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Upgraded Video Card, CPU won't POST or Boot


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#1 Yoshistr

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:41 PM

I have a DELL GX280 desktop and decided to upgrade the video card on it, I put in a ASUS EAH3450 (512MB) graphics card in the AGP slot (black color) on the motherboard, when I did this and had my computer on it asked to install the drivers for it, I put the CD in and it installed 2 of the 3 drivers (missing audio driver on the CD that came with the card). Everything seemed fine, the video was displaying through the new graphics card while the old graphics card was still installed (original card is integrated into the mother board but I never disabled it).

After trying it out and finding that I like it I decided to reboot the machine, however on reboot it started having problems, the fans went on and the power button turned a steady yellow (instead of green) and I waited but no graphics appeared and the fan on the mobo continued to get louder until it maxed out. After checking the LED lights on the back I noticed none of them turned on when I turn the machine on, indicating the cpu failed to post, checking the mobo I made sure all the capacitors where not blown or leaking however noticed a steady yellow LED on the mobo next to the label "AUX PWR" indicating a lack of power for the new graphics card.

Now I just want to use the old card but I can't even get the machine to post with the new card removed, I tried to reset the BIOS settings by removing the CMOS battery, I tried to switch out the RAM, removing sticks to check if it was the memory that was bad but now I am confused on what to do at this point.

Any advice would be appreciated to get the machine back up and running, basically I want to use the old graphics card but the drivers for the new one are installed however I don't think the BIOS knows which one to load.

I am not that good with computer hardware so please explain.

My specs:
2x 2GB RAM = 4GB RAM
2.8GHz Intel 4 Pentium
128MB 910GL Graphics Card (Original)
512MB ASUS EAH3450 Graphics Card (New - AGP Slot)
210W PSU


IMG_0154 shows the new graphics card (Red)
IMG_0163 shows my psu at the top and at the bottom there seems to be a PCI slot expansion case,
im not too sure though what it is...
IMG_0164 shows the AUX PWR light that goes on as soon as I plug the PC in, even when I don't press the power button it remains on.

Attached File  IMG_0154.jpg   56.92KB   4 downloads
Attached File  IMG_0163.jpg   27.79KB   4 downloads
Attached File  IMG_0164.jpg   45.92KB   3 downloads

Edited by Yoshistr, 03 January 2011 - 10:57 PM.

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#2 dc3

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 02:19 AM

The steady amber light can be an indication that there is a problem with the PSU.

Try the following to test the PSU.

The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

When a computer begins the boot process the motherboard initiates the start up of the PSU. Because of this it is difficult to determine whether the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU when a computer shows no signs of starting up. The purpose of the procedure is to determine if the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

This test is for ATX PSUs. Some manufacturers use non-ATX PSUs with 20/24 pin connectors that don‚„t have the same pinout as a ATX PSU.

This test is for ATX PSUs. Some manufacturers use non-ATX PSUs with 20/24 pin connectors that don't have the same pinout as a ATX PSU.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

At this point you can use a DC Voltage meter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent plus or minus of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 Yoshistr

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 01:42 PM

Hello,

Thank you for the response, I will give it a try however I have to locate my multimeter.

I believe the motherboard is intact and the issue is the PSU did not supply
enough power for the new graphics card causing it to short and I will need to upgrade the PSU.
The PSU for Dell GX280 is the 20 pin adapter that goes to the motherboard and also an additional 4-pin separate connection to the motherboard. I am not sure if the PSU I want to purchase (400W Max Output) will be enough power to support both the ASUS EAH3450 card and the internal 910GL graphics card.

The previous psu has a max output of 210W and was working fine with the internal card, the only addition was
the ASUS card with the same PSU, do you guys think a 400W psu will fix the issue of the cpu not posting or booting?

If anyone has advice on this I would appreciate any help.
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#4 dc3

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:36 PM

The dedicated and integrated graphics don't both run at the same time, it will be either one or the other. So your PSU will not be supporting both.

It looks like you will need at least a 300W PSU for that graphics card.

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#5 Yoshistr

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 12:21 PM

I ordered a 400W PSU which should support my intel mobo, hopefully everything works.
Could I have short circuited components or the mobo when I ran the new graphics card with
the factory 210W PSU?

What confuses me is while Windows was running and I had the new graphics card installed
and installed all the drivers everything was working fine but the problem started after I
rebooted. So the psu was providing enough power for the new graphics card but could it be something
wrong in the BIOS or the audio driver which was missing from the asus cdrom?
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#6 dc3

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 12:31 PM

I suspect that if this PSU was underpowered it was your problem. This wouldn't be a problem with the BIOS. The CD-ROM is a "plug and play device", this means that when you install the drive the installation Wizard will recognize the new hardware upon the nest start and assign drivers which are native to the operating system. If you have a problem with the CD-ROM, look in the Device manager to see if there is a problem with it. Usually if it is a driver issue you can simply uninstall the driver, restart your computer, and the installation Wizard will reinstall the drivers.

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#7 Yoshistr

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 01:19 PM

What I meant to say was that the new graphics card was actually being used to drive the display adapter rather than the onboard card. I noticed this in device manager and also was able to use higher resolution displays than before.
Everything was working fine then I had to restart so I think it may be the bios settings trying to load the wrong card...
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#8 dc3

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 01:42 PM

Usually if you have both an integrated and dedicated graphics the BIOS will either automatically switch to the dedicated card, or you have to manually choose the dedicated. Have you checked in the BIOS so see what the options are?

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#9 Yoshistr

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 05:48 PM

I don't think I can get into the BIOS because I don't have any display to see...I don't remember the keys I need to press and can't think of how to solve this yet.
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#10 dc3

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:23 PM

Try the Delete key.

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#11 Yoshistr

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 11:51 AM

Problem is I don't have a graphics card outputting to the monitor so I still won't be able to see
anything and the system is not issuing any beeps so it seems to be a hardware issue.
The cpu won't even begin post because the back leds won't light up, awaiting the new psu and will keep
you updated after I install it.
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