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Crash in Windows 7, cannot boot now


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#1 coggas

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 05:19 PM

It all started with a complete system freeze while playing Team Fortress 2 on Windows 7.

I restarted my computer, and I couldn't even get it to POST. I removed all hardware except one stick of RAM. Still wouldn't post. After reading online, I found some suggestions to reset the CMOS on the motherboard under the current hardware conditions. This worked, but upon getting to the windows load screen, my monitor went blank. After waiting a while, nothing happened. I powered it down, turned it back on, and it wouldn't even display the BIOS splash screen, POST information, nothing.

Now, if I don't reset the CMOS and I let it go through the BIOS splash screen, through to the boot process, it wants to start the windows catastrophic recovery process. Offers Safe Mode, etc. None of the options given do anything. I've tried using the Windows installation disc to try to repair drivers/critical system files, and it has the DOS-style loading bar at the bottom, but after that, nothing.

Any help would be appreciated, I am really at my wits end. I've spent way too much time on this computer, trying to self diagnose. I fear for the worst...that my motherboard is toast.

Thanks in advance.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 06:15 PM

Well...if it's a desktop, I'd try replacing the CMOS battery.

If a laptop, I just don't know.

Louis

#3 coggas

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 12:50 AM

Well...if it's a desktop, I'd try replacing the CMOS battery.

If a laptop, I just don't know.

Louis


Do you think that the bad battery is causing the computer to have issues even when it's connected to a power supply at all times?

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 12:59 AM

Its possible, if not its only a 3 dollar fix you can get said batteries from the jewelry department at your local wal-mart. Just remove your old and get the number off of it.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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