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Egyptian Government orders ISPs to shut down Internet access


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#1 Galadriel

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 12:49 AM

In an unprecedented and surprisingly evil twist, the Egyptian government has ordered all the of the countries ISPs to shut down access to internet. Reoprts have been coming in over the last few hours confirming this. This has in effect, officially isolated all of the citizens, businesses, schools and other organizations in that country from the rest of the world. As violence and protests escalate, the country now no longer has connection to the world. Nor does it apparently have cell phone service (including Blackberry and SMS).

More at the Huffington Post:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/27/egypt-internet-goes-down-_n_815156.html
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/27/egypt-protests-live-updates_n_815154.html

http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypt-leaves-the-internet.shtml

Here's one to file under what were they thinking. Expect demonstrations to turn to full fledged riots in the coming days.

Edited by Blade Zephon, 28 January 2011 - 12:56 AM.
Moved from Breaking Virus & Security News to a more appropriate location. ~BZ

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#2 Galadriel

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 02:21 AM

The Associated Press reports some of the timeline in another article on this unprecedented censorship move.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110128/ap_on_hi_te/us_egypt_protest_internet_outage

Also, Anonymous jumps on board the bandwagon. (Not linking to their 'press release', but you can google and find it rather easily.)
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#3 Blade

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 03:27 AM

This is a really big deal, and it saddens me to think that a government is so bent on silencing dissension that they would go to this extreme. This punishes innocent and uninvolved citizens, as well as hurts their economy and businesses. The world needs to come together and rebuke Egypt for their repressive action.

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#4 myrti

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 05:34 AM

This was bound to happen, after Egypt saw what happened in Iran and Tunesia with the help of the internet.
I am however more concerned about the actions the government is planning than about riots/the people demonstrating. If the government feels, they have to exclude the world community to proceed in shutting down the demonstration the news we will be getting from Egypt are going to get worse.

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#5 Union_Thug

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 06:23 AM

Egypt's Internet goes dark during political unrest http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20029862-281.html#ixzz1CKIBT8eu

In a stunning development unprecedented in the modern history of the Internet, a country of more than 80 million people has found itself almost entirely disconnected from the rest of the world.

The near-disconnection--at least one Internet provider is still online--comes after days of street protests demanding an end to nearly three decades of autocratic rule by President Hosni Mubarak. Those followed this month's revolution in Tunisia, another country with little political freedom and high levels of corruption, and reports of overnight arrests and clashes with security forces.


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Egypt: Internet Down, Gov't Braces for Unrest http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/01/27/world/main7292097.shtml?tag=topnews

The developments were a sign that President Hosni Mubarak's regime was toughening its crackdown following the biggest protests in years against his nearly 30-year rule.
The counter-terror force, rarely seen on the streets, took up positions in strategic locations, including central Tahrir Square, site of the biggest demonstrations this week.


Things are turning ugly very rapidly according to reports.

Edited by Union_Thug, 28 January 2011 - 06:27 AM.


#6 Union_Thug

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 10:28 AM

This reminds me of Iran '79 & the ouster of the Shah more and more with each report is see/hear. I read that Mubarek's family (supposedly) has fled the country (no link).

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/25/AR2011012500866.html?wpisrc=nl_natlalert

CAIRO - Heavily armed riot police battled thousands of protesters across Cairo on Friday, as the Egyptian government sought to squelch a burgeoning pro-democracy movement that appears to be gaining strength.
snip

But crowds nevertheless surged onto the streets after noon prayers, in response to organizers' call for a day of protests dubbed "Angry Friday." News reports said protesters were clashing with police in Suez and Alexandria as well.

In the capital, tear gas blanketed much of downtown, as demonstrators sought to converge on the centrally located Tahrir Square. They were met by police wielding clubs and water cannons.

Despite the crackdown, the protesters showed no signs of leaving, and they continued to chant slogans demanding the removal of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.


More at link

#7 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 11:09 AM

Wow. :blink:
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#8 jgweed

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 11:59 AM

This action may well both isolate the Egyptian Government from the international community and whatever support remains for the current government, and alienate even more moderate citizens who will join the protests and topple the government.
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#9 Union_Thug

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 12:40 PM

Headquarters of Egypt's ruling National Democratic Party on fire
Source: Al Jazeera English http://blogs.aljazeera.net/middle-east/2011/01/28/friday-protests-liveblog

6:48 pm - Fire still raging at the compound in Cairo that houses the ruling National Democratic Party. No indication that any fire engines are responding yet. And Ayman Mohyeldin reminds us that Egypt's famous national museum - the home of priceless artifacts dating back to the Pharaonic era country - sits nearby.


Al Jazeera English Live Stream (Real Player needed) http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/





Edited by Union_Thug, 28 January 2011 - 03:25 PM.


#10 Eyesee

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 01:31 PM

http://www.internettrafficreport.com/ isnt reporting any unusual activity there.
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#11 Galadriel

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 05:34 PM

Renesys has updated their blogpost with some more information.

http://www.renesys.com/blog/2011/01/egypt-leaves-the-internet.shtml#latest
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#12 Sightless

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 05:36 PM

I don't see why everyone must get in other countries' business. I do not agree with their actions at all, but the more we stick our noses into foreign affairs, the more annoying we, as a country, become.

#13 Galadriel

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 05:43 PM

I don't see why everyone must get in other countries' business.


Because we are human and where human rights are stifled, it is incumbent on us as humans to protest this and show the world that we will not stand for this.

Also, Egypt receives aid from various other countries and what happens there has consequences elsewhere. Those who supply this aid have a right to know what's happening there so they can make informed decisions about events unfolding that may affect their own country.
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#14 Sightless

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 06:00 PM

And then, when they do something we don't like, we go to war and kill their innocent civilians; or stop providing much needed aid to them. Makes perfect sense to me.

#15 myrti

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 06:10 PM

I don't see why everyone must get in other countries' business.

The reason politicians are invested is because Egypt is an important business partner in the arabic world with much influence and Mubarak has been eating out of the US' hand for many many years. (Egypt's relation to the US)
Political forces are very interested in keeping him in charge of the country because they know they have an ally in him. If there is a democratically elected leader nobody knows with whom they will side.So it's better to keep a dictator in charge than to free the people. There is of course also the fear of the consequences. When Tunesia fell many people estimated that it was a sign, but a sign for the distant future. The beginning of the ending of an era. It was said that the population of the bigger countries would be too scared of their autocratic leaders. If Egypt falls, the population of the other countries will try to rise too and the effect will be plentiful. If you've built up relations for 30 years, you will try to keep the person that you have relations with in important positions. By interfering and trying to keep Mubarak in place they are just trying to preserve their own best interests.

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