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could my cpu be fried need some advice


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#1 DerBear89

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 05:16 PM

hey guys, a few months ago my computer failed completely after numerous amounts of trouble shooting, and repair shop visits we have narrowed it down to a few possibilities. here is a brief description of what happened. computer was working fine then i upgraded the psu from 500 to 750 watts. upon the installation the computer turned on for maybe a second then would not turn on again at all. i have sent the psu and motherboard back to there respected dealers to cash in the warranties. I guess my question is is it possible that my processor was fried? i really would not like a call from either of them telling me that there was no problem. running an intel i3. i inspected all parts and saw no burns everything looked fine from my eyes.

and yes i swapped the old psu back in and it still did not turn on. no signs of life at all. they either said the motherboard was damaged or the psu

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:25 PM

I'm not a hardware person...but what you stated makes no sense.

A change of PSU should have no impact on any component, since components only draw what they need. Of course, not all PSUs are made equal...if you went from one which was capable...to an inferior...no, I can't even imagine a PSU made that poorly.

Bottom line, IMO...whatever components failed...probably were going to fail anyway.

If I had to put money on a component failing...PSUs would rank ahead of motherboards...and CPUs would be the last item I would suspect.

Louis

#3 pachm

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:39 PM

I would suggest resetting the BIOS with the jumpers on the mobo if that don't work, try to force the power supply by jumping the green wire to ground, any black in the harness.

#4 DerBear89

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:43 PM

I'm not a hardware person...but what you stated makes no sense.

A change of PSU should have no impact on any component, since components only draw what they need. Of course, not all PSUs are made equal...if you went from one which was capable...to an inferior...no, I can't even imagine a PSU made that poorly.

Bottom line, IMO...whatever components failed...probably were going to fail anyway.

If I had to put money on a component failing...PSUs would rank ahead of motherboards...and CPUs would be the last item I would suspect.

Louis



lol thank you that strangely made me feel much better. Sorry if it didn't make sense I'm just telling you the facts of what happened. The pc repair place i believe concluded that the extra 250 watts distributed incorrectly causing the motherboard to fail. I'm just playing the waiting game. I am just worried that i would have to take advantage of intel's outstanding warranty service and i do not want to abuse that.

#5 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 08:31 PM

Ive seen Defective PSUs fry other components, especially motherboards, if the PSU came with a short. . . In theory, a Faulty PSU has the possibility of frying every component you have though its rare they cause that much damage, if any at all, but that is why I recomend people never skimp on the PSU or the motherboard, spend the extra $$ on the name brand high rated PSU and boards. I suspect That in this case it was just the motherboard-but theres no way of verifying that until you get the replacement parts unless you have another system to drop the CPU into. Though I will say this, typically when a PSU shorts out and causes damage, theres usually fry marks on the affected hardware.

Edited by the_patriot09, 19 January 2011 - 08:32 PM.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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