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what about Drivers?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 cobra5000

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 12:24 PM

Hi,
getting ready for my first attempt at installing linux.
and i am wondering what do people do about the drivers needed?
i assume there would be about as many needed as for a windows install but i am not really sure.
are linux users generally expected to write their own drivers?
thanks

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#2 ice2921

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 12:52 PM

What distribution are you going to use? Most versions of Linux have built in drivers for a variety of hardware. It also depends on what hardware you are going to use. What is your current setup?

#3 cobra5000

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 12:58 PM

hi,
well, seeing as it is my first attempt, it seems like ubuntu is a good beginners' distro but i would use the distro that is most beginner freindly.

my thoughts were to install onto an external hd and boot from a usb, assuming the bios on my toshiba satellite A305 allows that feature.

and if the external hd route is too complicated for a beginner like me, i might buy a second hand laptop and install on the internal hd.

#4 ice2921

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 01:04 PM

Yeah stick with Ubuntu, its perfect for beginners. For performance reasons I would recommend installing on a dedicated machine. Certainly you could install it on an external devices as well. Ubuntu has great documentation on this found here:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation

Really it comes down to what you want to do.

#5 cobra5000

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 02:17 PM

Ok Thanks,
per my initial question,
should i conclude then that drivers really arent a problem with Linux installations?

because in the reading i have done i dont see that much mentioned about driver installations, and as you said,
there are some drivers included with the installation.

#6 Andrew

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 03:35 PM

Most devices will work out of the box with no need for drivers or additional software. Some hardware, especially video cards, will require additional proprietary drivers to function at peak performance. Ubuntu will let you know if any such drivers are available and ask if you wish to automatically download and install them. Another class of device that can be troublesome is wifi adapters, especially cheap USB dongles. The situation has improved vastly in the last 1-2 years, but there are still sometimes glitches (and work arounds, thankfully.)

#7 ice2921

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 03:51 PM

Andrew pretty much summed it up with what you need to be careful with concerning drivers. You just need to figure out which route you want to go, USB device, external Drive, second hand laptop. The Toshiba BIOS can be pretty funky at times at least some of the older ones. You should be fine with yours.

Edited by ice2921, 09 October 2010 - 03:52 PM.


#8 buddy215

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 04:04 PM

And if you wait till tomorrow, (Oct 10) you can get the latest greatest Ubuntu 10.10. You won't need to
download half a gig of updates or more.
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#9 Andrew

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 06:30 PM

Last I heard, the release date for 10.10 is the 28th of this month, not the 10th.

#10 buddy215

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 07:11 PM

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MaverickReleaseSchedule

That is where I got the info.

Being released on a Sunday is a bit odd, and I was surprised it wasn't the last of the month, too.

Edited by buddy215, 09 October 2010 - 07:16 PM.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#11 Andrew

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 08:00 PM

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MaverickReleaseSchedule

That is where I got the info.

Being released on a Sunday is a bit odd, and I was surprised it wasn't the last of the month, too.

Eh, I could very easily be wrong. :thumbsup:

#12 cobra5000

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 09:51 PM

ok, thanks for the good news.
make sense that Ubuntu 10.10 would get released on 10/10.

i would like to install on an external hd, and run from there.
so i will see what happens.

so the easiest way to install would be to have ubuntu 10.10 iso on a cd,
and install it to my hd, which has been formatted to fat32 ?
that sound about right?

#13 Andrew

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Posted 10 October 2010 - 12:48 AM

FAT32 is a bad idea. I don't even think it'd work. Linux can read and write FAT32, of course, but that filesystem is pretty much the worst one out there.

Ubuntu's default filesystem is EXT4. It's about 1000% better than FAT32 in all respects and I recommend it highly (the installer will format the drive for you)

#14 cobra5000

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Posted 10 October 2010 - 11:04 AM

thanks Andrew,
that would work as i expect to dedicate this ext hd to the task of running linux ,
question: would i still be able to store files from windows in a folder if the hd was formatted to EXT4.
or could there be a partition of some sort on the external hd for any backup i would want to do as well?

i was downloading the 10.10 version but my dsl connection is a little slow so i went ahead and ordered a copy from them.
they said it may take a few weeks but i am not in any hurry.
i may also have someone i know with a faster connection download and burn to a cd.

thanks.

#15 Andrew

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Posted 10 October 2010 - 06:38 PM

Ubuntu can read and write to all Windows partitions, but Windows can only see it's own. There is a third party tool for Windows that will allow Windows to access EXT3 partitions, but not EXT4 partitions.

So, anything on a connected Windows drive (that is formatted in NTFS or FAT) will be accessible from either OS. Anything on a Linux drive (formatted in anything BUT NTFS or FAT) will be accessible only to Linux without a third part addon for WIndows.




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