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compressed air for keyboard?


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#1 dominose

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 05:18 PM

I might get an air compressor to clean fans, inflate tires etc.
Would it work to clean out my laptop keyboard?
Somebody told me it might get water in the keyboard. It would have a regulator, of course.
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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 09:09 PM

Not sure I would recomend using a air compressor on anything computer related, keyboard maybe, but definetly not computer fans or the internals of the desktop-to much PSI. They sell canned air at most computer stores/walmarts, I would recomend those. And even then, use short, controlled bursts-hold the nozzle down to long and you will get moisture in your computer, and that is a bad thing.

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#3 dominose

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 11:55 PM

They sell canned air at most computer stores/walmarts


I know about "dusting air", but is there any reason that's better than an air compressor? I looked online a bit and I saw mention of people cleaning their keyboards with their air compressor and saying it worked fine. Is it risky?
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#4 AustrAlien

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 05:07 AM

"dusting air" .... that's a good one!

I have no qualms about using an air compressor. The more air the better: High pressure and large volume is good. I could not conceive of cleaning the insides of a computer box or a keyboard without using an air compressor.

Apart from a general "use due care" warning which could apply to just about anything I might do, the only precaution that I do take is to physically prevent any of the fans from spinning with either a finger or a skewer of some sort, when blowing air on them. The job is always done outside of course! There's usually plenty of dust and fluff flying everywhere. I have blown out many different computers this way and have yet to see the possibility of any risk associated with it. If I thought it was risky, I wouldn't be doing it.

I am aware that there are others with starkly different opinions and practices, related to the subject, but that is how I go about it. You will have to make your own mind up about this matter.
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#5 dominose

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:02 AM

I have no qualms about using an air compressor, the only precaution that I do take is to physically prevent any of the fans from spinning with either a finger or a skewer of some sort, when blowing air on them.


That seems like a good idea with fans in general: the compressed air pushing the fan might force the mechanism and damage it somehow.
thanks,
Laura

#6 Animal

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 01:10 PM

Compressed air has a higher volume of water vapor relative to the ambient air temperature. This is why it is not recommended to use a 'regular' air compressor to clean out a computer. There are special ones that have inline dryers for that, that can be used for general electronic cleaning. As well as the 'canned' air that is not the same properties as breathable air.

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#7 dominose

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 01:54 PM

Compressed air has a higher volume of water vapor relative to the ambient air temperature. This is why it is not recommended to use a 'regular' air compressor to clean out a computer.


It might depend on the humidity of the air that goes into an air compressor. If you're in a dry climate or you use a dehumidifier - like me, I keep the relative humidity below 50% - maybe it works, and if you're compressing humid air maybe you'd get water droplets in the air compressor.
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#8 ThunderZ

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 05:59 PM

As well as the 'canned' air that is not the same properties as breathable air.


That is the major difference and the one I would be most concerned about when deciding to use a compressor instead of canned air specific to the purpose.

#9 AustrAlien

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 01:11 AM

the compressed air pushing the fan might force the mechanism and damage it somehow.

Laura

It is more to do with preventing the generation of electrical current (and consequent damage to other components) that may be caused by the fan spinning, than it is to do with physical damage to the fan mechanism itself.
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#10 nbtseven

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 07:32 AM

Laura Have you ever used an air compressor before? Or owned one? Well as with most air compressors they accumulate a lot of water in the bottom of the tank, which would really make me question if I wanted to use it on my computer or not. Now this happens to us here and we live in a very dry climate, so I could only imagine what it would be like else where.

I would not recommend it, but do recommend the canned air you buy for electronics. Now this is just me...

#11 dominose

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 05:54 PM

What do people in computer repair shops use, I wonder?
No, I haven't owned an air compressor.
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#12 Eyesee

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 06:26 PM

I have a shop and I use compressed air and a car detail brush. A toothbrush would work too.
Check your local Big Lots or Dollar Store if you have one in your area.
They usually carry compressed air pretty cheap.

AutstrAlien is right about the potential for the fan spinning generating electrical current so block them somehow.
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#13 dominose

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 10:50 PM

I have a shop and I use compressed air

You mean, you use the cans?

#14 ThunderZ

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 11:55 PM

I have found something similar these very handy in helping to clean keyboards of all types. Pretty cheap and can be found at most drug stores in the dental dept.

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#15 killerx525

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 12:00 AM

You can also use a brush to clean out the keyboard.

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