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GFX Heat issue...


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Swordie

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 11:00 PM

I have used a nVidia GeForce 8400 GS for roughly 4 months and as of lately, it has begun to stall out and freeze my entire computer up. I sense that perhaps the temperature of the card is extremely high, although I have not played any sort of 3D intensive games lately. Would the card "overheating" be causing the card to stall out? There are times where the computer will not even boot up with the 8400 GS and will switch to the chipset (which is a 6150 SE) in order to work. Is there any ways to fix this, without having to spend extra? Or am I better off just getting a new card, such as the 210 GTX?

Thank you.
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#2 bradumd

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 12:24 AM

Download speedfan

Check your temps.

You can also try cleaning the dust out of your computer which can help tremendously. Please read up on how to clean your computer if you are unfamiliar with the process as you can cause irreversible damage if you do not follow correct procedures.

#3 dc3

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 02:46 AM

If this is the Presario SR5710F that is listed in your profile the PSU could be your problem. If the information that I found is correct that computer's PSU is only rated at 250W. That graphics card requires a PSU with a minimum 300W PSU.

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#4 Swordie

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 03:16 PM

Dc3,
When I upgraded the card, I also upgraded the PSU to 350W. And I will definitely try getting all the dust out brad. Thank you.
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#5 dc3

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 03:21 PM

A can of "Duster" or similar canned air products do a good job of blowing out the fans and heat sinks.

Let us know if this reduces those temperatures.

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#6 Swordie

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 03:22 PM

I will definitely try it out. Thank you for the suggestion.
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#7 MrBruce1959

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 03:39 PM

The PSU to which is 350 WATTS is borderline to supply enough output to satisfy the graphics card and the other peripherals you have installed in your computer.

As dc3 stated above, your graphics card requires 300 WATTS minimum from the PSU.

Minimum means it will work with 300 WATTS, but with possible limitations and will run at a bare minimum.

Now, taking that 350 WATT output that the PSU is supplying, this has to be shared with the other hardware you have that is also drawing off of that 350 WATT output.

If for sake of argument, your PSU is outputting 350 WATTS, your Video card is drawing 300 WATTS, this leaves 50 WATTS left for your other hardware to use.

Competition becomes the result here, each piece of hardware starts fighting over the remaining 50 WATTS.

Something has to suffer here.

When one piece of hardware wins out over the others and it is the graphics card that suffers, your video will freeze up.

If your video card wins the battle, something else in the system has to suffer.

It actually becomes a catch 22 situation here, it becomes a win and lose situation at the same time.

When video cards with a rating of 300 WATTS are installed, a PSU that has a 500 WATT output rating is the bare minimum requirement. Provided you do NOT have a lot of USB devices drawing power from the system.

Hope this helps.

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#8 Swordie

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 06:04 PM

Bruce,
I understand completely what your saying, that the 350W must be shared among all of the parts in my computer. It would make sense as to why it works sometimes and why other times it does not. However, an article I had read about mentioned that a PCI-x16 Express slot on a MB has a limit to 75 Watts that it can give out to that particular port. And after some research, (this card DOESN'T have a fan, so the amount needed is not a extreme amount) it had shown that the card on the norm, uses 25 W.

I'm just guessing on a long shot here, but even in a case where it can only take 75W, would "overloading" it by making the card need to sap more energy resulting it crashing since it doesn't have enough energy to operate correctly?
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#9 dc3

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 08:59 AM

The suggested system requirements take into account the normal load of current systems and usually will add another 10% to provide a safe margin.

What is the make and model of the PSU that you replaced the original with? There's always the possibility that the PSU isn't performing properly. Have you check to see what the +12V and +5V rail voltages are under a load?

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