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article mainly about ubuntu netbooks


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#1 who here is a guru?

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 07:54 PM

hi there. this article has got me excited. however it was written 3/11/2009, so almost 2 years ago and that concerns me. would someone mind going through it and pointing out stuff that's outdated?

http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/osrc/article.php/12068_3809736_1/Outfit-Your-Netbook-With-Open-Source-21-Tools.htm

the below is found in the article:
os: ubuntu
browser: firefox
anti-virus: clamav
anti-spam: spamassassin
firewall: firestarter
password protection: keepass password safe
email client: thunderbird
document management: inforama
im: pidgin
file transfer: filezilla
Office Suite: OpenOffice.org
pdf reader: sumatra
PDF Creator: PDF Creator
Compression Utility: 7-Zip
Audio Editor: Audacity
Music Player and Manager: aTunes
Video player: VLC Media Player
Graphics Editing: Inkscape

i interpret the above as the author's recommendations. i appreciate your help.

whiagin1

Edited by who here is a guru?, 08 March 2011 - 08:02 PM.


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#2 Andrew

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 06:58 AM

os: ubuntu: Yes, of course
browser: firefox Still my pick
anti-virus: clamav Not needed
anti-spam: spamassassin Only if you're running an e-mail server.
firewall: firestarter I prefer Uncomplicated Firewall (UFW) but I hear good things about Firestarter
password protection: keepass password safe I hear good things, but I haven't used it
email client: thunderbird I use this, very good
document management: inforama I've never used this, or needed anything like this. You might, depending on your needs.
im: pidgin Meh. I only use IRC so I use Konversation.
file transfer: filezilla Still the best!
Office Suite: OpenOffice.org I prefer LibreOffice, the recently split version of OpenOffice that isn't shackled by a single corporation.
pdf reader: sumatra Ubuntu's built-in PDF reader is fine for most purposes
PDF Creator: PDF Creator No opinion
Compression Utility: 7-Zip Ubuntu's built in compression tools are adequate, though 7-Zip is certainly an excellent program
Audio Editor: Audacity Best that I know of
Music Player and Manager: aTunes Amarok 1.4... but it's a matter of personal tastes
Video player: VLC Media Player The best!
Graphics Editing: Inkscape no opinion

#3 who here is a guru?

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 08:53 AM

thank you. i've seen the term 'libreoffice' alongside openoffice but silly me assumed it was simply the spanish version of the latter. i now have something new to research. anyway, wish me luck in finding a good guru who won't take me to the cleaners

Edited by who here is a guru?, 09 March 2011 - 08:55 AM.


#4 Romeo29

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 01:27 PM

I am not a guru but I have 5 cents if you want them :)

Anti-virus : BitDefender for Unices (free editon). You can scan Windows hard disk using this :P
Graphics : GIMP for raster graphics. Inkscape for vector.

#5 Capn Easy

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 08:31 PM

Something that I use my netbook for a lot these days that I never thought of 2 years ago is converting and, to a degree, reading ebooks. If you think you might be interested in this, get a copy of Calibre -- a program that converts between various ebook formats (like PRC, EPUB, etc.) and allows those formats to be read on the netbook or easily copied to an ereader.

Even if you don't think you'll be getting an ereader, there are a ton of free and legal books available from Project Gutenberg (Classics, etc. -- beautifully formatted by volunteers), Baen publishing (modern Science Fiction), etc.

(NOTE: Calibre is available at no cost, but I don't know that it's open source.)

Edited by Capn Easy, 09 March 2011 - 08:32 PM.


#6 buddy215

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 09:29 PM

Capn Easy.....Calibre can be installed directly from Ubuntu Software Center. (Gonna give it a try....Thanks)

License: Open Source
From Calibre's website: calibre - E-book management
calibre is a free and open source e-book library management application developed by users of e-books for users of e-books. It has a cornucopia of features divided into the following main categories:
  • Library Management calibre manages your e-book collection for you. It is designed around the concept of the logical book, i.e., a single entry in your library that may correspond to actual e-book files in several formats.

    calibre can sort the books in your library by: Title, Author, Date added, Date published, Size, Rating, Series, etc.

    In addition, it supports extra searchable metadata:
    • Tags: A flexible system for categorizing your collection however you like
    • Comments: A long form entry that you can use for book description, notes, reviews, etc.
    You can easily search your book collection for a particular book. calibre supports searching any and all of the fields mentioned above. You can construct advanced search queries by clicking the helpful "Advanced search" button to the left of the search bar.

    You can export arbitrary subsets of your collection to your hard disk arranged in a fully customizable folder structure.

    Finally, calibre will even go out onto the internet to find book metadata based on existing title/author or ISBN information. It can download various types of metadata and covers for your books, automatically. The metadata system is written using plugins so that different types of metadata sources can be supported in the future.
  • E-book conversion calibre can convert from a huge number of formats to a huge number of formats. It supports all the major e-book formats. The full list of formats can be found here.

    The conversion engine has lots of powerful features. It can rescale all font sizes, ensuring the output e-book is readable no matter what font sizes the input document uses. It can automatically detect/create book structure, like chapters and Table of Contents. It can insert the book metadata into a "Book Jacket" at the start of the book.
  • Syncing to e-book reader devices calibre has a modular device driver design that makes adding support for different e-reader devices easy. At the moment, it has support for a large number of devices, the complete list of which is here. Syncing supports updating metadata on the device from metadata in the library and creation of collections on the device based on the tags defined in the library. If a book has more than one format available, calibre automatically chooses the best format when uploading to the device. If none of the formats is suitable, calibre will automatically convert the e-book to a format suitable for the device before sending it.
  • Downloading news from the web and converting it into e-book form calibre can automatically fetch news from websites or RSS feeds, format the news into a ebook and upload to a connected device. The ebooks include the full versions of the articles, not just the summaries. Examples of supported news sites include:
    • The New York Times
    • The Wall Street Journal
    • The Economist
    • Time
    • Newsweek
    • The Guardian
    • ESPN
    • and many, many more…
    calibre has over three hundred news sources and the news system is plugin based, allowing users to easily create and contribute new sources to calibre. As a result the collection of news sources keeps on growing!

    If you are interested in adding support for a news site, read the User Manual. Once you have successfully created a new recipe, you can share it with other users by posting it in the calibre forum Posted Image or sending it to the calibre developers for inclusion in calibre.
  • Comprehensive e-book viewer calibre has a built-in ebook viewer that can display all the major ebook formats. It has full support for Table of Contents, bookmarks, CSS, a reference mode, printing, searching, copying, customizing the rendering via a user style sheet, embedded fonts, etc.
  • Content server for online access to your book collection

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#7 who here is a guru?

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 06:56 AM

what's a bump and a shock? i'm thinking of buying this: http://www.tulipstuff.com/asus-7-eee-pc-4g-netbook-intel-celeron-m-353-512mb-ddr2-4gb-p-16630.html

the page says: "Bumps and shocks are no longer issues. With a dependable solid-state disk, you get unparalleled shock-protection and reliability."

when i hear the word shock, i either think (1) static shock or (2) suspension system on a motor vehicle. i don't understand what they mean by saying bump and shock. anyway i was hoping for ubuntu but it says linux pearl white. is that good too? i'm a noob. the thing i like is the built-in WiFi 802.11 b/g 'always connected'

Edited by who here is a guru?, 10 March 2011 - 07:00 AM.


#8 Ramchu

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 07:59 AM

what's a bump and a shock?

I believe that they are referring to rough handling of the equipment ( dropping it /bumping it against things )

#9 buddy215

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:28 AM

Ubuntu Netbook Edition can be downloaded and run as a live CD to test if it recognizes your new netbook
hardware, etc before installing it. Netbook | Ubuntu
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#10 Capn Easy

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 01:03 PM

The way I installed Ubuntu on my netbook may not be for everyone, but I was happy with it.

I picked up a new notebook hard drive for about $35 and spent 15 minutes swapping it with the original hard drive. I loaded Ubuntu on the new hard drive and gave it a spin. If I found that I didn't like it, I could swap the Windows hard drive back in. As it was, I loved it! Bought an enclosure and had a drive for back-ups. Total extra expense was about $50.

Or, you could save the Windows drive to swap back in if you ever want to sell the netbook.

#11 Barajiqal

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 05:03 PM

Don't have a netbook myself, but have installed ubuntu on several of my friends (after much convincing, seems only "computer people" know about the mythological Ubuntu :hysterical: ) I haven't touched windows in my personal life for about a year now. If only I could do this at work :sigh: Can't argue with that setup Clamav may not be needed, but once Ubuntu becomes more mainstream it will be especially when I read in the paper that finicial advisors are recomending a linux comp for online banking and what not. If there is money to be had the jerks who try and steal it won't be far behind...
"I am Become Death, Destroyer of Worlds" - (Verse 32 Chapter 11 of the Bhagavad Gita) Robert J Oppenheimer

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#12 who here is a guru?

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 09:57 AM

The way I installed Ubuntu on my netbook may not be for everyone, but I was happy with it.

I picked up a new notebook hard drive for about $35 and spent 15 minutes swapping it with the original hard drive. I loaded Ubuntu on the new hard drive and gave it a spin. If I found that I didn't like it, I could swap the Windows hard drive back in. As it was, I loved it! Bought an enclosure and had a drive for back-ups. Total extra expense was about $50.

Or, you could save the Windows drive to swap back in if you ever want to sell the netbook.


sounds like a good idea because verizon is selling netbooks with windoze which doesn't sit well with me. i will save your advice and if i buy the verizon netbook i 'd need to muster up the courage ..one of these days. so would i be accurate in saying a netbook doesn't need a wireless router? can you tell me what that's for in a nutshell? those are for NOTEbooks and desktops, right?

Edited by who here is a guru?, 11 March 2011 - 10:01 AM.


#13 who here is a guru?

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 12:55 PM

do all netbooks have solid state drives?

#14 Capn Easy

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 05:30 PM

I suspect most have conventional hard drives, not SSDs -- especially where price is a consideration. I know that my Acer Aspire One netbook came with a conventional laptop 2.5" SATA hard drive.




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