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Duplicate data recognition


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#1 Geoff777

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 03:01 AM

Hi

We have a fairly small Intranet at work (approximately 20 terminals in addition to the main server) A new employee has suggested we might benefit from installing software that prevents users from saving data if that data is already files somewhere on the Intranet.
I have seen somewhere that this is possible but l do have a couiple of questions:

Firstly cost? is it worth it considering the size of our Intranet? And how much is it?

Secondly. can anyone think of any disadvantages? if so do the advantages outweigh these?

Any advice/information would be appreciated.

Thanks

Geoff
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#2 hamluis

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 06:56 PM

Hi :).

First...I'm a person who sees the need/utility of having duplicate files on any system. By extension, I see the need for such on any network.

The idea that duplicate files is bad...originated with the old Windows 9x series, when hard drives were small, RAM was small, and Windows 9x was far from perfect.

Since then, hard drive size has grown tremendously...negating the potential concern to try to save/utilize every bit of hard drive space.

I personally think it's a bad suggestion from someone who really doesn't understand computers or a network and the varying uses the various users may have.

What happens if a data file I want...is on your system...but you are ill and your system is off...can I access that data?

A hard drive is not something that functions better...if there the number of files stored on it is minimal. Neither is the O/S...neither is a network, IMO.

Louis

#3 Geoff777

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 03:11 AM

Hi Louis

Thank you very much for your response.
You have confirmed my own opinions.

Many thanks

Geoff
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#4 hamluis

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 10:01 AM

Easily done, I have tons of opinions :)...happy computing :).

Louis

#5 AdamV

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:36 AM

I disagree strongly with hamluis that duplicate files are not an issue in a business context. This has nothing to do with the capability of hardware or cost of storage but the practical realities of business efficiency and risk.
If there is a standard company letter template, there should be one copy of this which everyone uses. When it is updated, everyone carries on using it and they are using the correct, approved, updated version - not some five-years old copy they happen to have lying around on their computer.
If I have a spreadsheet which is regularly updated then everyone needs to be able to update and access the same file, not lots of separate ones (maybe even something as basic as a list of clients' addresses, let alone something containing financial information).

If the file you need is on my system when I am not there, then I need some re-education (perhaps involving the use of a Big Training Stick TM) about why files should always be saved in a shared area which is in the right place, properly secured to allow the appropriate level of access to the relevent people. This applies to anyone saving files in locations which are too secure (no-one else can get to them when needed) or insecure (everyone can read the HR files) or just downright disorganised, or where they are not backed up.

What you have here is largely a people problem, not a technical one. If I am saving a file in the most appropriate place for it, then it should be obvious to me that such a file already exists there. Yes, I know that there are always edge cases where maybe a file could belong in location A or B, but a system to do fuzzy matching and decide if your file is similar to any existing file on the system would be a huge ask at the point of saving, and likely to be very unproductive for staff.

Just my opinion, of course...
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