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2 separate LANs from 1 cable modem connection


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7 replies to this topic

#1 doggone

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 02:05 PM

Scenario:
1 internet connection coming into Suite As cable modem. Currently the cable modem has a CAT5 run to a Linksys Wireless Router (with 3 open LAN ports) to create Network A, which has 1 wired connection and 2 computers accessing it wirelessly.

Need:
Establish a second, separate LAN, Network B, next door in Suite B. Assume Suite A and Suite B are two different entities.

Solution: ?
My initial thought was to just plug a new CAT5 cable into an open port on Network As router and run the cable through the ceiling tiles and drop it into Suite B to connect Wireless Router B. However, this seems to me like it would just be an extension of Network A, and not the creation of Network B as desired.

Would a better option to get 2 separate LANs be to run the cable modem to a switch and then connect the two routers to the switch?

Please assume Im a complete novice and be as specific as possible, i.e. if I need to change LAN Bs ip address, tell me how. Thanks for any help you can offer on this!

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#2 thrillhouse

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 02:50 PM

Welcome to bc. This seems needlessly complicated and cable or not it will be too many users for the bandwidth of one cable modem. Why are you trying to do this?

#3 doggone

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 02:59 PM

  • 2 - 4 users on the connection at once is too many?
  • To split the monthly cost between Suite A and Suite B, which are two separate entities.


#4 thrillhouse

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:16 PM

1. The average US braodband speed is 4 mbps. Divide that by 4 computers all transfering data at the same time and it's 1 mbps. It will work but that speed won't justify the cost or hassle.

2. That doesn't make sense. How can they be separate if they are entwined financially?

If you are dead set on doing this, then go with your first option and run a router from the lan port of the router which is connected to the modem. The IP of this second router must be in range of the default gateway of the first one (which is connected to the modem). Then if you want to do any sharing make sure to only share files and printers amongst computers in your suite.

If they can't afford to cable connections get two dsl connections. It be will less headache and file and print sharing will be easier and it will be more secure. Hope this helps.

Edited by thrillhouse, 25 January 2011 - 03:18 PM.


#5 hamluis

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 04:08 PM

Well...I would just create two different workgroups, regardless of locations/numbers of users. It's the workgroups that determine accessibility on a network.

As for bandwidth, I suppose that should be a consideration.

Louis

#6 doggone

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 11:17 AM

thanks guys for the replies.

i tested the speed on the network and i get download speeds close to 15Mb/s and upload speeds hovering aroud 4.75Mb/s, so i think the bandwith is fine.

hamluis, if would creating two workgroups prevent 1 workgroup from seeing the other? or is there no security with workgroups?

#7 hamluis

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Posted 03 February 2011 - 12:22 PM

I wish I could answer...but I don't know, I've never tried it...sorry :).

But it logically makes sense to me.

Louis

#8 Sneakycyber

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 09:01 AM

From a networking standpoint You would start with the router connected to the DSL modem. Then connect 2 network switches to the ports 1 and 2 on the router. Each switch in each unit will connect all of the computers in that unit (or connect to a AP), you will assign each switch a static IP address through the router. For example the router IP address is 192.168.1.1. Switch one is 192.168.1.0 Switch 2 is 192.168.2.0. The Subnet Mask is 255.255.255.0. The switches use the Mac address to route information to each computer, the routers switch will have the IP address and Mac Address of each switch. Or you can assign different work groups and the pc's wont be able to "see" each other like Hamluis stated above.


Edit: Removed Reference to Integrated Service Routers (they are configured differently).

Edit:2 I have not tested this yet and I'm going off memory :whistle:

Edited by Sneakycyber, 06 February 2011 - 10:10 AM.

Chad Mockensturm 
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Certified CompTia Network +, A +




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