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I Need Help Cleaning up the Mess AVG 2011 did to my computer


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#1 CahosRahneVeloza

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 02:43 PM

Hi everyone :)

This is my first post on this here fine community.

I hope you guys forgive me if I posted this in the wrong section as I'm not sure where my "problem" is best discussed at.

I decided to post this here after using the search function to look for "AVG 2011 related" threads & finding a few of 'em on here.

Now about the problem at hand...

I've been a "believer" of AVG for three years now & swear by the AV's performance (in the past), but this recent version totally made me lose confidence in them.

I've been using AVG 9 for some time now & though it sometimes has issues with nProtect GameGuard (I play an MMORPG that uses it) there are work arounds like adding the MMO's folder to AVG's list of exempted files/folders that it scans.

I updated to version 10 (2011) last Saturday when a pop up from AVG told me about it. Naturally as one of their "loyal" users I decided to update, yeah I know I was a gullible idiot :inlove:

So the update finished & I had to reboot which I'm quite accustomed by now.

Then after reboot, I decided to fiddle with the AV's new features (God did I look stupid being tricked by eye candy lol). One of the things I noticed was the "Rootkit" Scanner bit, something AVG used to offer free as a separate download, but they then made only available to paid customers in version 9.

But the one feature that caught my eye was that damn "PC Analyzer" crap. The way its description told me about it & how I understood it was that it was kinda like CCleaner (but as I later found messed my system up instead of making it run better), but in order for it to "clean" my system I had to download another tool, the dreaded "PC Tune up!" utility.

Again, being a "loyal" follower of AVG I blindly used it... How would I have known the thing messes up my computer? It's AVG & based on their years of excellence I was guided by blind faith to use it.

And the end result was that my system got haywired :(

My computer began to repeatedly reboot as if my RAM or power supply is going out, which was why I went to my PC technician to have my rig examined if the cause was indeed my RAM or Power Supply & thankfully they were not the culprit. Oh but wait... Before I did that, I went & uninstalled 2011 & PC tune up! (I only started reading up on the deal with 2011 a few hours ago, so I did not know of that app's "rescue" whatever it is function) & then I tried doing a system restore using a restore point prior to AVG 2011 & PC Tune up!'s installation to try & fix what registry value's that damn thing messed up. According to what I've read so far, that does work except...

I'm still getting a few random reboots, one three hours after my restore process I did yesterday & one 10 minutes into me turning my computer on & using it a few hours ago. No more random reboots happened as of now, but I'm still a bit wary. Could my restore process have not fully fixed the mess that crapware did to my computer's registry?

And that's why I have decided to join this fine community of yours & posted this topic on here, to ask for some help.

I'm a Windows XP SP3 Home Edition user by the way.

Edited by CahosRahneVeloza, 28 November 2010 - 02:45 PM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 04:18 PM

The AVG PC Analyzer component serves to scan your PC for the errors that affect its performance. Below you can find what errors are being searched for by the component:

  • Registry errors - errors in sytem registry that can affect system stability
  • Junk Files - unneeded files that take up disk space
  • Fragmentation - fragmented data that reduce disk access speed
  • Broken Shortcuts - non-functional shortcuts that reduce explorer browsing speed
Please note that the AVG PC Analyzer can find the errors but it does not fix them. To fix the detected issues, there is a standalone AVG Program - AVG PC TuneUp which is available free for 24-hour trial. For more information about AVG PC TuneUp please visit AVG PC TuneUp FAQ section or try AVG PC TuneUp yourself by downloading the trial version.

AVG FAQ 3908: AVG PC Analyzer - what is it

AVG PC Tuneup is a computer maintenance and optimization tool that you can install together with AVG.

This standalone application analyzes and fixes different issues that might occur on your computer, speeding up the system and making it more secure.

Running the System Scan will check for and repair errors in the following areas:

  • Registry Errors - fixing these errors makes the system more stable
  • Junk Files - cleans up old files to free disk space
  • Disk Errors - repairing these errors prevents the loss of data
  • Disk Fragmentation - defragmenting speeds up your hard drive
System Advisor helps you secure your PC - it will give you advice on application and system settings.

Resource Usage shows how your computer is being used. You can view details for each of the categories.

Under Advanced Tools, various tweak tools are available to quickly optimize the corresponding areas.

AVG FAQ 3811: What is AVG PC Tuneup?
AVG PC Tuneup FAQs

From the description provided by AVG, these features include registry cleaning and optimization tools. Most registry cleaners allow you to make a back up of the registry prior to cleaning, and restore to the state it was before you used it. Some will even create logs so you can view the actual registry changes and optimization tweaks performed. Since you removed AVG 2011 and PC Tuneup, the folder storing these backups and logs has probably been deleted. If that's the case, there is no way to know exactly what changes were made or to restore the system to its state before you applied those changes. If the folder was still present with the backups, you could redownload AVG PC Tuneup and trying doing a restore.

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

:step1: Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

:step2: Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

:step3: Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

:step4: Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

:step5: The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.


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#3 CahosRahneVeloza

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 05:02 AM

Thanks for the reply quietman7 :)

So it seems I did screw myself over twice, first by running the damn thing & second removing it without checking back on it's rollbacl logs?

Geez, how careless I was :(

#4 quietman7

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 07:46 AM

Not a problem.

About the only thing you can do with random reboots is attempt to trace the cause and then look for a possible solution.

When Windows detects a problem from which it cannot recover, it displays Stop Error Messages which contain specific information that can help diagnose and resolve the problem detected by the Windows kernel. An error message can be related to a broad number of problems such as driver conflicts, hardware issues, read/write errors, and software malfunctions and malware. In Windows XP, the default setting is for the computer to reboot automatically when a fatal error or crash occurs. You may not see the error code because the computer reboots too fast.

An easier alternative is to turn off the automatic reboot feature so you can actually see the error code/STOP Message when it happens - this is also known as the Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD). To change the recovery settings and Disable the Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows XP, go to Start > Run and type: sysdm.cpl
Click Ok to open System Properties.

Alternatively you can just press WINKEY + Pause/Break keys to bring up System Properties.
  • Go to the Advanced tab and under "Startup and Recovery", click on the "Settings" button and go to "System failure".
  • Make sure "Write an event to the system log" is checked and that "Automatically restart" is unchecked.
  • Click "OK" and reboot manually for the changes to take effect.
This can also be done in the Windows Advanced Options Menu as shown here by pressing the F8 key repeatedly like you would do for entering safe mode.

-- Vista users can refer to these instructions: How To Disable the Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows Vista.
-- Windows 7 users can refer to these instructions: How To Disable the Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows 7.

Doing this won't cure your problem but instead of crashing and restarting you will get a blue diagnostic screen with an error code and other information to include file(s) that may be involved which will allow you to better trace your problem. Write down the full error code and the names of any files/drivers listed so you can conduct a Google search for further information. Without doing that, you would only be guessing rather than troubleshooting.
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#5 CahosRahneVeloza

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 03:57 PM

To quietman7:

Thank you for the informative links :)

After my last post I noticed that the random reboots/restarts or crashes no longer occur. Could my system have fully recovered on its own? But even if it did, I finally decided to just reformat three days ago & everything's cool now. Thanks for all your help & I will definitely steer clear of AVG 2011 for now.

Edited by CahosRahneVeloza, 05 December 2010 - 03:57 PM.


#6 quietman7

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 06:11 PM

Crashes (BSOD), unexpected shutdowns, sudden freezing, random restarting, and booting problems could be symptomatic of a variety of things to include hardware/software issues, overheating caused by a failed processor fan, bad memory (RAM), failing or underpowered power supply, CPU overheating, motherboard, video card, faulty or unsigned device drivers, CMOS battery going bad, BIOS and firmware problems, dirty hardware components, programs hanging or unresponsive in the background, and sometimes malware. Even legitimate programs like CD Emulators (Daemon Tools, Alchohol 120%, Astroburn, AnyDVD) can trigger crashes, various stop error messages and system hangs so you may or may not be dealing with multiple issues. If the computer is overheating, it usually begins to shutdown/restart on a more regular basis. Troubleshooting for these kinds of issues can be arduous and time consuming. There are no shortcuts.

After my last post I noticed that the random reboots/restarts or crashes no longer occur. Could my system have fully recovered on its own?

If it was caused by a conflict with a program you were using and you removed it then yes. If it was caused by a loose connection somewhere and you tightened it down then yes. As you can see there are many causes of crashes and some are easily corrected even by accident.
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#7 holbrook

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 08:10 PM

i know im a bit late on the thread but i also had problems with avg tuneup 2011 removed it to find out windows system restore wouldnt run,found a fix on microsoft click start, run, paste this "regsvr32 jscript.dll" now system restore and wmp etc should now be fixed,idk if it helps in anyway but gl

#8 bethct

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 12:23 PM

Help F1 is disabled in all microsoft programs. Spell-check and grammar check is disabled, and there isn't even an English dictionary when I go to Word options and check proofing. Reading that some users lost these functions through a program such as McAfee, I traced back to when I started noticing the problems, and I believe it is connected with running the one-time free AVG tuneup 2011 to try and fix another problem.

I deleted AVG tuneup 2011 yesterday, but there was a question as to whether or not I wanted to delete the record of the changes that were made. I opted to save that. But now I don't know where that is.

If I didn't delete that file, can I still restore the registry?

I checked Vista's restore function, and the earliest points are after I installed AVG Tuneup 2011.

Any help most appreciated.

#9 quietman7

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 01:29 PM

Welcome to BC bethct

If you have an issue or problem you would like to discuss, please start your own topic. Doing that will help to avoid the confusion that often occurs when trying to help two or more members at the same time in the same thread. Even if your problem is similar to the original poster's problem, the solution could be different based on the kind of hardware, software, system requirements, etc. you are using and the presence of other malware. Further, posting for assistance in someone else's topic is not considered proper forum etiquette.

Thanks for your cooperation.
The BC Staff
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