Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Actual storage capacity of a blank DVD disc


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Keith1

Keith1

  • Members
  • 504 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hamilton, Ohio
  • Local time:05:11 PM

Posted 05 November 2010 - 02:43 PM

I downloaded an .ISO file which is 4.5 GB - when I tried to burn it to a DVD I got an error message saying there isn't enough space on the disc. So I Googled about it and found out it's a "math thing" and the actual capacity is 4.38. Ok, no problem with that, I'll just have to pick up a dual layer DVD.

Now here's the point of my post - the salesperson at Staples told me that the actual storage capacity varies by brands. He said some actually hold 4.7 - any truth to that, or do you think he was just looking for a sale?

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 ThunderZ

ThunderZ

  • Deactivated
  • 4,454 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:11 PM

Posted 05 November 2010 - 02:50 PM

I would venture to say he is correct.

Similar to the variance in stated hard drive size vs. actual available storage usage size. Manufacturers can name something anything they like. Buyer beware.

It could be the math as well. Do`t think in this case though.

A while back there was a move to standardize measurements. ex: 1G would equal 1000 MB. Not 1024.

#3 Keith1

Keith1
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 504 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hamilton, Ohio
  • Local time:05:11 PM

Posted 06 November 2010 - 06:56 PM

Thanks for the info. Wish I would have thought to ask the salesperson - - - -

Which brand of dvd actually holds the entire 4.7 GB, and if I purchase them, open the pack, try one, and it doesn't copy my 4.5 GB file, do you guarantee that I can return the pack for a full refund? Just an after thought on that.

#4 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,698 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:03:11 PM

Posted 06 November 2010 - 08:47 PM

I don't think, DVD capacity depends on manufacturer. It's simply about math, not about the way, it's made, or who made it. The capacity is set at 4.7GB.
More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-R

I suspect, that during burning process some extra files are created (for instance, to make the DVD bootable) and all together, it exceeds 4.7GB

My Website

p4433470.gif

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click p22001735.gif


 


#5 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,741 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:05:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 01:24 PM

I also tend to think that...just as with a hard drive...a given portion of stated volume is reserved for formatting, file structure, etc.

There also are burn programs that purport to be able to squeeze additional capacity out of a given burn but I have no experience with this, since I read that it was unreliable in terms of burned disks.

Louis

#6 Keith1

Keith1
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 504 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hamilton, Ohio
  • Local time:05:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 01:58 PM

Ok, I'm not sure if it's the "extras" or the way they do the math, but I found this in properties of the .iso file, and it seems to explain why it won't fit on the standard DVD - - -

4.5 GB (4808915425 bytes)

#7 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,698 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:03:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 02:03 PM

4808915425 bytes equals exactly 4.5GB
That's because we're not dealing with decimal system here.
1kilobyte=1024bytes and so on

Edited by Broni, 07 November 2010 - 02:03 PM.

My Website

p4433470.gif

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click p22001735.gif


 


#8 Keith1

Keith1
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 504 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hamilton, Ohio
  • Local time:05:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 04:29 PM

Ok, thank you for the information..... guess it must be the "extra files" created. This has been very interesting and informative for me.

#9 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,698 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:03:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 04:52 PM

You're very welcome Posted Image

My Website

p4433470.gif

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click p22001735.gif


 


#10 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,471 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 05:54 PM

Ok, I'm not sure if it's the "extras" or the way they do the math, but I found this in properties of the .iso file, and it seems to explain why it won't fit on the standard DVD - - -

4.5 GB (4808915425 bytes)

That is correct, it's not related to any extras, the file is simply too large to fit on a single layer DVD.

Disk type Data sectors Capacity - bytes
DVD-R (SL) 2,298,496 4,707,319,808
DVD+R (SL) 2,295,104 4,700,372,992

From the above Wikipedia link.

Edited by Platypus, 07 November 2010 - 05:55 PM.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#11 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,698 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:03:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 06:05 PM

I beg to disagree...

4808915425 bytes equals exactly 4.5GB
That's because we're not dealing with decimal system here.
1kilobyte=1024bytes and so on

The file is NOT over 4.7GB.

My Website

p4433470.gif

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click p22001735.gif


 


#12 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,471 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 06:34 PM

We just have to apply the same conversion to both file and DVD.

File: 4808915425 bytes = 4.8GB = 4.5GiB
DVD: 4707319808 bytes = 4.7GB = 4.4GiB

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#13 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,698 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:03:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 06:37 PM

Yes, but little bit incorrect.
DVD - 4.7GB = 5046586572.8bytes, which will easily accommodate File: 4808915425 bytes, if not extras

My Website

p4433470.gif

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click p22001735.gif


 


#14 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,471 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:08:11 AM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 07:05 PM

No, the 4.7 figure for DVDs is GiB, not GB. As Keith1 said in his original post, actual capacity is 4.38 GB

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#15 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,698 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:03:11 PM

Posted 07 November 2010 - 07:14 PM

No. Same Wkipedia source:

Posted Image

My Website

p4433470.gif

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click p22001735.gif


 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users