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Did I just fry my motherboard?


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#1 DerBear89

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 08:48 PM

You guys may have remembered I had an underload of power. so today I picked up the new power supply and intalled it (750 from 500). In my stupidity I did not connect the 4 pin to the cpu and I booted.... The fans flickered for maybe less than a second then turned off. I hasseled around a bit to see if all was plugged in right, (thats when I discovered the 4pin) plugged that in then nothing happened.

Just to be sure I did not do any serious damage I plugged the old power supply in to test it. Again nothing happens no beeps, no fans, the only thing that shows a sign of life is the standy light on the motherboard but that is it.

I really hope I didn't just blow up my computer.

what do you guys think?

also checked the power button cord and other misc. items

Edited by DerBear89, 29 October 2010 - 02:54 AM.


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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 11:21 PM

Hmmmmm. long shot in the dark, but I would start by resetting the CMOS, and double checking your heatsink and making sure it is properly installed, and not knocked loose.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 DerBear89

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:51 AM

I took everything out of the computer. stripped it down to just the motherboard itself, even checked the stand-offs the make sure nothing was getting blocked. took out the motherboard battery and let it sit for a minute as others suggested. After that I plugged in just the bare essentials and tried to boot. Still nothing but a standby light.

I hope that the motherboard was not so easy to fry that when I failed to plug something in it would be fatal to it.

any other ideas. The computer is barely a month old. the MB is an Intel DH55HC by the way

#4 s1lents0ul

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 08:37 AM

Well underpowered electronics such as motherboards, are more prone to failure when powered below there requirements, then if over powered, because there are fuses and things in place to stop overpowering or overheating issues, but fail safes to shutoff devices when underpowered arent so common.

From what I have been reading, you can indeed power the system without harm by only using the 20 pin connector. If I understood what I read so far, the 4 pin connector is for the PCI-E slots. I know that usually cards plugged into PCIe slots are GPU an have thier own connections comming from the PSU.

Have you tried booting the system without the video card inserted? Using the on-board video VGA port to run a monitor?

I have also read that the newer Intel boards require the extra 4 pin connector to work properly, and perhaps could cause problems like the one
you are having.

EDIT BELOW(found this very informative)

This is copied off a forum from Anandtech...
Poster's name... flexy

(Q) the new "xyx" motherboard has a 24pin plug - so do i need a new 24pin PSU ?

Not necessarely. All the upcoming new boards (eg. Nforce 4) SHOULD be capable of running with an "old" ATX 1.3 20pin-plug equipped PSU as well as with a new ATX 2.0 24pin PSU.

The question here is rather whether the PSU itself is a good brand name PSU with sufficient wattage. Dont expect a recent high-end system with pci-express card(s) and A64 CPU to run flawlessly off an old 350W noname PSU.

(Q) but what about the extra 4 pins on the PSU plug/motherboard connector ?

These four extra pins on the newer ATX 2.0 PSUs are solely for providing power to the pci-express port . I guess the specs demanded a separation of the power-rails for CPU/motherboard and high-end graphics.
Therefore they put the additional rails on the plug/motherboard which provides +12V, +5V, +3.3 and GND to the pci-express slot.

(Q) So..but i got/plan to get a pci-express card !

pci-express cards will MOSTLY have an external power-connector (6 pin pci-express). You can connect two unused molex connectors from your PSU to this connector on the graphic card via an adapter. If you dont have this adapter - newegg has one
pci-express power adapter

(!) a single connector/wire on a PSU/connector is usually rated at a max. power draw of 6A. Wattage = VOLTS*A.
The maximum wattage for ONE 12V connector is therefore 72A. The two molex connectors are combined since a high-emd graphic card usually uses MUCH MORE than 72W..therefore it uses two molex which should be ok for up to 144 Watts.

THATS why the pci-ex graphics card SHOULD be able to run fine even WITHOUT the 24pin motherboard connector and WITHOUT a newer PSU with 24pin plug. The card gets enough power already and does not REALLY need the power from the PSU plug.

Thats why the newer boards are USUALLY comaptible with either 20pin PSUs or 24pin PSUS.

[As a sidenote] A pci-express card with NO external power connector which would get the power solely from the pci-port can (therefore) only draw a max. 72W. The current high-end cards all draw much more power. Eg. a Geforce 6800 Ultra is listed as using as much as 110 Watts. There is no way to do this with just the power coming from the 6A/72Watts rated pci-slot

(Q) But wouldnt it be just better to get a newer ATX 2.0 24pin PSU which is "pci-express ready" ?
First..."pci-express" ready is just a stupid market term. See above. It doesnt need to bother you if the graphics card has an external connector and you got a good strong 20pin PSU.
"pci-express ready" will usually only mean that the PSU will have a 6pin pci-express power plug. Which is not bad and saves you the hassle to get the adapter in case the card does NOT come with one.

Another advantage of the newer ATX 24pin PSUSsis that they USUALLY have dual, separate 12V rails. (One 12V rail provides power for eg. CPU, the other rail is separate and provides power for the pci-express card.)
This is not necessarely bad In other words: You cant go wrong with a new 24pin PSU for various reasons. But this does not mean that your older 20pin one is obsolete. Especially not if its a good brand name one with suffcient power.

(Q) I got a 20pin PSU and i will get the "xyx" motherboard which uses a 24pin connector. So...i can get one of these PSU "20pin -> 24pin adapters" to make my old 20pin PSU 24pin compatible ?

See above. I dont THINK you really need one. But..there are certain *concerns* regarding this "20pin to 24pin" adapter. Do NOT confuse with the "24pin -> 20pin" adapter which often comes with new ATX 2.0 motherboards.

The 20pin->24pin PSU adapter will split your ONE rail/wire (eg. the 12V rail) coming from your PSU in two and create the "artificial" extra 4 pins.

The result is that your PSU will draw much more power from the one rail than it was originally intended to. While a real "dual rail" PSU will provide two seperate rails the solution with the adapter will draw twice the power now from one 'wire'.
What was rated at 72W max. before (remember ? 6A * 12V = 72 W) will now all of a sudden draw up to a max. of 144 watts.
Also..the thermal load (eg. heat !) will increase 4 (four !) times.
The most strain wil be on the adapter/plugs itself. You will get some nice, hot wires and plugs...

I cannot see this as an elegant solution - HOWEVER it might work.
But remember: You probably wont even NEED the adapter.

Just plug your 20pin old PSU plug in the new 24pin connector on the mobo (its downwards compatible !) the right way...leave the four extra pins out. This SHOULD work and you wont really need an 20p -> 24p adapter !

(Q) My older 20 pin PSU has this extra 4pin connector with the two yellow and two black wires ? Can i use this to "fill up" the missing 4 pins on the 24pin connector on the motherboard ? Isn't that what it's for ?

NO NO NO..DONT EVEN THINK ABOUT IT !!!

This is the 12V CPU connector which you use to provide juice to the CPU, there is another 4 pin connector on the motherboard especially for this.
Dont even think about using this (YES, i saw people considering this option!) - except you need a sure way to fry your board !

There is a smaller (?) number of newer 24pins PSUs out there who actually *do* have
detachable 4 extra pins on the main connector - so you can attach it to the 20pin connector and have a 24pin connector.

But even if it might look about the same....do NOT confuse this with the 4pin 12V CPU connector !

the reason why many people might run into problems with their older 20 pin PSUs is that MANY (even brand name) PSUs are rather weak on the 12V rails.
15A or 18A PSUs with only ONE rail are (still) quite common.

Now picture a graphic card using 110 W under load which would be a power draw of 9.2 A alone for the card ! (Assuming it would all come off the 12V rail).

If your PSU has only 15A on the rail...well...subtract 9.2A and this doesnt leave MUCH for the rest of the system, ESPECIALLY if you overclock !
You will run into problems, but not primarly because you dont have the 24pin connector.
A 20pin -> 24pin PSU adapter would not "magically" provide more power/amperes and not solve your problem.

Either consider a new PSU with dual rails with TWO 12V rails with *at least* 15A on EACH rail...or a STRONG 20pin PSU with plenty Amps on ONE rail...at least 25A or more !


Edited by s1lents0ul, 29 October 2010 - 08:46 AM.

==]--s1lents0ul-->

#5 DerBear89

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 12:28 PM

I was under the impression this 4 pin plug powered the cpu, and i did something wrong when i did not plug it in and tryed to turn it on. I think i read somewhere if this is not pluged in at boot than the prossesor can take more than 100w of power which is not good.

#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:44 PM

No, your impression is right, silent is a bit confused-he thinks you are talking about the 20+4 on connector that supplies the motherboards main power (many PSUs have this feature to allow backward compatibility with the older, 20 pin motherboards) the 4 pin connector that is seperate, by itself, is only for the CPU. Though, silent soul is right-going from a underpowered state, to all the sudden fully powered can, indeed cause damage to components. (I sincerely doubt it was forgetting to plug in the CPU power, though its possible) You say said computer is only a month old, then in theory it should still be covered under warranty-you should be able to RMA for a new board.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#7 DerBear89

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 04:48 PM

if I were to cash in on the warrenty does that include my proccesor? is there any way to tell for sure if its just the board or if the power overload took anything else with it?

#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:31 PM

well that would depend-if your computer is a pre-built from the factory, that warranty should cover (I dont know the specifics, youd have to read your warranty info packet, should have come with the computer) anything that is defective. If it is a custom built computer, especially if its one you built yourself, then the CPU and the motherboard will be covered by seperate warranties-as they came from diffent companies. Again, the warranty info should have been included in the paperwork for the product. If you bought all the parts from newegg, they may/may not be covered under neweggs plan as well.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 DaChew

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:41 PM

I can't find that 4 pin plug socket for the cpu on intel's website, poor suport and graphics.

Newegg had a better picture for a comparable model?


http://www.newegg.com/Product/ImageGallery.aspx?CurImage=13-121-394-Z03&SpinSet=13-121-394-RS&ISList=13-121-394-Z01%2c13-121-394-Z02%2c13-121-394-Z03%2c13-121-394-Z04%2c13-121-394-Z05&S7ImageFlag=1&Item=N82E16813121394&Depa=0&WaterMark=1&Description=Intel%20BOXDH55TC%20LGA%201156%20Intel%20H55%20HDMI%20Micro%20ATX%20Intel%20Motherboard

The plug to the top left of the cpu socket?
Chewy

No. Try not. Do... or do not. There is no try.

#10 Queen-Evie

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:46 PM

Read your warranty. If you do have a pre-built factory system, you may have voided the warranty by replacing the power supply.

There's probably a clause that says something to the affect that it won't cover problems caused by using parts not supplied by the computer manufacturer.

#11 the_patriot11

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 06:41 PM

edit for my own stupidity.

Edited by the_patriot09, 29 October 2010 - 06:42 PM.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#12 DerBear89

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 06:55 PM

I can't find that 4 pin plug socket for the cpu on intel's website, poor suport and graphics.

Newegg had a better picture for a comparable model?


http://www.newegg.com/Product/ImageGallery.aspx?CurImage=13-121-394-Z03&SpinSet=13-121-394-RS&ISList=13-121-394-Z01%2c13-121-394-Z02%2c13-121-394-Z03%2c13-121-394-Z04%2c13-121-394-Z05&S7ImageFlag=1&Item=N82E16813121394&Depa=0&WaterMark=1&Description=Intel%20BOXDH55TC%20LGA%201156%20Intel%20H55%20HDMI%20Micro%20ATX%20Intel%20Motherboard

The plug to the top left of the cpu socket?



yes that is the exact same as mine, and yes it is that 4 pin plug to the upper left of the cpu. that was the one i failed to plug in and is apparently causing me problems

#13 the_patriot11

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 07:22 PM

is it a prebuilt or custom computer?

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#14 DerBear89

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 07:30 PM

is it a prebuilt or custom computer?



custom built the psu is the only thing i have swapped though cause the 500w was not cutting it

#15 DerBear89

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 03:03 PM

Read your warranty. If you do have a pre-built factory system, you may have voided the warranty by replacing the power supply.

There's probably a clause that says something to the affect that it won't cover problems caused by using parts not supplied by the computer manufacturer.



I ordered from tiger direct. Do I contact them or do I contact intel directly in order to redeem warrenty.




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