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MSE alert on Java


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#1 jimnor46

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 10:47 AM

Don't know if this is the right place to post, if not, move it.

On 2/17, while on the computer, got a notice from Java for a new update to 6-24 (I believe that was the update). Went ahead and did the update like I have done in the past.
On 2/18, I got a security alert from MSE saying I had TWO severe security alerts.
1. Exploit: Java/Midesq.A
2. Exploit: Java/CVE-2010-0840,/Z

Both alerts were classified as SEVERE and recommended removal.

I let MSE remove them.

Question, was this a legit security alert or was this a false positive from the Java update?
Has anyone else experieced this on their Java updates?

Thanks, as always, I appreciate the help.

.

Edited by hamluis, 19 February 2011 - 05:18 PM.
Moved from Breaking Virus & Security News to Am I Infected.


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#2 boopme

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 09:11 PM

Hello, Are you running XP,Vista ,Win7??

This threat exploits a known vulnerability in the Java Runtime Environment (JRE). To prevent your computer from being vulnerable to this malware, make sure that you install the updates available from the vendor. You can read more about this vulnerability from the following links:
•CVE-2010-0840
•Java updates

http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Exploit%3AJava%2FCVE-2010-0840.Z&ThreatID=-2147325699

They were exposed by the update. 6/24 was the latest. Now it is possible they were in (exploited) oldrr Java on your machine. So let's check and remove any. I am just going to post the complete instuctions.

Important Note: Your version of Java is out of date. Older versions have vulnerabilities that malicious sites can use to exploit and infect your system. Microsoft: ‘Unprecedented Wave of Java Exploitation’
Drive-by Trojan preying on out-of-date Java installations
Ghosts of Java Haunt UsersPlease follow these steps to remove older version Java components and update:
  • Download the latest version of Java Runtime Environment (JRE) Version 6 and save it to your desktop.
  • Look for "Java Platform, Standard Edition".
  • Click the "Download JRE" button to the right.
  • Select your Platform: "Windows" (32-bit) or "Windows x64" (64-bit).
  • Select your Language: "Multi-language".
  • Read the License Agreement, and then check the box that says: "I agree to the Java SE...License Agreement".
  • Click Continue and the page will refresh.
  • Under Required Files, check the box for Windows Offline Installation, click the link below it and save the file to your desktop.
  • Close any programs you may have running - especially your web browser.
Go to Posted Image > Control Panel, double-click on Add/Remove Programs or Programs and Features in Vista/Windows 7 and remove all older versions of Java.
  • Check (highlight) any item with Java Runtime Environment (JRE or J2SE) in the name.
  • Click the Remove or Change/Remove button and follow the onscreen instructions for the Java uninstaller.
  • Repeat as many times as necessary to remove each Java versions.
  • Reboot your computer once all Java components are removed.
  • Then from your desktop double-click on jre-6u24-windows-i586.exe to install the newest version.
  • If using Windows 7 or Vista and the installer refuses to launch due to insufficient user permissions, then Run As Administrator.
  • When the Java Setup - Welcome window opens, click the Install > button.
  • If offered to install a Toolbar, just uncheck the box before continuing unless you want it.
-- Starting with Java 6u10, the uninstaller incorporated in each new release uses Enhanced Auto update to automatically remove the previous version when updating to a later update release. It will not remove older versions, so they will need to be removed manually.
-- Java is updated frequently. If you want to be automatically notified of future updates, just turn on the Java Automatic Update feature and you will not have to remember to update when Java releases a new version.


Note: The Java Quick Starter (JQS.exe) adds a service to improve the initial startup time of Java applets and applications but it's not necessary.
To disable the JQS service if you don't want to use it:
  • Go to Start > Control Panel > Java > Advanced > Miscellaneous and uncheck the box for Java Quick Starter.
  • Click Ok and reboot your computer.


Now to be sure there is nothing else here....

Next run MBAM (MalwareBytes):

Please download Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and save it to your desktop.
Download Link 1
Download Link 2MBAM may "make changes to your registry" as part of its disinfection routine. If using other security programs that detect registry changes (ie Spybot's Teatimer), they may interfere or alert you. Temporarily disable such programs or permit them to allow the changes.
  • Make sure you are connected to the Internet.
  • Double-click on mbam-setup.exe to install the application.
    For instructions with screenshots, please refer to the How to use Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware Guide.
  • When the installation begins, follow the prompts and do not make any changes to default settings.
  • When installation has finished, make sure you leave both of these checked:
    • Update Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
    • Launch Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
  • Then click Finish.
MBAM will automatically start and you will be asked to update the program before performing a scan.
  • If an update is found, the program will automatically update itself. Press the OK button to close that box and continue.
  • If you encounter any problems while downloading the definition updates, manually download them from here and just double-click on mbam-rules.exe to install.
On the Scanner tab:
  • Make sure the "Perform Quick Scan" option is selected.
  • Then click on the Scan button.
  • If asked to select the drives to scan, leave all the drives selected and click on the Start Scan button.
  • The scan will begin and "Scan in progress" will show at the top. It may take some time to complete so please be patient.
  • When the scan is finished, a message box will say "The scan completed successfully. Click 'Show Results' to display all objects found".
  • Click OK to close the message box and continue with the removal process.
Back at the main Scanner screen:
  • Click on the Show Results button to see a list of any malware that was found.
  • Make sure that everything is checked, and click Remove Selected.
  • When removal is completed, a log report will open in Notepad.
  • The log is automatically saved and can be viewed by clicking the Logs tab in MBAM.
  • Copy and paste the contents of that report in your next reply. Be sure to post the complete log to include the top portion which shows MBAM's database version and your operating system.
  • Exit MBAM when done.
Note: If MBAM encounters a file that is difficult to remove, you will be asked to reboot your computer so MBAM can proceed with the disinfection process. If asked to restart the computer, please do so immediately. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware.

Troubleshoot Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
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#3 jimnor46

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 07:34 AM

Thanks for the reply Boopme.

I'm running Vista, I.E.7

After I got the MSE alert and did the removal that was recommended I immediately updated and ran MBAM. I do this on an almost daily basis anyway. There were no problems found/reported.

I again went to the link that you provided to Java and downloaded the newest version. In my control panel, in Java, I had no old Java versions. When
I do the Java updates, it always deletes the old versions.

Just finished doing another MBAM scan and again, nothing found.

Do you think the problem has been taken care of? If there is anything else I need to do, please advise.

Once again, thanks for the help. I'll be looking for your response.

.

#4 boopme

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 12:16 PM

Yes I forget after which updater they finally include the old version remover.
Looks clean.
You should also check your Adobe items,if ant and update them,asthey are also exploitable.

If there are no more problems or signs of infection, you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Start > Run and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista Users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point and Disk Cleanup.

Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:Avoid gaming sites, pirated software, cracking tools, keygens, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs. They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Many malicious worms and Trojans spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications. Read P2P Software User Advisories and Risks of File-Sharing Technology.

Keeping Autorun enabled on USB and other removable drives has become a significant security risk due to the increasing number of malware variants that can infect them and transfer the infection to your computer. To learn more about this risk, please read:
How do I get help? Who is helping me?For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear....Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#5 jimnor46

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 10:47 AM

Got it taken care of. Once again thanks for your help. :thumbsup:

.

#6 boopme

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 10:57 AM

You're welcome from us all here.
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#7 quietman7

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 02:11 PM

In case you get these types of alerts again right after a Java update, read Can Java downloads be infected with a virus?

Both legitimate and malicious applets / malicious Java class files are stored in the Java cache directory and your anti-virus may detect them as threats.
.
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#8 jimnor46

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 02:37 PM

Interesting reading quietman7. I thought that I might have gotten a false-positive alert because it happened the day after I did the updates and both alerts were on Java. But what the heck, better be safe than sorry that's why I went ahead and deleted them and did the cleanup that Boopme suggested.

I hope y'all don't mine but I recommend this site to people all the time. I belong to a homesteading website that has a computer forum and I've posted y'alls website there several times when someone needed help. Just last week one of the members said "bleepingcomputer.com rocks." She had an infected computer that a computer tech had charged her $95 to clean up and then told her it wasn't possible, to just reinstall her OS. She came here to BC and y'all helped her clean it up FOR FREE. Needless to say she thinks y'all are absolutely great, which I agree.

Thanks again, the help was greatly appreciated. :thumbsup:


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#9 quietman7

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 06:17 PM

better be safe than sorry that's why I went ahead and deleted them and did the cleanup that Boopme suggested.

I agree and usually recommend the same as a precaution.

Thank you for the kind words and recommendation. :thumbup2:
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