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Refreshing data on a hard drive (to prevent it from "evaporating" over time)


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#1 soyo

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 01:05 PM

Hello.

I was recently made aware, that the data on the disc will vanish overtime due to the fact they are stored in a magnetic way, if the disc is not used internaly. This is the case with my 500GB Seagate disc, that I consider as data storage, and which is just laying on the shelf in a closet.

I wanted to ask what I need to do to prevent it. Do I need only to READ the data off the disc, or do I have to RE-WRITE them to prevent this from happening ? If I only need to read them, is there a command in windows XP terminal, that I could use to do this ? I found a command for MAC to read the whole disc:
sudo cat /dev/rdisk0> /dev/null
but I can't find similar for Windows XP.

The best soslution for me though, would be to use the software to scan the disc, as I want to do it from time to time, to check if everything with the disc is ok. So, would scanning of the whole disc using some software (to find bad secotrs) like for example "Active@ Hard Disk Monitor" do the trick ? If it would coule be great, as I would cook 2 dishes on a 1 stove.

Thanks guys

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 01:08 PM

Can't say as I have ever heard of this-I still have 10 year old Hard drives in my garage that every time I plug in, (which is extremely rare) still have all their original data on it. . .I have never heard of a hard drive losing information from sitting, unless you have it sitting next to a magnet of course.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 01:28 PM

I agree with the_patriot09. This information is so difficult to remove that there are forensic techniques that can retrieve information from hdds that have been wiped.

One thing that you should consider is to back up your important files on removable media. I prefer CDs or DVDs. If the media is of a good quality and the disks are stored properly they will last for many years.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 soyo

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 02:46 PM

http://www.larryjordan.biz/articles/lj_hard_disk_warning.html

#5 dc3

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 02:57 PM

I see suggestions, but no supported facts in the article.

If you are this concerned, the immediate solution is to do what I suggested in my previous post.

You can also stop using hdds by switching to SSDs.

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#6 soyo

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 03:35 PM

I see suggestions, but no supported facts in the article.

This is true, and it's not like I believe it ;)

Was just looking for information about it. I see that many people seemed as confused as you guys were, so indeed there might be nothing in it.

If you are this concerned, the immediate solution is to do what I suggested in my previous post.

As for CDs and DVD's, that's actually what I did before, but I prefer nowadays HDD's not only because it's more convinient (I came to a point, where I had many, many DVD's, and going through them became very time consuming, while with HDD's it's all in one place), but also because I consider it simply, more safe. The only issue with HDD's is really mechanical problems, but if that happens, the HDD just needs to be repaired. There is no damage to the data however.

Thanks for your suggestions though, and for kind reply.

#7 hamluis

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 09:17 AM

FWIW: I find it interesting...that Mr. Jordan seems to be the only reference I can find online, with regard to this assertion. And his "cures" seem to be directed to Mac users.

Louis




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