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pc security


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#1 shadowrelm

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 05:46 AM

I was wondering what the best combination of software to use to get the best pc security. the best anti virus, anti spam, and so on that work well together and can handle anything to hit the machine.

Edited by hamluis, 25 December 2010 - 11:13 AM.
Moved from XP to AV, Firewall, Privacy Protection ~ Hamluis.


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#2 Andrew

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 07:24 AM

I use a pair of applications: Avast! Antivirus and MalwareBytes Anti-Malware. Both come in free and paid versions. The free versions of both apps offer superior protection, though the paid versions add some extra features. Spam protection is generally handled better by your e-mail provider, though the paid version of Avast offers spam protection as well.

Despite the superior quality of these two products, it bears mentioning that there is no such thing as 100% bulletproof protection. Ultimately, your system's security relies on you and you alone to make wise decisions when using it. Use common sense when using the internet, regard files arriving as e-mail attachments with suspicion unless you were expecting them (and even then!) make backups of your important data, keep your protection software updated and active and install security updates for your operating system and applications. These five things can offer more protection than any security scanner ever can if diligently applied.

Edited by Andrew, 25 December 2010 - 07:26 AM.


#3 chromebuster

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 06:12 PM

Good going there, dude. I disagree about the email provider handling spam is the best thing though. Two things. One, if possible, allow Microsoft Outlook to handle that, and if you're good enough, and your ISP doesn't block ports, set up your own email server, and you'll think it's the best thing since sliced bread. I have issues with other unknown entities controlling any aspect of my technical life, and that's why I refuse to use any of Verizon's extra services, relying on my college for my primary email and Google for my secondary account, and I like that. I mean, Gordon does have a tendency to control certain things, like, they use safe connect to control what applications are allowed on folks computers, but that's only due to the fact that they for one, refuse to upgrade their servers to windows server 2008, and for two, they don't have the network staff who know the meaning of the term Active Directory. Therefore, us students get screwed and spied upon.

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#4 Andrew

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 12:38 AM

Good going there, dude. I disagree about the email provider handling spam is the best thing though.

I guess it depends on ones tech savvy and how much you trust the e-mail provider. My Yahoo and Gmail accounts don't mean a whole lot to me so I'm fine with letting Google and Yahoo manage the backend for them. My "official" e-mail accounts, however, are a different story. And while I think very highly of the server admins and network staff of the company I contract with (Medialayer, in case you're interested. I highly, highly recommend them) I am glad that they provide me an interface for tweaking SpamAssasin and other settings.




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