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Best Internet Suite?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 dm1499

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 09:20 PM

Forgive me if this has been covered (and probably has more than once) but is there a good all-in-one A/V, anti-Malware, anti-Spyware and Firewall suite out there?

Many of the programs listed in these forums are individually good programs depending on what its protecting against, but it would be nice to have one that does everything!

I'm currently considering Avast, which supposedly has very good malware protection. I like Kaspersky, but it causes some Firefox browser issues.

Any other recommendations?

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 09:03 AM

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites generally use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task. They tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses for each feature. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality and more effective at what they are designed to do. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring default settings and usage.

Choosing a security toolkit with anti-virus, firewall and anti-malware programs is a matter of personal preference, your needs, your technical ability and experience, features offered, user friendliness, ease of updating (and upgrading to new program release), ease of installation/removal, available technical support from the vendor and price. Other factors to consider include detection rates and methods, scanning engine effectiveness, how often virus definitions are updated, the amount of resources the program utilizes, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular anti-virus that works well for one person may not work as well for another. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your use and your system. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone and there is no best anti-virus. For more specific information to consider, please read Choosing Your Anti-virus Software.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense, safe computing and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.


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#3 dm1499

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 11:00 AM

I've always thought multi-layer protection was best, but have been told not to do that.

So, here's what I have now:

Avast! Internet Security (paid)
Comodo A/V & Firewall (free)
Windows XP A/V & Firewall
Spybot S&D (Set to scan daily)
Malwarebytes (I'm thinking of purchasing for the scan scheduler)

Too much? Should I drop the multi-layer A/V - Firewall and just allow Spybot and Malwarebytes to supplement Avast?

#4 Rohit.K

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 11:46 AM

Nothing is fool-proof in this insecure world. If you are thinking of an anti-Virus product that you just install and forget then you are mistaken. Selecting an anti-virus product also depends on your usage on your PC and the system configuration.

Though quietman7 has already suggested you the link, you can also read my article here on what to see while selecting an anti-virus.

Edited by Rohit.K, 01 January 2011 - 11:53 AM.


#5 quietman7

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 01:16 PM

Using more than one software firewall on a single computer is not advisable. Why? Using two firewalls could cause issues with connectivity to the Internet or other unexpected behavior. Further, running multiple software firewalls can cause conflicts that are hard to identify and troubleshoot. Only one of the firewalls can receive the packets over the network and process them. Sometimes you may even have a conflict that causes neither firewall to protect your connection. However, you can use a hardware firewall (a router) and a software firewall (i.e. Kerio, ZoneAlarm, Comodo, etc) in conjunction.
You also may want to read Understanding and Using Firewalls.

FYI: mvps.org is no longer recommending Spybot S&D or Ad-Aware due to poor testing results. See here - (scroll down and read under Freeware Antispyware Products).

Ad-Aware has even been placed into the Installers Hall of Shame for bundling and pre-checking Google Chrome during the installation. Also read Lavasoft Turning to the Dark Side? writtne by a former volunteer (now a MVP) who provided support for Ad-Aware but no longer uses the program.

As for Spybot S&D, most people don't understand how to use TeaTimer and that feature can cause more problems than it's worth. TeaTimer monitors changes to certain critical keys in Windows registry but does not indicate if the change is normal or a modification made by a malware infection. The user must have an understanding of the registry and how TeaTimer works in order to make informed decisions to allow or deny the detected changes. If you don't have understanding how a particular security tool works, then you probably should not be using it. Additionally, TeaTimer may conflict with other security tools which do a much better job of protecting your computer and in some cases it will even prevent disinfection of malware by those tools.

More effective alternatives are Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and SUPERAntiSpyware Free.
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#6 doctorphibes

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 04:52 AM

On my personal computers I use AV according to the amount of resources I have available. This particular one I use a suite (call me lazy). and I use Malwarebytes Pro version along with it. On some of my older ones I use Malwarebytes Pro and Zone Alarm Firewall Free and suffer no more adverse affects than with more. I'm not sure if using MBAM with a real time AV scanner is wise or not but 25 bucks for a lifetime license is a steal in my opinion (MBAM). I also use some sort of program (I'm kind of testing right now), to avoid USB autoruns, since they have become more widespread. Last but not least of all I run sandboxed, and try to be careful on the net. Beyond that I don't know what more I can do. Oh yes. I also run the latest version of Kaspersky's Live CD every couple of months (very handy). Sorry but I try to stay away from all things Norton and Panda(at least the Cloud AV). They are too difficult to get rid of. I feel like I'm being held hostage. I'm of the opinion that if it weren't for Norton's 6 month free trial with Windows they would have died long ago, and that free trial(complete with fake alerts), have ruined a lot of computers over time because uninformed people (like myself), thought they were protected. Every time a friend asks me to get rid of Norton because they don't know how I have to use Norton uninstaller(the best thing they put out), and something like Revo Uninstaller to rid them of the vast amount of leftovers. I think it was Kaspersky's Rescue CD that actually named one of it's catches Norton Fake Virus Alert. Whichever it was that was all further convincing I needed.
As previously stated, there is no universal panacea for computer protection. The closest you can probably come is a Linux flavor and then use
Puppy on top of that! :crazy:

Edited by doctorphibes, 03 January 2011 - 04:54 AM.

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