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HP Mini Netbook - will not boot Windows after using Malwarebytes Anti-Malware to remove infection


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#1 Deenyc12345

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:37 PM

Hello:

First of all, thank you for your time in reading this post.

Question one: I have an HP Mini Netbook and was fortunate to have welcomed the Anti-virus Action infection, what a lovely experience. I have removed viruses before so I had Malwarebytes Anti-Malware on my desktop. Once the infection was confirmed, I rebooted in Safe Mode with Networking then ran Anti-Malware. The scan resulted in a few various infections which I removed. Then, it rebooted and I then ran another scan. Mid-scan, the computer shut down then rebooted. However, Windows is entirely unable to boot. It boots up then arrives to the screen where only options are enter F9 (boot device order) or F10 (BIOS). And if I do not select one of these two only options quickly it moves on to a blank black screen with a blinking "_" in the top upper left-hand corner, and there it stays. The hard drive must have been compromised or registry files damaged, you would know better than I based on the info I've given.

Trouble-shooting: I am able to hit Ctrl-Alt-Del and this reboots but just arrives to the same point. I can go into F9 or F10 but am unsure what actions to perform or configuration adjustments to help correct. Windows never boots.

My thoughts: some quick research online leads me to believe that I will need to reinstall Windows XP. So having a netbook I would need to get a CD drive connectable via USB, and I should purchase a Windows XP OS install disc, then take it from there. Or...is the netbook dead? THOUGHTS?

Question two: does McAfee suck?? I also have a desktop computer that is now infected with I believe the Defragmentor virus, yay. I am trying to identify how these are being transmitted. I do not go to any subversive sites, and I have been trying to use Opera browser to stay away from IE. Does anyone know if it is possible that such sites as parentwatch.com (a daycare live "nanny cam" site) or a virtual office site (a work site where I can log in and have a virtual office, e-mails, etc) could possibly be channels of entry for these fabulous infections? I have noticed that my increased usage of these sites corresponds to the arrival of the unwelcome infections coming my way.

Wishing everyone in Bleepingcomputer.com land a great weekend, and thank you for any feedback provided.

Dee

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#2 DaChew

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:52 PM

You can get help from an expert in trying to repair this damage or reload the computer?


Most netbooks have a restore partition since there's no cd drive

Recovery Manager is also accessible by pressing F11 during boot and allows users to recover the factory preinstalled image.

The recover manager allows you to perform the following by selecting the Yes button and then the Next button on the appropriate screen:

*
Software program re-installation:
o
If you select Yes and Next , you will see a software re-installation screen that helps you reinstall software that was included with your computer. Select Next and you will be provided a list of programs and be asked to choose which program you wish to reinstall. Follow the onscreen instructions.
o
If you select No and Next , you will be asked if you want the following:
*
Hardware driver re-installation:
o
If you select Yes and Next , you will see a hardware driver re-installer screen that helps you reinstall hardware drivers that were shipped with your computer. Select Next and you will be provided a list of drivers and be asked to choose which driver you wish to reinstall. Follow the onscreen instructions.
o
If you select No and Next , you will be asked if you want the following:
*
Microsoft system restore:
o
If you select Yes and Next , the Microsoft System Restore requires you to leave the Recovery Manager and by selecting Next , you will be forwarded to the Windows System Restore program. Follow the onscreen instructions.
o
If you select No and Next , you will be asked if you want the following:
*
Recover your computer to its original factory condition:
o
If you select Yes and Next , your computer will automatically start the shutdown procedure and reopen in the System Restore program. Be sure you want to completely restore your computer to its initial factory settings before proceeding. Otherwise select cancel.
o
If you select No and Next , you will be provided information for contacting HP Support. Clicking Finish will close the program.


Edited by DaChew, 29 October 2010 - 02:54 PM.

Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.

#3 ultrapeaceful

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:58 PM

if you can select F9, choose the hard drive as the first boot device. If it is not selected you won't boot.

#4 k_woodhouse

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 03:15 PM

My thoughts: some quick research online leads me to believe that I will need to reinstall Windows XP. So having a netbook I would need to get a CD drive connectable via USB, and I should purchase a Windows XP OS install disc, then take it from there. Or...is the netbook dead? THOUGHTS?


Check you're trying to boot from the right disk (might seem obvious, but easy to miss :thumbsup:).

If Windows doesn't boot, one of the first things I'd try is reinstalling it. A USB CD reader should work.

You could also consider creating a bootable USB, but I've not tried this with XP. Try this guide.
(Just a warning, I've not tried this, and I don't know how reputable the site is. Still, it's worth a try if you can't even boot. Just beware of any downloads it asks you to do. And a disclaimer: anything you do is not my fault =P)

Now, in both cases, you're going to need an XP installation disk. In theory, since XP was installed on the netbook, you own an XP licence, so you could try contacting whoever sold it to you, or Microsoft, to see if they would be so kind to give you one. I don't think they are under any obligation to do so though.

If you could boot, you could try this guide. It maybe something to try next time you get a pre-installed operating system with no disk.

You may end up having to pay for a disk, but hopefully you can avoid that. :flowers:

Question two: does McAfee suck??


Yes. I use it, and it's virus scan is appalling. It's real time protection isn't too bad, but it detects quite a few false positives (with no way of creating individual exceptions - one of my biggest gripes with it) and seems to have trouble detecting quite a lot of infections. For a regular scanner, just use MBAM.

Does anyone know if it is possible that such sites as parentwatch.com (a daycare live "nanny cam" site) or a virtual office site (a work site where I can log in and have a virtual office, e-mails, etc) could possibly be channels of entry for these fabulous infections?


It's possible. Do you trust the sites? If you do, there's probably nothing to worry about. Just be wary if you're asked to download things, enable permissions, activate plug-ins or controls in your browser, etc.

Hope I've been helpful :trumpet:

Edited by k_woodhouse, 29 October 2010 - 03:18 PM.


#5 Deenyc12345

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 06:35 PM

am thrilled with all these fine replies....thanks and I will explore further and advise any questions along the way.

Kwoodhouse, you mentioned in your reply about the sites I visit that as long as they do not have plug ins . These sites do have plug ins. Do you think this could be a cause of these viruses, and if so, is there any way to prevent them?

#6 k_woodhouse

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 08:53 AM

I wouldn't recommend preventing most plug-ins from running, since they're normally required for certain content.

Consider what a plug-in is: "a piece of software that adds functionality to an existing piece of software". For example, media plug-ins allow you to view audio and video content without downloading it and opening another application. Disabling plug-ins may prevent these sites from working altogether. Say, if you stopped the flash player, you would no longer be able to view a large number of websites, watch streaming videos or play flash games.

What I meant is just be aware when they ask for a plug-in. Consider looking them up on the internet to see if they're legitimate before installing them. As with any software you download, make sure you trust the source first. Normally, though, it's perfectly safe to use browser plug-ins.

You should also be aware of potential exploits in legitimate plug-ins (such as Adobe's Flash Player, which had a major potential exploit discovered in 2008). Adobe have since released updates addressing the problem, so be sure to keep your software up to date (consider using Secunia's Online Software Inspector or the desktop version (for a more complete scan) - Personal Software Inspector. They scan your computer for out of date software and link to updates).

Still, the bottom line is be careful. Just make sure you're aware of websites and software that you don't fully trust. Consider giving them a quick google to see if anyone else has had bad experiences using particular websites or software. The security warnings your browser and computer give are there for a reason. Use them as a reminder that there is a chance your download isn't what you think it is.

You're probably fine using these sites, so I wouldn't just assume they're your problem. If you need help cleaning up your computer, and advice on keeping it clean, look here. Our fellow bleepers are experts at dealing with malware. Someone there may be able to help you determine the cause of your problem. Ask around, I'm sure someone has had similar problems.

Last thing, what browser and plug-ins do you use with these sites? It may help determine if they are safe to use or not.

#7 Deenyc12345

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 03:20 PM

Very good information, thank you. For the two sites I used IE and one was a citrix plugin of some sort, and the other is an activex plugin. I would offer further info but my computer is currently still fighting off this defragmentor virus. Speaking of, I followed instructtions on excising this infection but no luck so far, it seems quite attached to my computer. I also downloaded super antispyware which did find a number of infections but nothing has been able to get rid of the defragmentor yet. do I need to log in as the administrator and as the one account set up, one or the other or both when I run the scans? Thanks!

#8 k_woodhouse

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 03:48 PM

I've not used the Citrix plug-in but it seems to be fairly reputable. However, a vulnerability was found for the Citrix XenApp Online Plug-in for Windows fairly recently.

I couldn't say if this was the cause of your infection, but it is possible. Read the information in the link and it should help you ensure you have the safest, most recent version.

I would offer further info but my computer is currently still fighting off this defragmentor virus.

This sounds like quite a bad infection, so I would definitely recommend checking out the Virus, Trojan, Spyware, and Malware Removal Logs forum and making a topic about your infection. Follow the guide to posting in this forum and you'll soon get some fantastic advice (and it's free :thumbsup:).

They helped clean an infection up for me, and they'll definitely do a better job at removing your infection than a handful of anti-virus and anti-spyware software.

do I need to log in as the administrator and as the one account set up, one or the other or both when I run the scans?

I'm not entirely sure what you mean.

If you're asking whether you should log in as an administrator, then yes. A full scan logged in as the admin should scan the entire disk drive, so there is no need to repeat the scan for individual user accounts.

If you're in Windows Vista, you should run the scanner as an administrator. When you open the application, instead of left-clicking, right-click and select 'Run as administrator':
(Note: there's no need to run every application as an admin, it just gives the scanner extra permissions that might help it clean up an infection.)

Posted Image
Fig.1: Running as administrator.

This should work if the executable file is in locations other than the start menu, such as on your desktop or in a file folder.

Edited by k_woodhouse, 30 October 2010 - 05:23 PM.


#9 Orange Blossom

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 04:23 PM

Hello,

I suspect your booting issues on the first computer is due to remaining malware issues. As for the second, that is a new infection. Each will require specialized assistance. For EACH computer, please follow the instructions in ==>This Guide<==. If you cannot complete a step, skip it and continue.

Once the proper logs are created, then make a NEW TOPIC and post it ==>HERE<== Please include a description of your computer issues and what you have done to resolve them.

If you can produce at least some of the logs, then please create the new topic and explain what happens when you try to create the log(s) that you couldn't get. If you cannot produce any of the logs, then still post the topic and explain that you followed the Prep. Guide, were unable to create the logs, and describe what happens when you try to create the logs.

Please be sure to create a SEPARATE topic for each computer and include in the title something along the lines of {computer 1} {computer 2} to avoid potential confusion. Dealing with more than one computer in the same topic is horribly confusing for all concerned.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:
Help us help you. If HelpBot replies, you MUST follow step 1 in its reply so we know you need help.

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#10 noknojon

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 07:38 PM

Question two: does McAfee suck??

As you have been told above , Yes - The latest versions are even worse -
You may have a few problems with Malwarebytes and McAfee running together as their forum says to disable McAfee while running Malwarebytes -
Please follow Orange Blossom on this one -

Thank You -




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