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Ma Noo Kompooter - Epic FAIL X 10^10000


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Poll: Ever have you ever? (3 member(s) have cast votes)

Have you ever failed a piece of computer hardware while installing/uninstalling it?

  1. Yes, at least three times in the past hour. (1 votes [33.33%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 33.33%

  2. No, I am uber awesome and I never fayle. (2 votes [66.67%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 66.67%

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#1 troublesh00ter

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 01:18 PM

Those of you that were a part of the thread "My Noo Kompooter" will recall that I was trying to obtain components for a new gaming rig.

Well....

I finally got everything and put it all in and it wouldn't POST. So, I took everything out and put it all back in again. Maybe it was just a bad connection right?

WRONG!!!

Long story short, I managed to bend a small sector of pins in the LGA 1366 socket on my ASUS P6T motherboard. I spent some time trying to bend them back but the pins are very awkward. They come off the socket first at a 90 degree angle and then at a 35-45 degree angle and then back to a 90 degree angle where it stops short at a small point. The processor is pinless but has contacts that are supposed to match perfectly with the socket pins. I was unable to bend the pins back appropriately but I did not break any off. They are all present.

I am wondering if anyone knows a reputable motherboard repair tech with experience in LGA 1366 sockets. I am willing to ship this board for repair. Please note, the board cannot be RMA'd so do not suggest this. It will only annoy me :)

Thanks
for3ver,
goose90proof

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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 01:34 PM

Gotta ask, how did you bend up the contacts? I have literally done dozens of LGA builds/cpu replacements and never had any problems like that. Not rubbing it in, just really, really curious.

I would contact the motherboard's support site and get a price for a socket replacement. I haven't run across anyone(outside of the manufacturer) who swaps out/repairs CPU sockets.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#3 troublesh00ter

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 04:00 PM

I am not really sure how I bent the pins. I believe it happened when I was installing the heatsink. I didn't push the pins down in the correct fashion. I read the MB user manual the night before I put everything together just to be safe, but somehow I neglected to read up on the heatsink installation and that is where I believe the pins were bent.

I called ASUS but the guy said that he didn't have any info on the socket for some garbage reason about they were transferring their store to a new website. He said I could probably find it on ASUS eStore but when I found the board all it had available was the sata cables that came with the board, the back plate and a few other useless things like that.

I am actually skeptical that the socket can be replaced. I've been under the impression that LGA sockets are a part of the board itself and cannot be removed. You say you have experience with 1366 sockets? Can the socket be removed and replaced. I have a great solder and with a set of do-it-yourself instructions or a youtube video, I feel confident I could fix the board. :)

So... any suggestions?

P.S. - I've already ordered a replacement board but I'd like to fix this one so I can sell it. Right now it's a $240 decorative commemoration of my fail. :(
for3ver,
goose90proof

#4 ThunderZ

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 04:10 PM

The sockets are not a part of the board. BUT due to the way they are attached\soldered to the board they are very difficult to replace.

Posted Image
Each gold dot on the green board represents a place where the past would be. The socket as corresponding locations that must be perfectly matched.

All soldering points are under the socket. The solder is applied as a paste. The socket is precision placed on a specialized machine. Then the part is actually run through an oven to flow the solder and create a connection.

#5 troublesh00ter

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 04:59 PM

So how do I remove the socket?

Once I've removed the socket, you're saying that I apply solder paste (melted solder or solder paste?) directly on the contacts or on the entire area of the socket?

Once this solder paste has been applied, I need some kind of precision instrument (can I even get one of these?) to position the socket perfectly on the gold points? Then I bake the board..... in an oven....? Can I use my home oven, lol?

Hey I'm game to try anything cuz right now it's worthless. Just not very clear on the procedure.
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#6 ThunderZ

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 05:34 PM

So how do I remove the socket?


At least that area of the board will need to be heated to cause the paste to liquefy and release. Not sure of what temp is needed because I do`t know the specific type of paste used.

Once I've removed the socket, you're saying that I apply solder paste (melted solder or solder paste?) directly on the contacts or on the entire area of the socket?


IF you are able to remove the socket and leave all the gold contact pads on the board (which will now look silver because of the old solder) you will need and extremly thin layer of paste on the contact points only.

Once this solder paste has been applied, I need some kind of precision instrument (can I even get one of these?) to position the socket perfectly on the gold points? Then I bake the board..... in an oven....? Can I use my home oven, lol?


The placement can be done by hand but is extremely difficult. There may be a outline on the board. Also take note of the socket orientation. One corner of it should be marked on the board. It must match up with the same corner of the socket that it originally did.

The reheating is the tricky part. Companies that make boards for a living have ovens that are quit long and have a conveyor belt. They heat the board slowly as it passes through different heat zones. Then is allowed to slowly cool through the last couple zones. This prevents thermal shock to the component(s) and board warpage.

If the solder paste you use is leaded(contains lead as part of it`s composition) then for health reasons I would not use the family oven.

Hey I'm game to try anything cuz right now it's worthless. Just not very clear on the procedure.


Do`t blame you for trying it. Really have nothing to lose.

#7 Blaze413

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 06:27 PM

read on another forum website a while ago of someone who used their home oven for i dont think the socket for another peice of the motherboard and it worked for them...but like thunderz said id try and avoid the lead lol

#8 troublesh00ter

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 02:10 PM

Thanks a bunch for the suggestions. I feel like I'm much clearer on the process now. I'm gonna see if anyone at overclokers website knows what the best paste to use is and what the best method for heating would be with household resources.
for3ver,
goose90proof

#9 the_patriot11

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 06:15 PM

Well, if it makes you feel any better, heres my dumb Luck. I had an older intel LGA 775 socket motherboard in my linux box, which, like 1366 the pins are in the socket and the CPU is pinless, and the pins are bent about the same. Anyway, I had dismantled it (for various reasons I wont go into right now) and left the case laying on its side on the floor with the socket exposed and left town for a couple days. . .bad idea with a cat around, it stepped on the socket and broke 2 of the pins and bent a third. I was able to un bend the bent one, but there was no fixing the broken ones, and apparently, they were needed. Turned the board into a nice 35 dollar brick (I bought it off ebay for 35 bucks) Anyway, ya, your not the only one whos bricked motherboards doing that. . .

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#10 troublesh00ter

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 09:18 AM

OH NO! That's terrible. That'll learn ya not to leave your parts exposed like that. ;)

Silly kitty... lol
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#11 ThunderZ

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 09:59 AM

Do I ever understand about cats...... Have lost a couple keyboards to their furballs. :censored:

These were not cheap keyboards either. :ranting:

We have also learned our lesson about leaving the PC`s on when we are away. For some reason they love to lay on a keyboard. Do you have any idea what hitting multiple keyboard short cuts at once and for a prooooloooooonged period of time does to an OS? :rip:
Cost me a whole day for a reinstall on my main tower. :blink:

#12 killerx525

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 10:25 AM

Keep your computer in a room and close the door when your not in there so the cat can't come in and wreck it.


Edit:
Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~ tg

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#13 ThunderZ

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 11:11 AM

In a perfect world that would work.

But seeing as how the wife <_< saw fit to put the cat box, food and water in the same room, closing the door is not an option. :huh:


Edit:
Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~ tg

#14 killerx525

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 06:56 PM

Maybe if you have a large laundry room the cat can stay there :woot:


Edit:
Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~ tg

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png





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