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need useful advice on how to remove this sdra64 guy


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#1 bakayurei

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 04:27 PM

i did a search around on this site for information about this and could only find closed discussion threads with no helpful information so i'm starting a new one .. and the only information i could find anywhere on the web was useless to me as the method described elsewhere would only have worked if i was using windows xp, which i'm not .. right, so.. can anybody give me any advice? can't see the registry in regedit, but i know where the trojan's hiding, and it's in C:\Users\Me\AppData\Roaming .. and it's there, but it won't let me delete it directly.. spybot search and destroy can't seem to find it but it did its best so i'm not mad at it.. um.. and i asked windows defender's software explorer to remove the program but it keeps popping right back up, that hasn't seemed to have helped .. what do the experts here recommend?

Edit: Moved topic from Vista to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal

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#2 bakayurei

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 08:20 PM

thanks for moving the thread but what i really need is information on how to kill this malware please

#3 bakayurei

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 10:22 AM

come on, one of you people must know something .. sorry to sound pushy but.. actually scratch that, i'm not sorry for needing help and asking for it, my files and data are at risk

#4 quietman7

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 03:13 PM

The problem with sdra64.exe is that it is often seen with other malicious files and infections to include Virut, a dangerous polymorphic file infector.

So depending on the severity of your infection we may need to refer you to another forum in order to use more powerful tools if unsuccessful here.

Please download Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (v1.50) and save it to your desktop.
Download Link 1
Download Link 2MBAM may "make changes to your registry" as part of its disinfection routine. If using other security programs that detect registry changes (ie Spybot's Teatimer), they may interfere or alert you. Temporarily disable such programs or permit them to allow the changes.

  • Make sure you are connected to the Internet.
  • Double-click on mbam-setup.exe to install the application.
    For instructions with screenshots, please refer to the How to use Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware Guide.
  • When the installation begins, follow the prompts and do not make any changes to default settings.
  • When installation has finished, make sure you leave both of these checked:
    • Update Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
    • Launch Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
  • Then click Finish.
MBAM will automatically start and you will be asked to update the program before performing a scan.
  • If an update is found, the program will automatically update itself. Press the OK button to close that box and continue.
  • If you encounter any problems while downloading the definition updates, manually download them from here and just double-click on mbam-rules.exe to install.
On the Scanner tab:
  • Make sure the "Perform Quick Scan" option is selected.
  • Then click on the Scan button.
  • If asked to select the drives to scan, leave all the drives selected and click on the Start Scan button.
  • The scan will begin and "Scan in progress" will show at the top. It may take some time to complete so please be patient.
  • When the scan is finished, a message box will say "The scan completed successfully. Click 'Show Results' to display all objects found".
  • Click OK to close the message box and continue with the removal process.
Back at the main Scanner screen:
  • Click on the Show Results button to see a list of any malware that was found.
  • Make sure that everything is checked, and click Remove Selected.
  • When removal is completed, a log report will open in Notepad.
  • The log is automatically saved and can be viewed by clicking the Logs tab in MBAM.
  • Copy and paste the contents of that report in your next reply. Be sure to post the complete log to include the top portion which shows MBAM's database version and your operating system.
  • Exit MBAM when done.
Note: If MBAM encounters a file that is difficult to remove, you will be asked to reboot your computer so it can proceed with the disinfection process. If asked to restart the computer, please do so immediately. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware.

-- Some types of malware will target Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and other security tools to keep them from running properly. If that's the case, please refer to the suggestions provided in For those having trouble running Malwarebytes Anti-Malware as you may need to rename it or use RKill by Grinler.


Please perform a scan with Kaspersky Online Virus Scanner.
-- Requires free Java Runtime Environment (JRE) to be installed before scanning for malware as ActiveX is no longer being used.
-- This scan will not remove any detected file threats but it will show where they are located so they can be cleaned with other tools.
  • Vista/Windows 7 users need to run Internet Explorer as Administrator.
    To do this, right-click on the IE icon in the Start Menu or Quick Launch Bar on the Taskbar and select Run As Administrator from the context menu.
  • Read the "Advantages - Requirements and Limitations" then press the Posted Image... button.
  • You will be prompted to install an application from Kaspersky. Click the Run button. It will start downloading and installing the scanner and virus definitions.
  • When the downloads have finished, you should see 'Database is updated. Ready to scan'. Click on the Posted Image... button.
  • Make sure these boxes are checked. By default, they should be. If not, please check them and click on the Posted Image... button afterwards:
    • Detect malicious programs of the following categories:
      Viruses, Worms, Trojan Horses, Rootkits
      Spyware, Adware, Dialers and other potentially dangerous programs
    • Scan compound files (doesn't apply to the File scan area):
      Archives
      Mail databases
  • Click on My Computer under the Scan section. OK any warnings from your protection programs.
  • The scan will take a while so be patient and do NOT use the computer while the scan is running. Keep all other programs and windows closed.
  • Once the scan is complete (the 'status' will show complete), click on View Scan Report and any infected objects will be shown.
  • Click on Save Report As... and change the Files of type to Text file (.txt)
  • Name the file KAVScan_ddmmyy (day, month, year) before clicking on the Save button and save it to your Desktop.
  • Copy and paste (Ctrl+C) the saved scan results from that file in your next reply.
-- Note: Some online scanners will detect existing anti-virus software and refuse to cooperate. You may have to disable the real-time protection components of your existing anti-virus and try running the scan again. If you do this, remember to turn them back on after you are finished. If that's the case, please refer to How To Temporarily Disable Your Anti-virus.

Edited by quietman7, 01 December 2010 - 03:16 PM.

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#5 bakayurei

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 09:47 PM

hi, thanks very much for that, i managed to destroy it in the end but i appreciate your help and i'll see if i can apply your advice to similar problems in future.. tho fingers crossed i won't have to

#6 quietman7

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 10:13 PM

You're welcome.

:thumbup2: Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:

Keep Windows and Internet Explorer current with all security updates from Microsoft which will patch many of the security holes through which attackers can gain access to your computer. When necessary, Microsoft releases security updates on the second Tuesday of each month and publishes Security update bulletins to announce and describe the update. If you're not sure how to install updates, please refer to Updating your computer. Microsoft also recommends Internet 6 and 7 users to upgrade their browsers due to security vulnerabilities which can be exploited by hackers.

Avoid gaming sites, porn sites, pirated software (warez), cracking tools, and keygens. They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. In some instances an infection may cause so much damage to your system that recovery is not possible and the only option is to wipe your drive, reformat and reinstall the OS.

Avoid peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs (i.e. Limewire, eMule, Kontiki, BitTorrent, BitComet, uTorrent, BitLord, BearShare). They too are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to malware infections. File sharing networks are thoroughly infected and infested with malware according to Senior Virus Analyst, Norman ASA. Malicious worms, backdoor Trojans IRCBots, and rootkits spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming, porn and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans, and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications.
Beware of Rogue Security software as they are one of the most common sources of malware infection. They infect machines by using social engineering and scams to trick a user into spending money to buy a an application which claims to remove malware. For more specific information on how these types of rogue programs install themselves and spread infections, read How Malware Spreads - How did I get infected.

Keeping Autorun enabled on flash drives has become a significant security risk as they are one of the most common infection vectors for malware which can transfer the infection to your computer. One in every eight malware attacks occurs via a USB device. Many security experts recommend you disable Autorun as a method of prevention. Microsoft recommends doing the same.Note: If using Windows 7, be aware that in order to help prevent malware from spreading, the Windows 7 engineering team made important changes and improvements to AutoPlay so that it will no longer support the AutoRun functionality for non-optical removable media.

Always update vulnerable software like browsers, Adobe Reader and Java Runtime Environment (JRE) with the latest security patches. Older versions of these programs have vulnerabilities that malicious sites can use to exploit and infect your system.
Use strong passwords and change them anytime you encounter a malware infection, especially if the computer was used for online banking, paying bills, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it. This would include any used for taxes, email, eBay, paypal and other online activities. You should consider them to be compromised and change all passwords immediately as a precaution in case an attacker was able to steal your information when the computer was infected. If using a router, you need to reset it with a strong logon/password so the malware cannot gain control before connecting again.

• Finally, use common sense, safe computing and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.
Security Resources from Microsoft:Other Security Resources:Browser Security Resources:
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