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Bitdefender Total Security 2010


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#1 astro202

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 08:14 PM

Hi All
I feel I have to vent and I am sorry in advance for doing it here. Let me first say that this site and its content and the professionals behind the scenes helping members detect and clean viruses etc. from the average guys PC are to be highly commended.

I first stumbled onto this site a year ago searching for a cure to clean my wifes PC from a nasty virus/trojan and the materials and downloads saved my wifes PC. It is her work from home PC.

Her PC now is infected again so severely this time that I am unable to get on the INTERNET to download the essential tools as per the instructions on this site to post the log files.

My complaint is that Bitdefender customer service is a PIECE OF CRAP!! I had contacted them several times and spent hours on the phone waiting on hold then explaining the same thing to different techs over and over again and being promised that I will either receive an email with a link to a download for rescue files or a personal phone call to resolve the situation and it has been going on for weeks. Bitdefender Total Security 2010 purchaed for 3 PC's did not detect nor clean the infection.

I am now in the process of wiping out the harddrive and reinstalling XP and all her programs, restoring all her data from Carbonite to her fresh install and then going to the APPLE store to purchase a MAC POWER BOOK PRO and have her PC Windows merged over to the MAC till she is caught up and then that partition will be deleted!! Goodbye WINDOWS and goodbye VIRUS writers!! If I had the guy who wrote this last virus in my presence I would beat him severely and then cut his hands off with my chainsaw!!

BTW, you tech guys are not given enough credit for enduring what yo have to do to keep everyones PC clean. After being on this site just a few times makes me wonder why everyone puts up with this virus attack on PC's. The definition of INSANITY is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

Edited by astro202, 25 October 2010 - 08:17 PM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 08:55 PM

Sorry to hear about your encounter with BitDefender Support. What you experienced should not happen to anyone but unfortunately it does with many support services.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. Just because one anti-virus detected threats that another missed, does not mean its more effective. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense, safe computing and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.

Thank you for your kinds words about our staff. They are all volunteers who assist members because they know how frustrating malware infections can be and want to help when they can.
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#3 chromebuster

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 09:50 PM

Piece of advice. Don't leave windows behind simply because your wife was infected with a piece of malware. It's not always the user's fault if they get infected now with all of the hacked sites these days. Both the pC and the Mac have their good points, and just because you switch computer types, you'll always be on the lookout for Malware. Malware authors are starting to try and attack more and more Macs these days too, and you can look it up on Google or Bing if you don't believe me. There's tons of blogs pertaining to this, and though there aren't as many threats for the Mac, there's more and more coming. Look at it. The mac may be less troublesome for you, but don't expect it to be foolproof. Just my words of caution and my two cents. watch out. and if anyone else with more experience sees this, please don't be afraid to criticize or correct me if need be.

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#4 astro202

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 06:21 AM

I am in the process, as I type this, of restoring her harddrive with Windows and a few of her essential business programs so that she may retrieve those files from Carbonite and resume some of her work and end using her laptop. Thanks goodness she had that with one crucial piece of software so she was able to do some work.

Quietman7, you are so correct insaying that safe computing and where one browses the net may sometimes yield unwanted malware. She is politically active so along with her business sites and friends on facebook (which BTW. I have lectured her NOT opening some of the things there) she does not navigate to areas where threats are more imminent. In your honest opinion then what what would you advice to install for PC protection. I will remain on a PC for some of her video editing (because I have the software)and we will install a dual boot on her new MAC when she gets it.

Chromebuster, the APPLE store did indicate that there a more viruses being written for the MAC environment and we will be taking the necessary steps to avoid any such issues. As stated above, I will remain on the PC til death due us part. I do realize that not every antivrus program will detect every single bit of infections out there but I do expect after plunking down aver a hundred bucks for a Total Security Suite and not just a FREE version should be more deserving of respect!!

Keep up the good work guys in your relentless yet futile work of ridding members PC's of chit!! LOL

#5 quietman7

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 06:59 AM

No matter what security tools you install, unsafe user practices will help defeat that protection so you need to educate. Ask her to read:
Also be sure to warn her that in some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to a system that it cannot be successfully cleaned, repaired or trusted. Security vendors that claim to be able to remove rootkits and backdoor Trojans cannot guarantee that all traces of will be removed as they may not find all the remnants. Further, if something goes awry during the malware removal process there is always a risk the computer may become unstable or unbootable and she could loose access to all her data.
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#6 astro202

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 08:03 AM

QUIETMAN7 Thank you for providing those links for her to read. I will see to it that she does. The troubling part of all this is she is so much more cautious about computing than me however she does love her music downloads and I believe Limewire may have been a part of that obsession.

And yes, the system was so unstable and infected that multiple tries of scans, updates, and "RESTORE" functions from the Window XP CD left me with no choice but to reformat, partition and reinstall XP. Actually, it required 3 tries to successfully install WinXP even after removing the MBR sector. A few scans with FREE Avast indicates there are no issues with the system. Any other program recomendastions to install? How about PCTools registry program and PCTools antiapyware? Any good?
Thanks for your help and advice.

#7 quietman7

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 08:45 AM

Using any Torrents, peer-to-peer (P2P) or file sharing program (i.e. Limewire, eMule, Kontiki, BitTorrent, uTorrent, BitLord, BitLord, BearShare, Azureus/Vuze) is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, and exposure of personal information.

The reason for this is that file sharing relies on its members giving and gaining unfettered access to computers across the P2P network. This practice can make you vulnerable to data and identity theft, system infection and remote access exploit by attackers who can take control of your computer without your knowledge. Even if you change the risky default settings to a safer configuration, downloading files from an anonymous source increases your exposure to infection because the files you are downloading may actually contain a disguised threat. Many malicious worms and Trojans, such as the Storm Worm, target and spread across P2P files sharing networks because of their known vulnerabilities. In some instances the infection may cause so much damage to your system that recovery is not possible and a Repair Install will NOT help!. In those cases, the only option is to wipe your drive, reformat and reinstall the OS.

Even the safest P2P file sharing programs that do not contain bundled spyware, still expose you to risks because of the very nature of the P2P file sharing process. By default, most P2P file sharing programs are configured to automatically launch at startup. They are also configured to allow other P2P users on the same network open access to a shared directory on your computer. The best way to eliminate these risks is to avoid using P2P applications.

Have her read:
As for PC Tools Anti-spyware, I don't have any info on how effective it is. As for PC Tools Registry program...

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

:inlove: Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

:flowers: Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

:thumbsup: Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

:trumpet: Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

:) The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.
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#8 chromebuster

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 07:10 AM

yes there are. Forget PCTools altogether. it sucks. Go for Eset's security Sweet called Smart Security. I love Eset to death, and it is better than all of the other AV products I've tried. Eset is a small company with frendly support staff, their program has a clean interface, and the trojans they cannot clean (which is an exceptional few), they can at least tame for you till you get something on the computer that can clean it like MBAM in some cases. My friend uses kaspersky internet Security, and she has never gotten a single infection with it. Keep that in mind.

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