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power supply compatibility


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#1 johnny157

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 11:51 PM

I have an older HP. It's a a1034n and it's got a Hipro HP-D2537F3R power supply on it, but it's been going dead lately and I want to get a new one before it damages anything. Anyways, I found two power supplies on Newegg that I'm stuck between and I don't know if they would be compatible. Thanks for any help!

First psu

Second psu

Edited by johnny157, 18 November 2010 - 11:52 PM.


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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 12:05 AM

Firstly, are you 100% sure its the power supply? what are the symptoms. Secondly, no need to waste to much money into a PSU for that old of a computer-no more then one would have to would be my advice. Those two would work but would be way overkill, unless your planning on starting a new build sometime soon, and then I would advise getting a much higher unit. No, for a build like that I would recomend a PSU such as this Its 10 dollars cheaper, from a good brand name. I don't tend to trust the brand names you listed, but I use coolermaster and Antec PSUs almost exclusively, especially coolermaster, and I have installed several of these PSUs that I just recomended in several older systems.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 johnny157

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 12:14 AM

Well it's been not fully turning on all the way at times. It will boot up, but it seems like only halfway and sometimes I'll try wiggling the power cord and then the psu will kick in and I can hear the fan just power up. At times when I'm running various programs (mostly just when I'm programming, listening to music, writing something, and researching) it will over heat and just shut off. Lately, I can notice my computer getting slower as well. My computer runs fine and I keep good care of it I even installed 2 more gigs of ram onto and this is the first time I've ever had some sort of hardware issue.

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 12:18 AM

If your comfortable with playing with electricity you can try these steps to verify the PSU is failing:
When a computer begins the boot process the motherboard initiates the start up of the PSU. Because of this it is difficult to determine whether the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU when a computer shows no signs of starting up. The purpose of the procedure is to determine if the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

This test is for ATX PSUs. Some manufacturers use non-ATX PSUs with 20/24 pin connectors that do not have the same pinout as a ATX PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

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From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case

I would also check your motherboard for any leaking or bulging capacitors, just to be on the safe side.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#5 johnny157

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 12:26 AM

I think I could try that out maybe tomorrow morning, but for the moment is there any other way to find out if it's the psu or the mobo that could be causing the problem? I should be clearer on the start up process. When it happens, it will boot up to the point of everything working except my monitor for some reason. When it's stuck in this position I try opening the drives and they will open up too, it's just my monitor like if it has enough power to power everything except my monitor. Once I hear the psu fan kick in and I can hear it, that's when my monitor seems to turn on.

#6 s1lents0ul

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 07:15 AM

Unless you have an all in one PC, the monitor is seperate from the computer, has its own power cord, and has nothing to do with the PSU. The PSU does power the Graphics Card however, which if requiring more wattage then your current PSU is putting out, would result in your monitor being on, with a black screen. It should recognize that problem in the POST when you first boot your computer up. You should take out a few variables from your build and see if the problem is fixed by removing any one of them.
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#7 johnny157

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 01:48 PM

Alright well thanks guys the both of you.
I'm almost sure that it's my power supply and I think I'll just go ahead and order a new one. The one last symptom I forgot to mention is that sometimes the supply fan will just die on me while my computer is on. I can notice because my computer will becomes unusually quiet and then my computer will start running slow.

#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 05:14 PM

Well, the other way to test it is like silent suggested, taking out peripherals-if your running a dedicated graphics card and have a integrated, take out the dedicated card and hook it up to the integrated card and see if that solves it, or by swapping the PSU out with a known working one.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 dc3

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Posted 20 November 2010 - 10:24 AM

You mention that when you wiggle the power cord the PSU will kick in and you can hear the fan running. Which fan are you referring to. The should be at least two fans, the one inside the PSU, and the one in the heat sink fan assembly on the CPU. Can you open the case and determine which one this is?

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