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how can I set email to "no script" and should I?


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#1 mischievous

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 12:16 PM

:o I believe I have received a virus through the email body, not any attachment. Since all the trouble that followed and Clean Install etc, I have been reading up on ways to help problems in the future.

I have read that to disable scripting in email can stop the virus from excecuting. I'm not sure if I am wording this correctly but would appreciate any advice.
I have set my emails to plain text too and will be more aware of any attachments I receive, though as I said, I believe said problem originally occured through the body of the email. I thought that wasn't possible...

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#2 Andrew

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 01:28 PM

It all depends on what e-mail client you're using. Microsoft Outlook is especially notorious for exposing users to dangerous messages. Setting the view options to plaintext should greatly reduce your chances of infection, though. And, of course, don't run your e-mail client with Administrator rights.

#3 mischievous

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 01:49 PM

It all depends on what e-mail client you're using. Microsoft Outlook is especially notorious for exposing users to dangerous messages. Setting the view options to plaintext should greatly reduce your chances of infection, though. And, of course, don't run your e-mail client with Administrator rights.


Hello, the email I run is AOL though I have the program on one laptop I only use the aol webmail on this one. Also how to I apply to "not use administrator rights?"

#4 Andrew

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 04:01 PM

The best way to not have administrator rights is to not log on as the Administrator at all. You should use a "standard" or "limited" account for day-to-day activities. How to do this depends on which version of Windows you're using.

#5 mischievous

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:08 PM

The best way to not have administrator rights is to not log on as the Administrator at all. You should use a "standard" or "limited" account for day-to-day activities. How to do this depends on which version of Windows you're using.



Ok Andrew I know what you mean now. I do use the "Limited" account I set up. I am using windows 7 on this laptop and I didn't bother to install my aol software and check emails through the web aol-email. I seem to have had problems from said email a few weeks ago and have tried to step up security hence being told to set the "no script" thing. Not sure how to do this. I was thinking it might be in the Internet Explorer Advanced Setting but didn't want to proceed until Iknew for sure.

I am also running the trial mcafee internet security suite to see if I am happy with it and if so will purchase it. Not sure if that would make a difference to any settings I should make but thought I should inform you anyway.

Edited by mischievous, 16 February 2011 - 05:13 PM.


#6 Andrew

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 07:13 PM

You can turn off scripting in Internet Explorer by following this guide. Bear in mind that disabling scripting in Internet Explorer is an all-or-nothing deal and many websites will "break" if Javascript is disabled.

The "NoScript" you've heard about is probably a reference to the NoScript addon for Mozilla Firefox, a free web browser which is considered by many to be superior to Internet Explorer.

NoScript allows you to selectively enable Javascript and other types of web scripting on websites that you trust while disabling it on all other sites. It is a very, very handy addon that I recommend highly as it is a very effective countermeasure to the vast majority of web-based attacks.

Edited by Andrew, 16 February 2011 - 07:13 PM.


#7 mischievous

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 07:55 PM

You can turn off scripting in Internet Explorer by following this guide. Bear in mind that disabling scripting in Internet Explorer is an all-or-nothing deal and many websites will "break" if Javascript is disabled.

The "NoScript" you've heard about is probably a reference to the NoScript addon for Mozilla Firefox, a free web browser which is considered by many to be superior to Internet Explorer.

NoScript allows you to selectively enable Javascript and other types of web scripting on websites that you trust while disabling it on all other sites. It is a very, very handy addon that I recommend highly as it is a very effective countermeasure to the vast majority of web-based attacks.


Thank you very much for your replies. I have read many times about the other browser and shall read more from the links you advise tomorrow and maybe go that direction because I don't really want to break more than I fix by changing things I don't really understand.

One last th ing I'd like to know please. If I decide to use firefox, and I go to web-based aol for my emails, could I then use the add-on you speak of so that any email I open has any strange script disabled. Is that correct?

#8 Andrew

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 08:12 PM

If the script is loaded from a file located at a domain you haven't explicitly allowed to run scripts, then yes.

For example, you would probably let www.aol.com run scripts that make up their webmail interface (I've never used AOL so I don't know how much scripting they use, if at all.) If someone sent you an e-mail that loaded a script from www.badsite.com then NoScript would block it.

#9 mischievous

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 03:02 AM

If the script is loaded from a file located at a domain you haven't explicitly allowed to run scripts, then yes.

For example, you would probably let www.aol.com run scripts that make up their webmail interface (I've never used AOL so I don't know how much scripting they use, if at all.) If someone sent you an e-mail that loaded a script from www.badsite.com then NoScript would block it.



Then after I've done a little work today I shall install firefox and see how I get on with it. I'm finding myself get into a bit of a panic since stepping up security. I'm not liking getting asked lots of question about should I let xxx change/install on my computer (UAC)though, I'm likely to change all the registry and muck everything up... :hysterical:

Once again, Thank You so much for your advice. Bleeping Computer is a Great Site. Love it. :thumbsup:




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