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Wireless Setup


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#1 merthyrblue

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 10:05 AM

Have finally managed to get online with my D-Link DSL-G604T Router. But i still don't understand or know where i have to insert this pair of IP addresses i received off my ISP. They are:212.74.112.66 and 212.74.112.67. Any help would be really appreciated. Thanks MB

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#2 bgardner

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 10:19 AM

Hi There,

what exactly is the problem your having?? if your online then all your IP info should be all set. Those could be the default IP's for the router.

Are you trying to connect another computer via your wireless router??

Provide as much info as possible

#3 merthyrblue

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 10:43 AM

Hello Bgardner
This is my first attempt trying to get online via wireless setup and as i have only entered my username and password as given to me by my ISP i thought there was more to it! Thought i would have had to enter the numbers as given to me by my ISP which i posted earlier. I have not set up the security though as i don't have a clue what WEP and WPA are. MB

#4 bgardner

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 12:20 PM

Maybe this link will help you in getting going instead of posting all the instructions

http://www.pcguidebook.com/homenetwork.asp

They walk you through setting up a network, also usually with your router will come a full diagram of how to do it (even pictures!!, my favorite part)

Once you get online then you can worry about the security end of it.

I personally use WEP (26 bit)

which does stand for Wireless Equivalent Privacy

I've read articles that WEP is not the best security, maybe someone else here has a better route you can take for top security

But I also have Up to date Antivirus as well as a firewall, I have read the WEP Alone is not strong enough in some articles,

I am not to familiar with WPA (Wireless Protected Access)

Let us know if you are able to get online wireless at all, are you using a desktop or a laptop??

And just to make sure of the obvious that you have wireless capabilities on the system you are trying to connect.

#5 Rimmer

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 07:45 PM

They are:212.74.112.66 and 212.74.112.67.


Usually two IP addresses close together are your ISPs primary DNS server and alternate DNS server (but I am guessing) - you would specify these where you assigned the TCP/IP properties of the internet port on the router. Not specifying them may make your browsing slower or you may be unable to access some sites.

I strongly recommend you set up wireless security and also make sure you have up-to-date anti-virus, anti-spyware and a good personal firewall in your PCs. Use 1 Anti-Virus program, 1 Firewall and many Anti-Spyware programs, supplemented by occasional online Anti-Virus scans.

hth :thumbsup:

Soltek QBIC, Pentium 4 3.0GHz, 512MB RAM, 200GB SATA HDD, ATI Radeon 9600XT 256MB, Netgear 54Mb/s WAP, ridiculously expensive Satellite Broadband
Windows XP Home SP2, Trend Micro Internet Security, Firefox, Thunderbird, AdAwareSE, Spybot S&D, SpywareBlaster, A-squared Free, Ewido Security Suite.

#6 merthyrblue

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 11:17 AM

Hiya Rimmer
Would love to set up the security but don't have a clue. Is there anyone who would be kind enough to give me a walk through on this subject. Many thanks. MB

#7 Rimmer

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 06:23 PM

Was there no manual with this router? You can download one from D-Link here:
http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=372 - under 'Product Manual'. It's a zipped pdf file so you will need to unzip it (Win XP can do that itself) and view it using the free acrobat reader or another pdf capable office package.
Warning before printing - It's 80 pages!

A brief overview:
You access the router's configuration via your web browser, by typing it's IP address in the navigation bar.
Thus http://192.168.1.1 you will then see a logon screen and the default username and password are admin. (Note if the router was preconfigured by your ISP these values may have been changed.)

See p42 for entering those DNS addresses.

Security - there are three types of security you can use - WEP, WPA and MAC addressing.

MAC addressing
This provides tight security since the router will only respond to computers that have their MAC address (a code embeded in their network card) listed on the router. The drawback is it takes away from the flexibility of the wireless network i.e. any new devices will not work until you update the router. You can also block specific MAC addresses. You can combine this feature with WEP or WPA.

WEP
Wired Equivalent Privacy - This encrypts the data broadcast by the router with a 128bit "key" which you generate by choosing a phrase. You enter the same "key" in all the recieving PCs (clients) and they are then able to decode the data. Not as secure now as it used to be but adequate to deter casual intruders.

WPA
Wi-Fi Protected Access - This is a more secure alternative to WEP. It still uses "keys" but these are generated from a master password and change automatically at pre-determined intervals. There is also a code buried in messages which authenticates the origin of the message. Ther are a number of ways to use WPA but the home user should select PSK mode and use a password of at least 20 characters.
To use WPA the client PCs must have Windows XP SP1 as a minimum.

Page 59 starts the wireless security configuration.

Passwords
You must make a record of the passwords and key phrases used to set up your wireless security and keep them somewhere (secure) where you can find them. If you loose them you will not be able to add new equipment to the network without reconfiguring the router and all the PCs afresh.

Enable AP or the wireless network won't work.

The first password/key to provide is the SSID (Service Set Identifier) this is basically the "name" of your wireless network. Something like MERTHYRBLUENET perhaps?

Then you select a channel - pick a number.

Select WPA security and select 'PSK String'. In the 'String' box enter your master password. Click Apply.

Decide whether you need to add the extra security of a MAC address access list.

Set the date and time on the router. Consider saving the router configuration to your hard drive.
That's it for the router. Set up WPA on your client PCs using the same details and you're done! :thumbsup:

Edited by Rimmer, 14 December 2005 - 06:33 PM.


Soltek QBIC, Pentium 4 3.0GHz, 512MB RAM, 200GB SATA HDD, ATI Radeon 9600XT 256MB, Netgear 54Mb/s WAP, ridiculously expensive Satellite Broadband
Windows XP Home SP2, Trend Micro Internet Security, Firefox, Thunderbird, AdAwareSE, Spybot S&D, SpywareBlaster, A-squared Free, Ewido Security Suite.

#8 merthyrblue

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 05:24 AM

Hello Rimmer
Sorry to be a pain in the butt!
Have carried out all the instructions as you suggested (with the exception of changing the SSID because i can't find where you change it) But nothing has taken. When i right click on the wireless icon and then click on "view available wireless networks" i am informed that: 'G604T_WIRELESS' is an 'Unsecured wireless network'?
This may seem a silly question but if i should succeed in setting up 'WPA' Security, how would i be able to enter to make future modifications? Big thanks for all the help so far. MB

#9 Rimmer

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 07:17 AM

Did you download the manual?

The SSID is the first option in the Wireless Security Configuration window, the window where you select your choices of None/WEP/WPA.

how would i be able to enter to make future modifications?


Hmmm... Are you telling me you only have wirless connected PCs/Notebooks? There is no wire-networked desktop? That's still okay, it's just something to bear in mind, it means you will have to be very systematic about what you change and make sure you have a record of every setting.
You are correct in what you imply, when you have entered (in the router config) the SSID, the channel, WPA and the WPA master password and click Apply your wireless notebook (or whatever) will be unable to communicate with the router. Then you need to configure the same security settings on the notebook. Enter the SSID, the channel, the WPA option, the master password, etc. When you apply that your notebook will once again be able to communicate with the router and you re-enter the router configuration page in your browser and continue to the next setting (if there is one).

:thumbsup:

Soltek QBIC, Pentium 4 3.0GHz, 512MB RAM, 200GB SATA HDD, ATI Radeon 9600XT 256MB, Netgear 54Mb/s WAP, ridiculously expensive Satellite Broadband
Windows XP Home SP2, Trend Micro Internet Security, Firefox, Thunderbird, AdAwareSE, Spybot S&D, SpywareBlaster, A-squared Free, Ewido Security Suite.




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