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Sick PCs should be banned from the net says Microsoft


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#1 buddy215

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 09:40 AM

Sounds good to me. But reading the article makes one wonder if ever this would be accomplished.
So many naysayers and excuse makers for not cutting off the infected computers. You would think,
especially the Sophos commenter, would consider that this is a solution to killing most of the botnets and other malware.
Instead of looking for reasons for why it won't work, help figure out how to make it work.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11483008
6 October 2010 Last updated at 08:04 ET
Sick PCs should be banned from the net says Microsoft

.....Virus-infected computers that pose a risk to other PCs should be blocked from the net, a senior researcher at software giant Microsoft suggests.........

....."Simply put, we need to improve and maintain the health of consumer devices connected to the internet in order to avoid greater societal risk.".....

....."Commonly available cyber defences such as firewalls, antivirus and automatic updates for security patches can reduce risk, but they're not enough," wrote Mr Charney. "Despite our best efforts, many consumer computers are host to malware or are part of a botnet."

His proposal, presented at the International Security Solutions Europe (ISSE) Conference in Berlin, Germany, is for all computers to have a "health certificate" to prove that it is uninfected before it connects to the net. ..................

................. "There may be some who would say that Microsoft shouldn't be on the internet until they get their own house in order”

End Quote Graham Cluley Sophos ..........
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

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#2 ThunderZ

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 09:53 AM

................. "There may be some who would say that Microsoft shouldn't be on the internet until they get their own house in order”

End Quote Graham Cluley Sophos ..........



In many ways I agree with that. But it also comes down to User education. = Not being click happy. IMO

#3 quietman7

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:14 PM

Using infected computers on the Internet is a security risk to everyone as they are prone to attack from hackers, Botnets, and zombie machines. When there are compromised computers connected to the Internet, malware spreads faster and more extensively, distributed denial-of-service attacks are easier to launch, spammers have more platforms from which to send e-mail and more zombies are created to perpetuate the cycle.
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#4 Romeo29

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 04:27 PM

"Although the conditions to be checked may change over time, current experience suggests that such health checks should ensure that software patches are applied, a firewall is installed and configured correctly, an antivirus program with current signatures is running, and the machine is not currently infected with known malware," he wrote in the accompanying paper.


That would irritate Linux users who think anti-virus is not required for Linux computers as malware rarely or never affects Linux.
If he is only talking about computers running on Microsoft Windows, then many-many users would feel bugged unnecessarily and move onto using Linux or Macintosh.
This can also lead to Microsoft forcing Windows 98/2000/ME/XP users to buy newer versions of Windows as support for older versions is over a long time ago - how can they keep them patched?

#5 thelittleduck

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 04:34 PM

How are people going to be able to do online scans if there computer is banned?

#6 DaChew

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 06:23 PM

ISP's would have to profile and identify infected computers, they do so already with malware sending spam emails. Then the offender has to remove the infection or be disconnected. Sounds fair to me.

The rest seems a little far fetched.

Edited by DaChew, 07 October 2010 - 06:26 PM.

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#7 buddy215

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 08:06 AM

Microsoft's suggestion is gaining endorsements. Fewer naysayers.

This article is of interest. Looks like the US has the largest number of botnet infected computers.
South Korea has the larger percentage of infected computers.
http://www.informationweek.com/news/securi...2010-10-15_html

One commenter on the article, BubbaIT, said this:
..........The point I'm laboring to make is that blaming Microsoft for all the security problems endemic to the internet is foolish. They have their share of blame to bear, sure, but they're also being very proactive in proposing solutions to the problems we're facing. The idea of quarantining infected PCs, if it can be handled correctly, has a lot to recommend it. This sort of thing is already being done on a lot of enterprise networks - NAC, or some other TLA to describe a step of validating that you're healthy before you can connect and access network resources. There's nothing wrong with this idea, and a lot to recommend it.

It's time to grow up and face the reality - as long as something was programmed for beneficial use by a human being, it can be subverted to something more malicious by another human being. And that conflict is not going to end any time soon...........
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#8 buddy215

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Posted 17 October 2010 - 05:09 PM

http://www.wirelessweek.com/News/FeedsAP/2...curity-program/

WASHINGTON — The government is reviewing an Australian program that will allow Internet service providers to alert customers if their computers are taken over by hackers and could limit online access if people don’t fix the problem..............

...........But officials are stopping short of advocating an option in the Australian plan that allows Internet providers to wall off or limit online usage by customers who fail to clean their infected computers, saying this would be technically difficult and likely run into opposition.

"In my view, the United States is probably going to be well behind other nations in stepping into a lot of these new areas," said Prescott Winter, former chief technology officer for the National Security Agency, who is now at the California-based cybersecurity firm, ArcSight.

In the U.S., he said, the Internet is viewed as a technological wild west that should remain unfenced and unfettered. But he said this open range isn't secure, so "we need to take steps to make it safe, reliable and resilient."

"I think that, quite frankly, there will be other governments who will finally say, at least for their parts of the Internet, as the Australians have apparently done, we think we can do better."..................
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”




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