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I think I destroyed my Processor!!


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#1 neo9999

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 12:11 AM

I have a Dell Dimension 4400 Desktop that I purchased back in 2002. A few days ago, I shut the power off at the fuse box to put in a new light switch to my bathroom. I forgot that my computer was on at the time. When I finished I noticed that the computer was on, but all i got was a black screen. Now, afetr some troubleshooting I've determined this: 1). The BIOS and by extension the CRT monitor works because I can access CMOS settings 2). Periphery devices such as DVD-ROMS and Hard Disk Drives are working because I get no error messages from the POST(power on self test)and the LEDs indicate that they are getting power. I have tried booting from both the hard drive and my DVD-rom. Each time the computer shuts down, restarts, and all I get is a black screen. I've tried awapping my 1GB RAM out for an older 256MB stuck that I assume is still ok, and I get the same thing. If my RAM is fried then thats and easy fix, but if its my processor then how do I tell?

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#2 killerx525

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 12:16 AM

You try another power supply.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 12:21 AM

I would try another PSU as well if available, if not I can guide you through the steps of testing the one you have.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#4 neo9999

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 01:10 AM

Really, you think its the PSU. Well, thx, I'll give that a try.

#5 killerx525

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 02:16 AM

From what you are describing, it might be the psu.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 07:36 AM

Cpus rarely fail. Its possible but unlikely those symptoms sound very much like a power supply but in any case its best to try all possibilities so that ur not wasting money on parts you don't need and still have the problem

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#7 troublesh00ter

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 04:03 PM

the_patriot09 is right... it is most likely the power supply.

If the_patriot09 doesn't mind, I already have a power supply self test guide written that I can submit to you. But it has to be cool with him. I wouldn't want to steal his thunder ;)

You are completing POST and entering BIOS so it's not the processor. You wouldn't POST if the CPU was fried.
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#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 04:34 PM

hehe go ahead, saves me the trouble of hunting my guide down. :D

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 neo9999

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 11:51 PM

Goose! How does this 'self test guide' work? Also, thx for the help everyone. I was freaking out for days. I'll try replacing the psu when i get home.

#10 killerx525

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 12:14 AM

You could borrow a spare psu from a friend or from a relative.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#11 datastream

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 12:31 AM

i would also agree with the power supply, but you could try clearing the cmos first. take out the cmos battery and the ram, unplug the machine, and then hold the power button down for about 5 seconds to discharge all the electricity in the system. after that put all of the components back in, plug it in and try to boot.

#12 troublesh00ter

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 03:25 PM

It's just a self help guide that I wrote in OpenOffice. I've got a lot of self help guides for hardware and several very specific errors in Windows ;)

I'd have to email it or put it up somewhere for you to download.
for3ver,
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#13 the_patriot11

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:20 PM

eh found it this is easier I think.

When a computer begins the boot process the motherboard initiates the start up of the PSU. Because of this it is difficult to determine whether the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU when a computer shows no signs of starting up. The purpose of the procedure is to determine if the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

This test is for ATX PSUs. Some manufacturers use non-ATX PSUs with 20/24 pin connectors that do not have the same pinout as a ATX PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image
www.playtool.com

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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