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best platform to write assembly codes???


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7 replies to this topic

#1 karthic rao

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 10:13 AM

I have started learning assembly codes for intel based computers ,want to know which among these is the best place to write assembly codes.M.A.S.M , N.A.S.M or GAS assembler from linux???????Please help me out!!

Edit: Moved topic from Tutorials to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal

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#2 groovicus

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 01:12 PM

What does 'best' mean to you?

#3 Minh Triet Pham Tran

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 05:08 PM

It depends on your needs :) .
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#4 DavidWJ

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 02:25 AM

There is NO best.. Both products mentioned are very good. That's like what is the best html.editor.. many people will say notepad. for assembler one could always use a hex editor but getting the .exe header right might be a problem.

#5 Didier Stevens

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 02:03 PM

What syntax is used in the material you are using to study assembly?

MASM and NASM use different syntaxes. It's easier to use the assembler with the syntax that is used in your tutorials.

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#6 Didier Stevens

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 02:09 PM

for assembler one could always use a hex editor


Actually, you would use an hex editor for machine code, not for assembly code.

Assembly language uses mnemonics for instructions, like this one 'pop ebx'.
In machine code, the instructions and operands are bytes.
For example, the machine code for 'pop ebx' in x86 is one byte: 5B

An assembler like NASM translates assembly code into machine code.
A CPU executes machine code, not assembly code.

Edited by Didier Stevens, 23 February 2012 - 02:09 PM.

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#7 Romeo29

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 08:51 PM

As far as I know, MASM32 is only for Windows and not Linux. I have not used any other assemblers, so no idea about them.

#8 Didier Stevens

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 05:09 AM

As far as I know, MASM32 is only for Windows and not Linux. I have not used any other assemblers, so no idea about them.


Correct. Although it could be that Wine can be used to run MASM on Linux.

NASM runs on Linux, Windows, ...

A tip: Wikipedia has many pages comparing all kinds of products.
There's one for assemblers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_assemblers

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