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Getting triple monitors to work


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#1 trevzilla

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 04:59 PM

So, I am trying to get triple monitors set up on my computer, and for some reason windows 7 isn't seeing the third monitor.

The motherboard (according to cpu-z) is as follows:
Manufacturer: ASUSTek Computer Inc.
Model: Salmon 1.04
Chipset:SiS 760
Southbridge: SiS 964
LPCIO: SMSC

This Motherboard has a monitor output, as well as a video card port. The video card has two monitor outputs, one HDMI and one VGA. The Video card is an NVIDIA GeForce FX 5500.

I have tested all three monitors and they all work. It seems that the only port that isn't being recognized is the one in the motherboard. (Dual monitors work fine through the video card)

Any thoughts on how to get windows to recognize that I have a third monitor plugged into the motherboard?

Thanks for any help!
Trev

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#2 Zuhl3156

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 05:34 PM

The best explanation and/or answer I can give is this one here:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090813003833AAYRdKF

Edited by Zuhl3156, 05 February 2011 - 06:20 PM.


#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 12:35 AM

With Most computers you cannot run both the integrated and the dedicated video cards simultaneously. If the video card doesnt have 3 outputs, then you may have to use something along the lines of this to get a third monitor. Thats kind of an odd card, most cards have 3 outputs, either 2 DVI and a S-video out, a DVI, a VGA and a S-video (or HDMI) depending on the card.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#4 SavageOne

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 04:19 AM

Basically you would need to invest in an ATI 5xxx series card to natively push to 3 monitors. Otherwise you need specialty programs and hardware. But 5xxx cards can be had for under $150, which is fairly impressive functionality for the price. Unless I've misunderstood and your trying to push the same image to 3 monitors, and not have 3 continuous screens.

Edited by SavageOne, 06 February 2011 - 04:21 AM.


#5 the_patriot11

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 05:48 PM

thats not entirely true, Ive extended desktops onto 3 monitors with my old school ati 1250. . .Should be able to do something similar with NVIDIA cards. Even with my 4890, all I would need is 2 DVI monitors and a S-video adaptor-what you usually have to do is have 2 be a copy and one extended, usually works pretty well, and you can do it with cards older then the 5xxx series.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#6 SavageOne

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 01:34 PM

I know its possible to make older cards work, but in my experience I've seen some terrible refresh and response rates. The newer ATI cards simply support the ability natively from the CCC window, and are very user friendly in that regard. Also, if your throwing three monitors on a single system, then your most likely looking at some massive databases, or have $$$ to burn, so a $150 upgrade seems a fairly viable option to me. I'm also basing the upgrade rec on the fact that his current GPU only has 2 outputs. I'm not saying its impossible to get more monitors running, as I think XP, Vista and 7 all recognize 4, just that a good upgrade for relatively cheap would be one of the new 5xxx series card, as Eyefinity can theoretically handle 16 monitors or so, possibly more with the new 5870 Eyefinity-6 edition, which, as you guessed, natively pushes to 6 monitors via HDMI cables. Although all this conjecture is all relative, as the original poster still hasn't told us if he's cloning any of these or extending all of them.

Edited by SavageOne, 07 February 2011 - 01:36 PM.


#7 Zuhl3156

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 02:25 PM

SavageOne, I've also noticed that his motherboard is rather dated(pre 2005) and his video board is AGP. I don't know that he can find a suitable video board for that system.

#8 SavageOne

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 10:03 PM

True, every once in a while the industry will simply pass you by, and upgrades just don't cut it. They may just have to give in and build a new rig.

#9 Zuhl3156

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 09:18 AM

I think that software limitations sometimes play a role in whether a new PC is even feasible in many cases. Some of these computers are used in a 'Home Office' environment where the user has been using a program to gather, compile and store customer information and other data. They continued to use these programs long after the utility has been phased out or the company has gone out of business because it suited their needs and they were comfortable using it. Now they have years and years of invaluable data that cannot be transfered to a newer equivalent program because of the format the data was originally stored and compiled with. If the user is an accountant, this would mean weeks or even months of work. Due to the lack of response, we may never know.




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