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Grandson's Football Game Film -I need to edit and highlite him in interior offensive line


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#1 bsgranpa

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 02:01 PM

OK, my grandson needs to send a DVD to college coaches in hopes of a scholarship offer. If I have a game recorded on DVD and want to zoom in to give a better view of his play at left tackle and on the defensive line. And/or I would like to "highlight" him like they do with hockey pucks so he's easier to follow. So, I need to know how to take the existing DVD, take the video and manipulate it to allow an easier time watching a single player, and see if there is an easy to do some kind of special effect so that the viewer can follow him in the mass of the interior line. The game film is of the entire field shot from the top of the press box.

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#2 Capn Easy

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 04:51 PM

I don't know of any package that would do that, perhaps someone else will be able to help.

But, if it was me, I wouldn't edit the video itself. I would save individual frames as still pictures, then zoom, highlight, and annotate the stills. I would also label the stills with the time index so the applicable scenes could be found easily. There's a lot easier learning curve, and much less risk of spoiling the video.


Whatever you choose, good luck!

#3 bsgranpa

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 04:56 PM

How many frames are there in two plus hours of game film? How then do I make a movie of the frames?

#4 Capn Easy

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 08:06 PM

I was suggesting an alternate to editing the movie. To provide the full movie with annotated stills.

#5 bsgranpa

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 08:14 PM

I don't think that approach is very workable for my purposes. Thanks for your interest and help.

#6 Hawkes

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 08:19 PM

bsgranpa,

Do you currently have any video editing software installed on your computer? If so, can you tell us what it is and what version?

One of the cheaper ways to do it would be with Windows Movie Maker(FREE). Pixelan Software makes an add-on called AccentFX Pro that will do exactly what you are looking to do with both still images and video. You can buy just that particular wizard for $15 USD or bundle it and pick up some other nice add-ons that they make. Once you decide if this is something that will work for your purposes, you will need to rip the video from the DVD. This article (http://www.windowsmoviemakers.net/PapaJohn/19/From_DVD_Disc_to_Movie_Maker.aspx) seems to be well written and can walk you through those steps.

Let me know if you have any other questions and I can try to assist you further.

-Hawkes

Edited by Hawkes, 21 October 2010 - 08:29 PM.

-Hawkes

#7 bsgranpa

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 11:45 AM

Hawkes, thank you very much. I will try this out as soon as I get a new laptop. My 7 yr. old Toshiba has "bit the dust". Even with fresh install after fresh install, I can't get Windows to load even in safe mode. I have run out of all my feeble knowledge to troubleshoot and I guess that seven years is better than average. Do you have a "favorite" in the family of laptops? Especially if I am going to try to learn some of this video technology and put it into practice. Or, do you have suggestions regarding the type of features a laptop needs in order to work in this arena more effectively? Thanks for your help. As always, I have been very grateful for the expert and generous souls here who devote time to help computer greenhorns like me.

#8 Hawkes

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 12:25 PM

bsgranpa,

Honestly, if you are going to start doing some video editing then you are ready to upgrade anyway. Here are some suggestions...

1) Core i7 if possible, but not less than core i5
2) At least 4 GB of ram
3) 17" widescreen (unless the weight is too much for you)
4) 500GB hard drive if you can swing it
5) an external hard drive for storage, back up or both

Now, it shouldn't go without saying that a laptop like this is going to be more expensive than most. Personally, I have two machines that I use... at home is my desktop and on the road is my laptop. My desktop I built last year and is a core i7 with 6GB of ram and 1 TB of hard drive storage with an external hard drive for backing up. You are NOT going to want to start creating videos without some way of backing up your creations. My laptop is a Dell Studio 1558 and does a decent job although rendering is a bit slower since it is a core i5 and 4GB of ram. I didn't buy it with the intention of editing video, but I can do it without getting frustrated if I really need to.

I suggest you stop by your local big box store like Best Buy or Staples and take a look at some of what they offer. Spend some time looking at screen size, sensing the weight, fell of the keyboard, etc. This will help you make a punchlist of pros and cons so that you can begin limiting what does and doesn't work for you.

Good luck and let me know how things work out.
-Hawkes




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