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Lots of Devices (6) to connect


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#1 shiftplusone

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 01:49 PM

Hey!
I'm fairly computer experienced, however I will admit that I'm not up to snuff on all the networking knowledge. I'm moving in with a friend, and we have quite a few devices to connect. I'll give you our setups, and my idea behind what I want to do. Any suggestions or just letting me know my idea is right would be great.

Combined we have:
Two computers with 2xGigabit Ethernet ports
Two XBox 360's
Two Laptops

These will probably all be in the same room, and as ridiculous as it seems, might need all these objects running at the same time (With Internet/networking. Now, here's my idea:
I want to have a router, and an 8 port switch, connecting all the devices. My tactic is to connect one Ethernet from the router to each computer(two slots now used), then have one Ethernet go to the switch. From the switch, have one cable going to the computers for teaming (Both ports on computers now used), then have a cable that goes to each of the XBoxes and Laptops. We don't trust wireless (yeah, I said it), and would like to have the possibility of a wired connection to each of the devices simultaneously.

If my ideas on how a switch works are wrong, please let me know. I'm trying to figure this out before we move and would love the help and any suggestions! My iffiness is because I'm not sure if I have the idea on how a switch functions.

Any help is greatly appreciated, thank you so much!

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#2 s1lents0ul

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 12:45 PM

<edit1>Why use a router when you dont need its wireless function, just use the 8 port wired switch.?</edit1>

The wire map you have come up with will work. You idea of a switch is correct.

<edit2>a switch performs the function of the wired router side, but provides more wired connections. some also have firewalls built in, but im not familiar with that, and should not interfere in your case anyways.</edit2>

What kind of modem? If cable, is it Docis 3.0? <--better performance for such layouts.

Some FYI:

Cat 6 ethernet cords would provide optimum performance in this layout, they have a higher bandwidth then Cat 5a.

Do the switch and router have 10/100/1000 ports?

--The gigabit ethernet ports in your computers are insignificant otherwise, because the bottleneck is in the router/switch if not /1000. ya dig?

turn the wireless function off in your router if you do not wish to use it.

Edited by s1lents0ul, 05 November 2010 - 12:51 PM.

==]--s1lents0ul-->

#3 Baltboy

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 10:15 PM

Using CAT 5E is fine even for the gigabit ethernet. I would ditch the teaming on the PC's. Teaming only gives a performance advantage if all of the appliances on the network understand the teaming which more than likely they will not. You can simply hook a switch up to the router using one ethernet cable and then connect devices to the rest of the ports on the switch. I would suggest for simplicity and cost that you look into getting a router with an eight port switch built in to it. Plus unless you plan on swapping some large files over the network anything more than 100Mbps is overkill anyhow so save a few dollars there to if you want.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#4 shiftplusone

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Posted 06 November 2010 - 11:56 PM

Thank you for the replies.

We want both the router and switch for also having wireless. We will still be using the wireless, but do not want to reply on it. We're picky, if I'm to be honest.

S1lent, would you recommend the Docis over the stock Comcast modem (which I'm assuming is awful). I already am stocked on CAT6 since I currently run Gigabit in my current place.

Balt, Do you have a suggestion of a router with Gigabit, wireless, and 8 ports? I looked but that doesn't seem to exist unless I'm looking in the wrong places. We actually will be sharing MANY large files. Multi-Gb files will be very frequent. Most of our work is large-file digitally based media, but also heavy gaming for the leisure time. Also, what do you mean by "if all of the appliances on the network understand the teaming"?

Again thank you very much

#5 Baltboy

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Posted 07 November 2010 - 09:44 PM

The only router you may find like that would be a small business class cisco router which would be quite costly. Since you need gigabit I would go with your original proposal of a good dual band wireless N router(http://homestore.cisco.com/en-us/routers/Linksys-WRT610N-Wireless-N-Router-Front-Page_stcVVproductId53779501VVcatId552009VVviewprod.htm) with gigabit and a gigabit switch (http://homestore.cisco.com/en-us/Switches/linksys-EG008W_stcVVproductId53934572VVcatId543809VVviewprod.htm). As for a modem suggestion i have had a motorola surfboard for quite some time and have been extremely happy with it.

Teaming is used in server enviroments for fault tolerance and load balancing. So on your computer it will know and "understand" the teamed devices which will allow both devices to share the same LAN address. It should also alternate the transmision of data between the devices which in theory should speed up the transfer of data. However since the switch and router are not built to be aware that your computer or any other computer on the network has teamed NIC's when it sends the data to your computer ( or conversely when you send it to someone else) it will simply forward all packets recieved for that communication over one port to one NIC on your computer (or to the one you are trying to send it to) making that the bottleneck for data transmission and effectively making any advantage of having the NIC's teamed null and void. As for internet stuff cable/fios/DSL don't even come close to saturating a 100Mbps network so teaming (even if the network was aware) would not gain you any speed whatsoever.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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