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Linux on a Stick


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7 replies to this topic

Poll: Linux on a Stick (27 member(s) have cast votes)

Have you ever used a linux on a stick?

  1. Yes (21 votes [77.78%])

    Percentage of vote: 77.78%

  2. No (6 votes [22.22%])

    Percentage of vote: 22.22%

  3. What is it? (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#1 T-man356

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 10:02 AM

Here is a Topic devoted to talking about Linux on a stick! Many distros can be put on and made bootable on a flash drive including Ubuntu, Puppy linux, xPUD, Redhat, and many others! This topic is for posting ways to do it, new distros that it is possible on, and questions/comments.

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#2 1002 Richard S

1002 Richard S

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 10:34 AM

Very good guide here http://www.pendrivelinux.com/ I've used it often.

Ubuntu specific https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/FromUSBStick

Good guide here too http://www.webupd8.org/2010/03/how-to-create-multiboot-liveusb-using.html

Hope these help?

Richard

#3 jumpyjester

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 02:54 PM

A good way to run multiple ISO images is http://www.pendrivelinux.com/boot-multiple-iso-from-usb-multiboot-usb/ this allows you to setup yoour key to boot and to run multiple OS images i used it to make a hard drive restorer with DBAN, UBCD and clonezilla.

well worth a look and simple to use.
Regards,

John

#4 toolman638

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 10:01 AM

I rescued an old Gateway 3562 laptop with XP that would no longer boot.(no recovery disks). I used a free program called Sardu(just google it) which can download the Linux Ubuntu 10.10 setup ISO, and then run a trial version on a ram disk from the flash drive without installing any files on disk. I liked Ubuntu so much I then opted for a full install from the same Flash drive. I am now surfing the web faster than Windows ever dreamed of and I did not have to download all those updates from microsoft.

#5 raw

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 09:27 AM

My flash drive has BackTrack3,0phcrack(with tables) and ntpasswd.
Quick way to make a bootable linux flash is unetbootin.
http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

qemu is a nice emulator to test your new flash os.
qemu -hda /dev/sda

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 rawcreations.net          @raw_creations


Current systems: WHAT OS, BackTrack-raw, PCLinuxOS, Peppermint OS 6, Kali Linux

and a custom Linux From Scratch server hosting a bunch of top secret stuff.


#6 pane-free

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 01:53 AM

Thank you, toolman638, for the www.sarducd.it link -- had not seen it before.

Tit-for-tat, here's another you may not have seen -- http://ultilex.linux-bg.org/
for which all one has to do is copy to a partition and then run an included script file to have "The Ultimate Linux Experience," which includes :

Slax version 6.1.2
Puppy Linux version 5.0.1
Tiny Core version 3.0
System Rescue CD version 1.5.8
Parted Magic version 5.2
boot.kernel.org (BKO)

I use the Command Line to clean up USB Flash Drives corrupted for whatever reason, first writing with zeros then partitoning if desired, then creating the filesystem (usu. FAT32) --

Make a bootable USB stick using Linux only
LiveUSB

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Both methods below are performed at the Terminal
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

SIMPLE COMMAND LINE METHOD

USB stick is functional; all existing data will be replaced with the chosen ISO --



1. Download your chosen ISO file, noting the path to where it was downloaded (i.e. /home/username/Downloads/)

2. Insert your USB stick and learn how it is recognized by the system, To do so, enter the command:

sudo ls -l /dev/disk/by-id/*usb* (or eliminate "sudo" if entering as root)


This should produce output along the lines of:

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 9 2010-03-15 22:54 /dev/disk/by-id/usb-_USB_DISK_2.0_077508380189-0:0
-> ../../sdb
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2010-03-15 22:54 /dev/disk/by-id/usb-_USB_DISK_2.0_077508380189-0:0-
part1 -> ../../sdb1


3. Unmount the usb stick (NOTE: replace the X in sdX with whatever was returned in the first line
from command above)

sudo umount /dev/sdX


4. Use this command to write (as root) the image iso to your USB stick:

dd if=/path/to/your/distro.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=4M;sync



You should now have a bootable USB stick of your chosen Operating System.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
COMPLEX COMMAND LINE METHOD

USB stick is corrupted and/or it needs to be made recognizable;
install a bootable distro to a USB stick previously formatted to NTFS --



1. Download your chosen distro ISO file, noting the path (i.e. /home/username/Downloads/)

2. Physically uninstall/unplug all other USB devices from the computer and do not use a USB hub.

3. Insert your USB stick and learn how your USB stick is recognized by the system (as #2 above)

4. sudo umount /dev/sdX

5. dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX bs=512 conv=notrunc,sync

This will wipe your entire USB drive with zeros, destroy all existing data
and TAKE A WHILE!

6. Partitioning and Formatting your USB Drive with cfdisk as a single partition using FAT32
NOTE: Please refer to http://manual.aptosid.com/en/part-cfdisk-en.htm

cfdisk /dev/sdX This starts the cfdisk Disk Partitioning program


A. Delete all existing partitions using arrow keys to highlight each --

"d" or "Delete" <Enter>


B. Create a new partition

"n" or "New" <Enter> choose "Primary Partition"
NOTE: "Units" (MB)-- entire USB drive <Enter>
"t" or "Type" <Enter> choose "0B" (FAT32) <Enter>
"b" or "Boot" <Enter> NOTE: toggle until "Boot" flag remains visible
"W" or "Write" <Enter> NOTE: if you don't do this you'll have to start over!
"q" or "Quit" <Enter>

Your newly partitioned USB stick is now recognized as sdX (usually sdb)
and your new partition on the stick is now recognized as sdX1 (usually sdb1)

C. Still at the joyous prompt, Format the newly partitioned USB drive!

fdisk /dev/sdX

mkfs -t vfat /dev/sdX1


7. Now, perform #3 and #4 of the SIMPLE METHOD, and you are done!
NOTE: stop here if a clean, formatted, recognizable USB stick is all you want .

___________________________

SOURCES:
http://manual.aptosid.com/en/part-cfdisk-en.htm
http://crunchbanglinux.org/wiki/statler_usb_installation
There comes a time in the affairs of man when he must take the bull by the tail and face the situation.
W. C. Fields

#7 who here is a guru?

who here is a guru?

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 11:39 AM

Linux on a Stick is super cool and I never heard of it 'til today. Thanks

I liked Ubuntu so much I then opted for a full install from the same Flash drive. I am now surfing the web faster than Windows ever dreamed of and I did not have to download all those updates from microsoft.

If you were close I'd hire you! I'm glad to see a lot of people here have tried it with success

#8 ejames82

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 05:44 PM

i have tried it with success about 50% of the time, and i have a sardu usb. there are dedicated files that are specially made for flash drives, and those are the ones most likely to work.
there is a program called 'unetbootin' that makes it real easy to put the image on the flash drive, however that doesn't mean that it will work.

edit:
sorry, i didn't notice that someone else already mentioned 'unetbootin'.

Edited by ejames82, 11 March 2011 - 05:46 PM.





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