Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Gaming Computer build


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 LearningDrone

LearningDrone

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:10:49 AM

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:38 AM

I'm about to build a new gaming desktop and I was wondering if there would be any issues/bottlenecks with the parts I selected, and if there is sufficient cooling for a light cpu overclock.

Intel Core i5 2500K Quad Core Processor & ASUS P8P67 Evo Motherboard
Mushkin Enhanced Silverline Stiletto 4GB
Antec Three Hundred Mini Tower Gaming Case with all optional fans installed that deliver 69 CFM @ 2000 RPM
Noctua NH-U9B SE2
Corsair HX1000W (in case I sli in the future)
EVGA GeForce GTX 570 Fermi 732MHZ 1280MB
And a HDD @ 7200RPM

I think I listed all the parts that will determine the temperature control and gaming capability of the computer.
Thanks,
LearningDrone

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:49 PM

Posted 21 January 2011 - 02:03 AM

What sort of games are you going to be playing on this PC and what sort of budget are you looking at? Since you're in Canada, the prices will be slightly higher than they are in the US. You may want to wait until the LGA 2011 motherboards come out a bit later, those will be higher-end parts. You could also wait until AMD starts to launch the Bulldozer platform sometime around March when CeBIT occurs. The current Sandy Bridge parts are excellent overclokers from what I've seen, though, they are a tad expensive, but that isn't uncommon for Intel. Since you are going for higher-end, and thus longer, graphics cards, a full ATX tower would be best. Also, the Radeon 6970 performs a bit faster than a GTX 570. You also need an operating system for this PC.

3939.png

 


#3 LearningDrone

LearningDrone
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:10:49 AM

Posted 21 January 2011 - 03:13 AM

Thanks for the quick reply. As for games I'm not sure right now but I would like it so that my computer would be able to last me for about ~5 years worth of gaming or be good enough to handle DOTA2(upcoming and the requirements for that game are pretty vague so I'm not sure how useful this is) on high/extreme without problems (not sure if that made sense). An example is that my 6600gt lasted for about 6-7 years, up until SC2 but I haven't really tried any other games, which I was pretty happy with and I'm trying to aim for that lifetime with the new computer as well. As for budget I'm trying to limit myself to $1500 which my build I listed above meets it at. As for waiting, I would prefer to get my new computer now. For OS, it'll be Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit, and the reason I picked the 570 over the 6970 was for EVGA's lifetime warranty. As for case, the video card will fit. As for longer cards, they will just poke into the HDD bays and I'll be only using 2, at most, out of the 6 HDD bays. I may get an SSD as I think the 7200RPM HDD will bottleneck but correct me if I'm wrong.

In an attempt to save money, I may swap out the 2500k for a 2300, the 570 for a 460, and a lower watt PSU while keeping everything else pretty much the same. I was wondering if SLI'ing 2-460's would be too much for a 2300. If so would 1-460 be good for a 2300 or would you have any recommendations around either the 460(preferred if it was a 2-way SLI) or the 2300?

Edited by LearningDrone, 21 January 2011 - 05:13 AM.


#4 dpunisher

dpunisher

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,234 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South TX
  • Local time:12:49 PM

Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:54 PM

As to the original build, Only thing I would question is the PSU choice. AX1200 is a better choice. If you look around, you can find it for ~$30 more than an HX1000 after rebates. AX1200 is just a better, more efficient unit.

Mobo and CPU, great choice. Ks are unlocked so the sky is the limit on those. I have seen overclocks to 4.3-4.5ghz easy on those.

Videocards- I would honestly wait around for the 560GTX to arrive in February. Lots of price competition in the $150-$200 sector now and if NV wants to play, the 560 might be a great midrange card to go SLI.

Edited by dpunisher, 21 January 2011 - 07:28 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#5 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:49 PM

Posted 22 January 2011 - 01:26 AM

Be careful with longer cards, some cases have the hard drive bays in a cage. Depending on the case, it may be near impossible to install the GPU, I had this issue with a Lian-Li case. Lifetime warranties are indeed nice, but largely unnecessary given the rapid rate in which new cards develop, you would probably be upgrading before the card actually breaks. As for the SSD's, once a game is loaded into RAM, the hard drive is rarely used to load large amounts of game data, besides, to get one of sufficient size to hold all of your games would be quite expensive. It would be best to use one SSD for the OS, and a standard drive for data and applications. BTW, is there any particular reason for you choosing Windows 7 Ultimate? I ask becuase, unless you are running enterprise-level applications or have obscure business needs, like EFS, Home Premium is all you need and it is less expensive. The GTX 560's are slated to be released by the end of January, I'm not sure if this will be a soft launch or not. At any rate, that card is designed to go up against the Radeon 6800 line.

3939.png

 


#6 LearningDrone

LearningDrone
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:10:49 AM

Posted 24 January 2011 - 03:03 AM

Thanks for all the replies so far. There was some crazy sale where I am so I picked up whatever I could from it, and I got a Sapphire 5970, Coolermaster Haf 922 case(and yes the 5970 fits as long as I give up a HDD bay which I'm more than willing to do), WD caviar blue 2TB, and an OCZ vertex 60gb ssd. As for the other parts, they are pretty much the same build in my first post with the exception that the psu is a 700W instead of a 1000W as I don't plan on crossfiring my 5970. As for windows, the reason I picked ultimate over home was that there was a sale on the ultimate that was the same price as home so I was thinking "why not get it for the same price?"
Also, I was wondering if my 700W psu is enough for this build with a window to oc my gpu and cpu?

Edited by LearningDrone, 24 January 2011 - 04:12 PM.


#7 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:49 PM

Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:25 PM

Are you getting a Radeon 5970 or a 6970? Both are good cards, but the 5970 is just two 5850's on one card, which is basically Crossfire, complete with the benefits and limitations thereof. Two Radeon 6950's are a little more powerful than a 5970 for about the same price. Where was this sale on Ultimate? That is a steal, even though you probably won't use what makes Ultimate different. As for the PSU, if you are going to use two 6950's, a 750W PSU or greater is suggested.

3939.png

 


#8 LearningDrone

LearningDrone
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:10:49 AM

Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:29 AM

I got a 5970 for practically half price and since Coolermaster Haf 922 could hold the card and that was also on sale, I felt like I just had to get both of them. As for windows, the sale is over but it was from ncix. Also, for psu I read somewhere on google that I should aim for something that's ~20% higher than what I need due to the decline in performance over time or something which I don't really get, does that mean I need 650W*1.20=780W+? or am I misinterpreting it?

Edited by LearningDrone, 25 January 2011 - 11:29 AM.


#9 dpunisher

dpunisher

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,234 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South TX
  • Local time:12:49 PM

Posted 25 January 2011 - 12:47 PM

For PSUs, I go for the 60% rule.

Fully loaded your system should pull about 60% of the PSU's rating.

Just as an example: A 5970 pulls ~300 watts fully loaded, with an overclocked CPU, fans, drives figure another 170 watts, 470 watts total (thats being generous, most systems are quite a bit lower). A 750 watt PSU would be happy, and leave a bit of headroom for expansion. Nothing against going bigger than you need, an 850 watt would be happy as well.

Most of the power calculators you find oversestimate the power required, as they are building in a "safety cushion". In an ideal world the PSU would need to function between 40-60% load for max efficiency, and to keep heat down. This all assumes a quality PSU like Corsair/Antec/Seasonic etc.

PSUs are one thing you eventually learn not to "cheap out" on. Nothing worse than wasting time chasing down stability problems caused by lame power supplies. If you get a top quality PSU now, it will go through 2 or more system upgrades without a problem (unless connectors change.....again).

Edited by dpunisher, 25 January 2011 - 12:48 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#10 LearningDrone

LearningDrone
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:10:49 AM

Posted 26 January 2011 - 01:07 AM

Oh, so the psu calculators already consider the extra watts that are recommended? This is the calculator I used to calculate my watts, and this is the psu I picked for my build.

Edited by LearningDrone, 26 January 2011 - 01:10 AM.


#11 dpunisher

dpunisher

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,234 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South TX
  • Local time:12:49 PM

Posted 26 January 2011 - 02:11 AM

http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine The smaller number in black usually runs about 10% over reality.

Don't know why you would mess with that 700 watt refurb OCZ unit, older design, mediocre specs.

Best bargain in Canada now for ~700 watt PSU: http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207003 $99 after rebate, Seasonic OEM

I wouldn't kick any of the top 5 out of my builds: http://www.newegg.ca/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007656%20600014023&IsNodeId=1&name=701W%20-%20800W

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#12 LearningDrone

LearningDrone
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:10:49 AM

Posted 26 January 2011 - 09:17 PM

Well I learned something new about PSU; however I already brought the one I link so it seems like I'm stuck with it. Any advice on what I should do now or in the future? Or what I should look out for when the PSU is dying so I'll know when to replace it?

Edited by LearningDrone, 26 January 2011 - 10:51 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users