PCI type and it pretty much maxed out. If you need something specific let me know and I'll see what I can find out. Thanks for the prompt response.

#4 hamluis

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 05:28 PM

If you have an XP CD...insert it, change the boot options in the BIOS.

Then try to run the chkdsk /r command from the Recovery Console on the CD.

Insert the Windows XP CD into your CD drive and restart your computer.

When the text-based part of Setup begins, follow the prompts. Select the repair option by pressing R.

Next screen, type 1 and hit Enter.

On password line, just hit Enter.

At the next line, type chkdsk /r and hit Enter.

Louis

#5 jckbredwards

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 05:38 PM

Sorry, what do you mean change the boot options? How is that done? Also, I do not have recovery console installed (as far as I know). Are you saying it is on the disc and I should start from there? How do you I find out if I have that. Thanks again. I do believe I have the windows xp recovery disc. I know I have a legit, authorized windows installation.

#6 jckbredwards

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 11:04 PM

I lef tthis morning to go to work and when I came home for lunch it was on. Everything looked fine and everything works. I have no idea but now it works. How do I get to check disk to run that to see if there are any damaged sectors? I guess this is considered closed.

#7 westom

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 02:24 AM

I lef tthis morning to go to work and when I came home for lunch it was on. Everything looked fine and everything works

First learn from the experience. Never change or disconnect anything until all facts are first collected. Those various lights can report a failure. But will not report anything as good. Understand the world is not binary. It is ternary.

Now, move on to discover what has failed. For example, computers record failures in the system (event) logs. Then work around the problem. Leave you to discover and deal with the failure later. But you must first view those logs.

Device Manager may report any hardware defects. Are any listed?

Better computer manufacturers provide comprehensive hardware diagnostics so that failures are found without complications. Yours would not have them. So any future failures are uncovered by executing component manufacturer or third party diagnostics one painful diagnostic at a time.

Some of these diagnostics are also available from by bootdisk.com. Best to execute and learn them while the computer is still working. Your intermittent failure is best a warning that you did not yet learn what you must know to solve hardware problems. That means never changing anything until the facts are first learned. And in your case, to discover if problems exist (that may be worse with age).

Well, I only read your post once. That means most of it was not yet grasped. However, you should know the computerís power controller has safety lockout features. Normally these must be reset by literally yanking the power cord from a wall receptacle. Those lockout safety functions could explain confusion.

#8 hamluis

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:44 AM

Since your system boots...

Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter.

Type Y in new screen and hit Enter.

Reboot the system. The chkdsk /r command will attempt to run before booting into XP.

FWIW: It is not uncommon for hard shutdowns to damage system files...running the chkdsk /r command will attempt to put things back in order.

Louis

#9 westom

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 07:53 PM

FWIW: It is not uncommon for hard shutdowns to damage system files...running the chkdsk /r command will attempt to put things back in order.

Also common for chkdsk to create more damage IF the problem is not first identified; before fixing anything.

If a system boots, then those above important facts are available. And is where solutions start. Those who actually know how computers work can post only if facts are first provided. Due to near zero information, those who best know computers can say nothing. No hard facts is why some can only post "try this" or "could be that". Also called wild speculation.

Replies are only as good as the information first provided. Executing Chkdsk can also create even more damage. But those with least experience want to fix something before first learning what has failed. An example of what causes confusion and wasted labor: "Work harder; not smarter".

Listed was minimum information necessary so that a few who know so much more can contribute.

Edited by westom, 10 March 2011 - 07:55 PM.


#10 dc3

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 12:11 AM

Also common for chkdsk to create more damage IF the problem is not first identified; before fixing anything.


These problems are usually associated with computers that are pre-set to run chkdsk.

If your computer is improperly shutdown due to a power failure, system crash or human error, the pre-set CHKDSK might launch itself automatically to scan for a hard drive error responsible for the problem. If this happens, the system can get stuck in a loop of identifying and re-initiating the error.


Common CHKDSK Errors

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