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broken motherboard connector


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9 replies to this topic

#1 MidiGlitch

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 10:38 AM

The fan on my laptop (HP NW 8000) needs replacing so I downloaded the service manual, ordered a fan and got to work.

All was well until the very last step, disconnecting the fan cable from the motherboard and I ended up pulling the connector off the board.
Two questions: Are these connectors generally solderless, i.e. so long as I align the connector correctly it will automatically connect to the motherboard wires, or
Have I probably snapped the connecting wires and need to resolder them?

At first glance it's hard to tell if I snapped them or not though I guess (and hope) I did not, just by looking at the design.

The female connector that I pulled off the board was held onto the board by a couple of copper L-shaped clips that were fixed onto the board and that the connector slid onto. Should I superglue these clips back onto the board or is there a better alternative?

Thx

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#2 Yoshistr

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 11:10 AM

Can you take a picture of what it looks like and upload it?

You said you pulled the connector off the motherboard, did you mean the white/black plastic part that is soldered onto the motherboard (which is what it sounded like).

Also you said it was copper clips that held the part to the board, was it a mechanical connection
or was it an electrical one (most likely case).
If it was electrical you said it had copper clips holding it down, by copper did you mean yellow/gold/dark brown connections?

I believe a picture will be better to figure out what occurred.
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#3 dpunisher

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 11:42 AM

If you just pulled/slid the plastic connector off of the 3-4 pins, and the pins are OK, you should be good to go. I admit to having done this a couple times. Main thing you are worried about are the pins. If the pins pulled out from the board, you are in trouble unless your soldering skills are happy. Pics?

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#4 MidiGlitch

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:48 AM

apols..I'll post a pic tomorrow..thanks for the interest so far :)

#5 Yoshistr

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 12:45 PM

It sounds like you meant the heat sink fan that you were replacing (usually the large fan on top of a heat sink
that keeps the cpu at operating temperatures).

Most motherboards have two L-shaped metal snap-ins that hold the heat sink over the cpu which the fan sits on top of.
If this is the case simply pull the heat sink up, clean out any dust and replace it, pull the clips over it and fit them onto the board where they normally fit into.

If this is not the case and it was a secondary fan you were replacing or the connection was actually on the motherboard where the fan's power input plugs into then we will need a picture to see what is going on.
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#6 MidiGlitch

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:03 PM

k guys:

here's a link to 3 pictures (sorry for the slight blur, I didn't have a tripod). Two are of the connector that I pulled off and the other the location on the motherboard where it should go. There seems to be no glue or anything that holds the copper clips in place, so maybe I just need to try and pop them back in?

and yes, the connector is for the power supply to the fan.

thanks again for the help

S

http://img560.imageshack.us/g/connectorbottom.jpg/

#7 Sneakycyber

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:17 PM

You pulled the entire connector off the board and broke the solder joints (how hard did you pull?). You will need to solder a new connector back on the board which may be impossible if its surface mount.

Edit: I looks like you could connect it back to the board by heating up the copper pad hold downs with a soldering iron but I can't see how the pins connect to the board, if its a solder connection for the pins as well you may be out of luck since you can't heat them up under the plug and solder it to the board at the same time.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 12 January 2011 - 08:20 PM.

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#8 MidiGlitch

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 08:00 AM

thx for the reply. I'll try the heating up the pads trick. I was hoping that I could solder the wires where they broke (the connector still has small wire stubs) once I fastened the connector back to the board. But TBH, it is a pretty fiddly job and needs a very thin soldering iron; might be more than I'm capable of.

I didn't actually pull the connector that hard, but it an old machine and probably hadn't been disconnected since it was built.

S

#9 Sneakycyber

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 10:16 AM

Might be easier to just bypass the plug and solder the wires for the fan directly to the board, would save you from having to replace the board if the above doesn't work.
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#10 Yoshistr

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 01:35 PM

That looks pretty bad, be careful when soldering on a motherboard, make sure you are grounded and take care not to put solder on any components you are not working with or on the board itself.
I am still a little confused because you said it was the connection from the fan to the power supply via the motherboard, can you possibly install a secondary fan directly plugged into the psu using a molex cable rather than having a fan the is cpu modulated?
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