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Getting Linux Ubuntu


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9 replies to this topic

#1 scorpia13

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 03:26 AM

I have a Windows Vista and I'm thinking of maybe switching to Ubuntu. I've been researching and looking at how it's better/worse. My decision is set in concrete, so I've definetely decided to get Ubuntu. But I'm not sure if it's best to get a new laptop with Linux on it or buy the OS. I really don't want to download it as my speed isn't great and I'm not that keen on downloading from an unknown source for obvious reasons. I want to get rid of Vista completely.
I want to keep my laptop and not buy a new one, but if I'm going to buy the OS, I would have to install it on top of Windows and then remove Windows. As a newbie, I don't want to completely ruin my computer by doing those sorts of things. Any suggestions or instructions on what's best to do.
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#2 KamakaZ

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 06:38 PM

I'm sorry to tell you but Linux is free. There are two ways to get Ubuntu, either download it from "unknown sources" such as this or request Ubuntu on a CD. They do change a fee for mailing a disc.

Depending on your ISP you may be able to download it for free and not count against your downloads. I know in Australia (here) if you are signed up with bigpond.com they offer a downloads section which is unmetered, in this they offer various different Linux editions as well as other open source software.

Why would you have to install it over the top of Windows and then uninstall Windows? If it's because of data, why not buy a memory stick or an external hard drive copy data onto that and then back onto Ubuntu (note you may need to install programs to read the NTFS files, not sure as I don't use Ubuntu)?

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#3 PolaBar

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 07:18 PM

Some other options:

If your hard drive is large enough, partition it and set up Ubuntu as a dual boot. Then you can switch back and forth and test out the Ubuntu to see if you prefer it before you wipe out windows.

If your hard drive is not large enough for both OS's, purchase a new hard drive and install the Ubuntu on it. Then you can leave windows on the old one and have it in reserve.

#4 BlackSpyder

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 08:03 PM

If you do not have sufficient download speeds to either torrent it (Cononical, Ubuntu's parent company, provides a torrent link for Ubuntu) or download it from Ubuntu you can order a CD pack from Cononical and pay shipping, or if you don't have the patiance for that Best Buy was selling copies of Ubuntu for $10 last time I was there.

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download the torrent can be found under the "alternative downloads" link on that page.

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#5 buddy215

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 08:15 PM

Users new to Ubuntu and have never used a Linux distro on their computer, should
first run the live CD to see what if any problems may exist with the hardware and to
experience Ubuntu first without installing it.
You should also be aware that many Window programs are not designed to use in Linux.
Check the programs you now use to be sure there is either a similar Linux one or
a substitute. Such as Office.

While several printers work good on Ubuntu, there are several that do not. Check to
see if your printer manufacturer has drivers designed for use in Ubuntu.

Dual booting is really the best way to go if and when you decide to install Ubuntu.
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
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#6 Trio3b

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 11:25 AM

Glad to see you make the plunge, however pay attention to whether you are running towards Linux or away from Windows. There is a learning curve, not b/c it's Linux but because it's different, just as Windows was different from what you knew when first starting out.

1. Absolutely run a LiveCD first. This will tell you if the distro you've chosen likes your hdwr. It WILL run slower b/c it has to be decompressed on the fly bit will run faster once installed.

2. I have to disagree with the dual boot suggestion for this reason. If you are a noob, you can render a nice new computer useless for several weeks while you learn the ropes. Better to get a Plll junker from the local thrift shop ($30 or less) and tinker with that .....or you can buy refurb hard drives on line. Plug it in and tinker there. Dual boots are not brutally hard but you can mess up the MBR or erase your "paid for" windows partition if you are new or not paying attention. I have multibooted ovder the years and it's fun and not too terribly hard but don't recommend for the new user on a new $500 PC.

3. Aside from the fact that you have a slow 'net connection, understand that as a general rule the people who provide Linux do so with a reputation to uphold. They are not likely to allow any nasty stuff on their servers to taint your download. All the software for most distros is held in repositories maintained usually by the distros themselves and even if mirrored, are watched like a mother hen and word would spread quickly if a mirrored site was contaminated. Take on the other hand Microsoft who would deny, deny that any problem existed and make you the consumer wait until they verified and "" fixed"" a problem . Meanwhile your Windows isnstallation has been infected. Also, MS CANNOT watch over the thousands of third party downloads that exist on the 'net.

It's counter intuitive but that's one reason why Linux tends to be more secure.

4. Please, please understand that Linux is NOT Ubuntu. Ubuntu and its variations (known as *buntu) are merely versions. Having installed many distros over much hardware over the past 5 years I can tell you that Mandriva and PCLinuxOS have the best combination of installer, partitioner,hardware detection, just the right blend of up to date software packages (not too old not too bleeding edge), experienced user forums and maturity to provide a stable OS. Also, Mandy and PCLOS have the best GUI administration center in the business. You can do almost anything there. My last recollections are that Ubuntu was more inconsistent in terms of hdwr detection/install and the administration tasks were spread out all over the menus. If this has changed then I stand corrected but it was so just a couple releases ago.

hope this helps

#7 cryptodan

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 05:02 AM

I would recommend that you download Wubi Installer from Wubi Installer

Wubi is an officially supported Ubuntu installer for Windows users that can bring you to the Linux world with a single click. Wubi allows you to install and uninstall Ubuntu as any other Windows application, in a simple and safe way. Are you curious about Linux and Ubuntu? Trying them out has never been easier!


If you dont like it, then just remove it using Programs and Features.

#8 myrti

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 10:18 AM

Hi,

you can easily reinstall grub from a CD: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RecoveringUbuntuAfterInstallingWindows

Or if you want to recover the windows boot manager, just use fixmbr in the recovery console.

regards myrti

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#9 MrClose

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 04:18 AM

I would recommend that you download Wubi Installer from Wubi Installer


Wubi is an officially supported Ubuntu installer for Windows users that can bring you to the Linux world with a single click. Wubi allows you to install and uninstall Ubuntu as any other Windows application, in a simple and safe way. Are you curious about Linux and Ubuntu? Trying them out has never been easier!


If you dont like it, then just remove it using Programs and Features.

WOW!!!

Thank You!!

I have been wanting to try ubuntu for months now but being an idiot (as far as pc's go 8-) I've been scared as hell that I'd mess something up.

wubi looks like just what I need.

Again .. Thank You!

#10 yorkiepup

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 07:48 PM


I would recommend that you download Wubi Installer from Wubi Installer


Wubi is an officially supported Ubuntu installer for Windows users that can bring you to the Linux world with a single click. Wubi allows you to install and uninstall Ubuntu as any other Windows application, in a simple and safe way. Are you curious about Linux and Ubuntu? Trying them out has never been easier!


If you dont like it, then just remove it using Programs and Features.

WOW!!!

Thank You!!

I have been wanting to try ubuntu for months now but being an idiot (as far as pc's go 8-) I've been scared as hell that I'd mess something up.

wubi looks like just what I need.

Again .. Thank You!


I'm kind of new to Linux myself, but I can tell you from experience that using Wubi can be problematic. It nearly steered me away from Ubuntu altogether, until I figured out exactly what had happened. You might run into problems with Wubi if you install updates through Synaptic package manager. Running Wubi is not the same as having a distro installed in the conventional way. Wubi was kind of a waste of time, but I'm not sure if I would have tried Ubuntu without it. Dual booting isn't really that difficult. Sure, I wiped out the MBR and couldn't boot Windows. But who needs Windows anyway? And I fixed the MBR as another poster mentioned. I've booted into Windows a half a dozen times in the past year. It's useful from time to time, unfortunately. Usually when something proprietary is involved. Good luck, and I hope you like Ubuntu!




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