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Netstat tells me foreign ip address is *:* ?


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#1 greenisorabracadabra

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 12:54 PM

Hello,

I just ran netstat and I found that there are multiple foreign addresses identified as "*:*" which may or may not be connected to my computer. Netstat does not describe the "state" of the connection for these addresses; it leaves them blank. Does anyone know why the addresses are described as *:* ?

Cordially,
Abra

Edited by Blade Zephon, 16 January 2011 - 12:21 AM.
Moved from XP to Networking. ~BZ


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#2 Nate15329

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 11:04 PM

Those are just open UDP ports and doesn't matter what the foreign address is cause UDP protocol doesn't connect directly to a single address. UDP protocol just sends the data to the destination and hopes it reaches to the destination. It doesn't matter if it loses parts of the data. This type of protocol is mostly used for video and audio streams(like IP phones and Television) cause it's fast. Unfortunately, it's unreliable in transmission because along the way, packets are lost and the video or audio streams won't be complete. For video and audio streams, it's not a big problem, the user won't tell if a single video frame was lost due to the fact that video has at least 25 frames per second and the human eye and mind won't notice. Same with live audio, there maybe a white noise on the line if it ends up being enough packets lost for the user to notice.

#3 greenisorabracadabra

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 11:26 AM

Thank you for your response.




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