Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Windows 7 Aero


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 troublesh00ter

troublesh00ter

  • Members
  • 561 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Deep South
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 11 January 2011 - 10:53 AM

I've been reading a lot of Windows manual optimization guides that suggest disabling Windows Aero to increase system performance. This simply is absolutely, for surely, can't be any more not true because it's total garbage (and it's just not true). Do not disable Aero if you wish to achieve greater system performance.

Aero was a good idea. Why?

Ok so here's what this thing actually does... Aero provides a way for the user interface (windows, taskbar, widgets, background, etc.) to be recognized as a GPU task instead of a CPU task.

Why is this a big deal?

It just so happens that your GPU (Graphical Processing Unit) is better at handling graphical elements than the CPU (central processing unit). Who woulda thunk it?

Disabling Aero will force the CPU to take over rendering of the UI which is more work than it needs. It's already processing instructions such as services and applications. Disabling Aero gives the CPU more work and will slow your system down. I guarantee that disabling Windows Aero will make your computer slower. I don't even have a heavy GPU. All I've got is some stupid, worthless Intel Graphics Accelerator Chipset garbage and it still proceses the UI with Aero enabled better than the CUP does when Aero is turned off. And if you know anything about these dumb Intel chipsets, you'll know just how impressive this is... and shocking too.

Soooo..... DON'T DO IT!!! :)

Mkay... thanks buh bye.
for3ver,
goose90proof

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 666philb

666philb

  • Members
  • 130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:uk
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 11 January 2011 - 02:35 PM

Oh! so that's the reason why the classic theme is slower than aero. i was wondering.

cheers goose90proof

Edited by 666philb, 11 January 2011 - 02:37 PM.


#3 troublesh00ter

troublesh00ter
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 561 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Deep South
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 13 January 2011 - 09:29 AM

You can disable many of the enhanced graphical effects of Aero such as transparency (transparency requires extra, unnecessary rendering), the fancy window movement enhancements and all that other stuff without losing Aero. This will help you increase performance but you typically want to keep Aero enabled.
for3ver,
goose90proof

#4 Brockishh

Brockishh

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 13 January 2011 - 11:36 AM

Aero FTW! :clapping:
Laptop
HP G60
Operating System
Windows 7 Ultimate
CPU
AMD Athlon X2 QL-62 2.00 GHz
Video
NVIDIA GeForce 8200M G 128MB
Ram
3GB Ram
Programs
Adobe Photoshop CS4
Adobe Lightroom 3
Cyberlink Powerdirector 8
--
Brockishh

#5 mhoss49

mhoss49

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Breese, Il.
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 13 January 2011 - 08:07 PM

Please forgive if I misunderstand. I had to go into personalize and switch from windows 7 aero to windows 7 basic in order for the filter [ vanishing point ] in photoshop cs3 to stop crashing. Is my switching to windows 7 basic the same as disabling aero? Are you talking about a more sever disable? Thanks mhoss49

#6 troublesh00ter

troublesh00ter
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 561 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Deep South
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 18 January 2011 - 05:05 PM

Yes, switching to Windows 7 basic is the same as disabling Aero. However, if you are disabling Aero in order to maintain stability, I would think that this is acceptable. Although, photoshop should run better with Aero disabled. If you have the minimum required hardware though, you may have problems running photoshop altogether, Aero or no Aero.

If disabling Aero by switching to Windows 7 basic makes photoshop more stable.... do it.

An alternate method to test would be to use the Aero theme but completely disable desktop background. Disabling the background may help photoshop render better.

By the way, filters in photoshop or in any graphic editing application are one of the more heavy duty features. If your hardware only meats minimum requirements, you may experience poor performance.

I've always recommended doing graphical editing on a computer with at least a dual core and at least 2 GB of RAM. Although the application can be run on less, to get decent performance.

Ideally, the best recommendation I can give for doing graphical editing is to have a quad core CPU like one of the newer Intels (Core i3 is a good place to start). I couldn't ever imagine running any computer on less than 4 GB of RAM (just the way I roll) but some users running 32 bit XP have never even experience any more than 1 GB of RAM (and that's high ballin' it).
for3ver,
goose90proof




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users