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Choosing an antivirus software


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#1 spinnell

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 06:39 PM

hello all,
I have just freshly installed (clean) Win 7 after a vicious virus attack. The IT dept at my husband's company cleaned and re-installed for me. I was told "every file in the computer is infected" Previous to this I thought I had good, even better than good, protection. I was using AVG free, I did regular scans with Spybot S&D, Malewarebyte's Antimaleware... I also kept my system clean with CCleaner and TweakNow Power Pack 2010. When the guy at the IT dept asked, in his pretentious voice, "how could you not have decent virus protection?" I was speechless... I thought I had better than decent. I have been through classes for pc repair, I do know quite a bit about computers.

When they did my reinstall, I got my laptop back with Avast! Pro. (any thoughts?) I have no intention on paying for this, so I really really need some opinions and advice on what to use.

Thanks in advance for any input :)

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#2 asdreader

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 06:48 PM

Hi,

I agree with you about not wanting to pay for antivirus. I have used AVG before as well, I have also used Avast and Avira. I even used McAffee for a bit (it was free from my ISP). I feel like AVG is not as good now as it used to be, I had trouble with it the last time I had it. Personally, I use the free version of Avast right now. It seems to work very well, I have not had any problems since I started using it. I have never had the Pro version, but I know the free version is pretty good. I would just download the free version, then uninstall the Pro version and put the free version on. Also, keep using Malwarebytes and Spybot, both are good to have in addition to a good antivirus program.

Good Luck!

#3 quietman7

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 04:44 PM

Choosing an anti-virus is a matter of personal preference, your needs, your needs, your technical ability and experience, features offered, user friendliness, ease of updating (and upgrading to new program release), ease of installation/removal, available technical support from the vendor and price. Other factors to consider include detection rates and methods, scanning engine effectiveness, how often virus definitions are updated, the amount of resources the program utilizes, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular anti-virus that works well for one person may not work as well for another. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone and there is no best anti-virus. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your needs. For more specific information to consider, please read Choosing Your Anti-virus Software.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. Just because one anti-virus detected threats that another missed, does not mean its more effective. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense, safe computing and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.


My personal choice is NOD32 Anti-Virus if choosing a paid for program as it leaves a small foortprint or one of the following if choosing a free alternative.
Supplement your anti-virus by performing scans with trustworthy security tools like:You can also get a second opinion by performing an Online Virus Scan.

I have been disappointed with AVG ever since they made a decision in April 2010 to partner with LimeWire and promote the use of peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing, a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, and exposure of personal information.

With the release of AVG 2011, there have been numerous complaints about issues and conflicts with other security tools like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware. Unlike previous versions, AVG 2011 cannot be effectively disabled to prevent it from interfering with other security tools...after restarting the computer, AVG re-enables all protections. Read these related discussions:There have been reports of issues with the computer starting properly on 64-bit Windows sytems for which AVG has had to release these fix instructions.

There have also been reported problems with computers after using new features like PC Analyzer and PC Tuneup which purport to fix registry errors in order to make the system more stable and various optimizing tools which can make changes to system settings.

I do not recommend the routine use of registry cleaners/optimizers as they are extremely powerful applications that can damage the Windows registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from booting properly. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.

Even MajorGeeks, a popular download hosting site has issued a Statement on AVG Free 2011 and recommends using other free alternatives.

For these reasons, I no longer recommend AVG as a free alternative.

Edited by quietman7, 08 January 2011 - 04:45 PM.

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#4 spinnell

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 12:52 PM

thanks for the input.. guess I'll stick with avast for now. one more question. I was under the impression that only one antivirus program should be used at a time. Since I got my laptop back it has both Avast! Pro and Microsoft Security Essentials... is this okay? It doesn't seem to be causing any problems.

#5 quietman7

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 12:56 PM

Using more than one anti-virus program is not advisable. Why? The primary concern with doing so is due to conflicts that can arise when they are running in real-time mode simultaneously and issues with Windows resource management. Even when one of them is disabled for use as a stand-alone scanner, it can affect the other and cause conflicts. Anti-virus software components insert themselves into the operating systems core and using more than one can cause instability, crash your computer, slow performance and waste system resources. When actively running in the background while connected to the Internet, they both may try to update their definition databases at the same time. As the programs compete for resources required to download the necessary files this often can result in sluggish system performance or unresponsive behavior.

Each anti-virus may interpret the activity of the other as suspicious behavior and there is a greater chance of them alerting you to a "False Positive". If one finds a virus or a suspicious file and then the other also finds the same, both programs will be competing over exclusive rights on dealing with that virus or suspicious file. Each anti-virus may attempt to remove the offending file and quarantine it at the same time resulting in a resource management issue as to which program gets permission to act first. If one anit-virus finds and quarantines the file before the other one does, then you encounter the problem of both wanting to scan each other's zipped or archived files and each reporting the other's quarantined contents. This can lead to a repetitive cycle of endless alerts that continually warn you that a threat has been found when that is not the case.

Anti-virus scanners use virus definitions to check for malware and these can include a fragment of the virus code which may be recognized by other anti-virus programs as the virus itself. Because of this, most anti-virus programs encrypt their definitions so that they do not trigger a false alarm when scanned by other security programs. Other vendors do not encrypt their definitions and they can trigger false alarms when detected by the resident anti-virus. Further, dual installation is not always possible because most of the newer anti-virus programs will detect the presence of others and may insist they be removed prior to download and installation of another. If the installation does complete with another anti-virus already installed, you may encounter issues like system freezing, unresponsiveness or similar symptoms while trying to use it.

To avoid these problems, use only one anti-virus solution. Deciding which one to remove is your choice. Be aware that you may lose your subscription to that anti-virus program's virus definitions once you uninstall that software.

Anti-virus vendors recommend that you install and run only one anti-virus program at a timeYou can always supplement your anti-virus by performing an Online Virus Scan.
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#6 SMASHING-WINDOWS

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 01:26 AM

I rather you use avg its so awesome :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping:
I really love smashing windows




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