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Computer will not start up properly


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#1 Justinscars

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 10:42 PM

Hello,

I have been working on this problem for a while now. I thought that it was a software problem. I have been working with gringo_pr. The topic is listed here:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic358837.html

He suggested that I post on this page to gain further help.

My computer is a custom built AMD 64 3500+ 2.21 GHz Prossecer, 1 GB Mem, 279 GB Maxtor HD, Windows XP Pro Servise Pack 2. I have 3 fans in total and all seem to be working correctly.

When the computer starts up it will start to load Windows and then just TURNS OFF.
I can restart and F8 in the start up and go into windows w/SAFE MODE, SAFE MODE/NETWORKING, OR / CMD PROMPT.
This takes serveral atemps to start and turn off before I can even get into windows. All in all I have tried to figure this out on my own wi8th little success. I downloaded SLW and it does not register a temp for the MB or the Processor.

It seems that the system overheated and I think that one or more parts were damaged. I opend the computer up and the heat sync was full of dust and debris. After a cleaning the system is still doing the same thing.

I hope that this is gives somone the info to help. Thanks in advance for any help.

Justin

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#2 Crazy49er

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 03:44 AM

Alright Mr. Justin, I see you had a nasty virus of sorts if I'm reading that last thread correctly. I'm thinking it may simply be a case of Windows itself being corrupted. But I'm no expert in that field so we'll poke the hardware pretty good and see what turns up first before doing anything drastic.

First program I'd like you to download if you haven't already is called Speccy (LINK) You'll need to be in safe mode with networking in order to access the program for download or you can run this program from a flashdrive/USB. It will take a complete hardware snapshot of the computer system, including number of cores and temperatures and it can be saved for remote viewing. No installation is needed, once the program is on the computer just run, and let it search for all the components on the PC.

Once it has found all the components on the PC: (Must be done with the Safe mode with networking option)

Go to File > Publish Snapshot > Yes

When you get the link save it for your own use, and copy it here for further viewing. (Example)

This will let us see what you're working with...

#3 Trezax

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 03:57 AM

What is the brand of psu? Sometimes bad psu may cause your system to shutdown.

#4 Justinscars

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:16 AM

What is the psu?

#5 Justinscars

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:21 AM

Here is the report:


the PSU is an ATX Switching mdle #ULT 350P

Attached Files


Edited by Justinscars, 26 November 2010 - 04:32 AM.


#6 Crazy49er

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 12:40 AM

I don't think it would be a Power Supply issue in this case because the shut downs if I am understanding this right are more logical in nature and not random like a power failure. It looks like speccy won't be able to collect much information while in safe mode. It seems to be a common thing with other system checking software I'm looking at. I looked into any DOS based programs, but none that will show system temperatures.

If you're looking into simply checking CPU, given the age of the PC and the dust you found inside. You could try unplugging the power cord, and removing the heat sink from on top of the CPU ( DO NOT TURN THE COMPUTER ON WITH THIS REMOVED ) just check the white/silver paste that is on top of the CPU chip and see if its dried up and crusty or if its still kinda liquid/pastey. I had a laptop recently with heat issues after 7 years and I replaced the paste on the unit and it stayed turned on after that. The paste is used to trasfer heat away from the CPU and to the heat sink acting like one solid piece and can be found readily at most electronics box stores or online for a few bucks. This is the best way I know without software to just see if the CPU may be overheating.

Obviously don't forget to replace the heat sink on top of the CPU before turning the computer back on or you really will need to buy both a new CPU and Motherboard.

I don't know of anyway to test the motherboard outside of using specialized DOS environmental software to do a burn in test, stress tests, and poking the various bits through PC Doctor. Maybe someone else has a better idea?

Edited by Crazy49er, 27 November 2010 - 12:41 AM.


#7 dc3

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 03:13 AM

Unless you have the thermal compound on hand I wouldn't remove the heat sink and fan assembly from the CPU. Any time that you remove this assembly you should clean the heat spreader and heat sink surfaces and reapply thermal compound.

You can download Everest Home Edition which will display the temperature of your CPU while in safe mode.

Because of the sudden manner in which this turns off I wouldn't rule out a bad connection. I would recheck all of the power connections, reseat all of the cards including the RAM, and check data connections.

You could also look in the Event Viewer to see what kind of errors are appearing.

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#8 Justinscars

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 01:13 AM

Here is a Report from Everest:

Justin

P.S. Here is the CPU Temp: Field Value
CPU 40 °C (104 °F)

Attached Files


Edited by Justinscars, 30 November 2010 - 01:16 AM.





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