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Linux on a 64 bit


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#1 John79

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 02:52 PM

I have used Linux before and it does not seem to work well on 64 bit and dual booting. I have never tried booting linux from a pendrive I have vista ultimate 64 bit os 8 gigas of RAM and two HDDs 300 and a 500. I have a 16 giga pendrive will that work its HP.

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#2 Ramchu

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 10:03 AM

A 32 bit linux os should work just fine on a 64 bit system even in a dual boot setup.
It will just not see/use all of the memory.

As for the pendrive - YES - that should work .

What Linux Distro are you going to try ?

I presently have a dual boot setup and both my Linux and Win XP SP3 work very well - although it is a 32 bit system.

#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 02:17 AM

In my experience, you cannot install a 32 bit operating system on the same hard drive as a 64 bit Operating system and expect them to dual boot properly. If your using dual hard drives or, like you say a pen drive, it should work ok, but the two dont in my experience work when trying to install a 32 bit linux OS on a partition with a hard drive containing 64 bit windows. I have however, noticed the linuxs that I have had the most luck running 64 bit are OpenSuSe, and Ubuntu. They may be worth a try if you havent already.

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#4 pane-free

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 04:57 AM

I have used Linux before and it does not seem to work well on 64 bit and dual booting . . .


If 64-bit is desired,
a) Do not dual-boot -- install another dedicated hard drive, instead;
b) since Linux is not new to you and 64-bit is preferred, I suggest you try either
i) aptosid as put forth here
& downloaded here or
ii) salix64-13.1.2-xfce

Have fun! & Best wishes!

Edited by pane-free, 13 February 2011 - 04:57 AM.

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#5 yu gnomi

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 05:38 PM

Sorry to necro an old topic, but could someone elaborate on the issue of installing 64 bit linux to a HD with 32 bit Windows?

 

I have already done this, and both OS's seem to work fine. However, GRUB still gives me the option to "continue the installation" of Linux (Debian "Wheezy" if it matters) whenever I opt to boot Windows XP.

 

Are there any other problems I should worry about? and is there an easy way to fix the GRUB boot loader that doesn't risk making my machine un-bootable?



#6 cat1092

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 01:12 AM

64 bit Linux will run fine alonside of 32 bit Windows if there is a 64 bit CPU installed. That presents no problem.

 

However, as pane-free has stated in post #4, it's good for the safety of the Windows install to have Linux on a spare or 2nd drive. In the BIOS, one can decide which drive wants to be the first to boot & move it up. Normally this will be the drive containing the most used OS. To accomplish this, remove the power & data cables from the drive containing Windows, the Linux installer won't see it. Once Linux is installed & updated, then shut down & plug the Windows drive back in. Upon reboot, that's when it's needed to go into the BIOS & make the needed changes.

 

This gives the user the option to press whatever "F" key needed at boot to access the other drive & Linux won't overwrite the Windows boot loader.

 

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#7 jonuk76

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 01:00 PM

Yes, no problem having 64 bit Linux and 32 bit Windows installed.  I have exactly that setup on one computer.

 

As an aside, most current 32bit distributions of Linux (which have PAE support) will recognise more than 4gb memory.


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#8 cat1092

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 01:10 PM

The way that I described above is also the way that Linux Mint is installed on two (soon to be three) computers & both works well. Should I decide to install a newer version, I simply do as above, remove the SSD containing Windows (these are notebooks) & install the new one on the OEM HDD.

 

This way has worked fine for me for 3-4 years.

 

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#9 yu gnomi

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:00 PM

I suppose it would have been safer to install Linux to it's own drive, but I am not made of hard drives. I have exactly 1 internal HD with 2 OS's on it (Win XP and Linux), and 1 external HD with no OS on it- because I don't want to boot and run an OS through a USB connection (at least not long-term). I was OK with running Linux off of a thumb drive short term though, because it was just an experiment.



#10 cat1092

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 11:06 PM

 

I was OK with running Linux off of a thumb drive short term though, because it was just an experiment.

Well, being that you already have a Windows/Linux dual boot, you have 2 choices. Replace your current Linux with the 64 bit version.

 

Or for safety & to see just how it's going to run, try it out on a Flash drive. I don't know which Linux version you're running because you didn't state it. If it's an Ubuntu based one, the Debian one will install differently & not need reinstall (Debian is a rolling distro). I've only tried Debian once, that was running from a virtual machine.

 

I highly recommend that you try this out separate, if only to see how it acts on your computer. Simply unplug the power & data cables from your computer (or if notebook remove the drive) & install Debian to the Flash drive. It's best to play it safe to preserve what you have.

 

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#11 yu gnomi

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 12:33 AM

My Debian is the 64 bit one. I was mostly responding to this:

 

In my experience, you cannot install a 32 bit operating system on the same hard drive as a 64 bit Operating system and expect them to dual boot properly. 

 

and making a possible connection to why my boot loader still gives the "continue with installation" option, even though the installation has been finished for close to a week now.

 

I just don't like things that don't work like they are supposed to, unless I understand why they didn't work like they were supposed to, and can predict what might happen next. And of course what might happen next has to be something I can live with.

 

In the case of my system, I think the bootloader mess-up isn't very bad, won't get worse, and probably isn't a symptom of anything else (i.e. it's not an indication of a bigger screw-up during my install)






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