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Win XP Pro BSOD


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#1 mrsawyer

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:15 AM

I have a clone Win XP Pro computer that gives me a BSOD 0x0000007E when attempting to boot. The Windows logo and scrolling bar show up for about 6 seconds, then the BSOD. It has a Sempron CPU, an ECS motherboard, and a Western Digital 120GB HD, and Win XP Pro SP3. Now for how I got to this point...

The computer had a virus. I attached the infected hard drive to a test computer, used Malwarebytes and AVG to remove the virus. After this the system would not boot (not even to safe mode). So, after trying rebuilding the bootcfg and doing a fixmbr from the Win XP Recovery Console (which did no good), I performed an in place upgrade of Win XP to avoid having to reinstall applications. Unthinkingly, I did the in place upgrade using my test computer instead of the one the drive came from. The installation worked and allowed me to boot into the user profiles, but also indicated that I have to activate Windows (which I chose not to do).

At this point, I returned the hard drive to the original computer and got the BSOD. It will boot into safe mode and safe mode with command prompt. When I boot into safe mode with networking, it says that Windows must be activated before anyone can log in and since activation does not run in safe mode, I must restart the computer. in safe mode, I was able to install all the device drivers needed (except the sound driver installation program hung). Successful Driver installattions include: VGA, Chipset, and LAN. I attempted to upgrade the BIOS, but the BIOS file on the motherboard's drivers webpage was not the right file.

I tried disabling all onboard components except the IDE controller. I tried a different video card. I tried different RAM. All to no avail. I tried looking at the bootlog, but it only contained info of the successful boots into safe mode.

I tried running the in place upgrade again, this time on the original machine. The installation ran fine until the system rebooted after copying the Windows XP files from the CD. After the reboot, the BSOD appeared. So Windows could not finish the installation. I tried booting into safe mode at that point, but that failed because Windows cannot install in safe mode. I then put the hard drive back into the test machine, and Windows completed the installation. I put the drive back in the original machine, and now get the BSOD I described in the 1st and 3rd paragraphs above. Any suggestions (other than format and reinstall) ?

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#2 dc3

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:36 AM

Hi mrsawyer, and welcome to BleepingComputer.

When you take a hdd with a Windows OS installed on it that you have been using on one computer and then install it in another computer you are asking for major problems. The excerpt below is from a Intel article which describes in detail what happens. The article also mentions a reference to an article by Microsoft, it can be seen here .

"Moving a hard drive with Windows* 2000 or Windows XP* already installed to a new motherboard without reinstalling the operating system is not recommended.

If a hard drive is moved to a new computer, the registry entries and drivers for the mass storage controller hardware on the new motherboard are not installed in Windows for the new computer and you may not be able to start Windows. This is documented in Microsoft's knowledge base article. This is true even if you move the hard drive to a motherboard with the same chipset, as different hardware revisions can cause this issue as well.

Additionally, moving a hard drive to a new motherboard may not exhibit any errors until you install new IDE drivers. This is because each chipset uses a different Plug-n-Play (PNP) ID to identify it. If you move your motherboard, your registry will have multiple PNP IDs (for the old hardware as well as the new hardware). If there are multiple entries in the registry, Windows cannot determine which hardware to initialize and therefore fails with a STOP error."

Edited by dc3, 06 October 2010 - 12:37 AM.

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#3 mrsawyer

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 01:02 AM

Wow, bad news indeed. Any idea of where in the registry those PNP IDs may be? I've upgraded systems before with new motherboards and "luckily" had not run into this in XP. I do remember, changing motherboards in Win2K was impossible for me. Thanks for the reply.

P.S. I just looked at the Microsoft article. Looks like there is hope after some registry surgery. I'll report here what happened. (still open to other ideas, if any!)

Edited by mrsawyer, 06 October 2010 - 01:12 AM.


#4 dc3

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 01:18 AM

Have you given any thought to wiping the hdd and do a fresh install in the machine it is intended to be used in?

There is another technique that has had some success as well.

Alternatively, the method below can be tried, but I would back up all of your important files to removable media like CDs, DVDs, Flash drives, or a second hdd.

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/moving_xp.html

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#5 mrsawyer

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 10:12 AM

Thanks, I'll take a look at the michaelstevenstech link.

#6 Gabrial

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 02:27 PM

If you get an XP install CD slipstreamed with the SP3 or at least the service pack level you have installed on the machine, then do a repair install, it should detect your hal layer and install the proper hal.dll for your archetecture.

Otherwise there is an extensive process which involves booting from a BartPE disk, checking the registry on the BartPE boot to detect the proper hal configuration, then copying the files to the hard drive by hand.

Edited by Gabrial, 06 October 2010 - 02:29 PM.


#7 mrsawyer

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 10:15 PM

Gabrial - I used a Win XP SP3 sliptreamed CD on my unsuccessful attempts to do a repair install (in-place upgrade). As for your 2nd idea, how would I know what to look for in the registry? I assume you mean copy entries from the BartPE generated registry to the damaged registry, right?

#8 Gabrial

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 10:00 PM

There is a BartPE script named OfflineSysPrep which handles hal layer, ide controller, etc. It's intended use is to prep a XP system for imaging and allowing the image to automatically detect the hal layer, etc. and install the appropriate drivers.

An alternate use would be in changing motherboards. You could OfflineSysPrep the system as if you were going to image it then boot it and allow the system to get the right drivers installed.

A long discussion on it's use is at http://www.911cd.net/forums//index.php?showtopic=19397

#9 dc3

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 11:03 PM

OK, I lost it after the yellow dog took a left a the hollow log...

Could you please break this down in terms that the uninitiated can follow?

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#10 mrsawyer

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 01:57 AM

I downloaded the Sysprep cab file from Microsoft. I opened a cmd window and tried to use extract to get to the files. My system says extract is not an internal or external command. How shall I proceed?

#11 mrsawyer

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 12:55 PM

After a protracted battle to successfully build a working LiveXP CD (kept getting error in txtsetup.sif), I have run the OfflineSysPrep script. There is an option to "reseal". Not sure if I should use it or not. Any ideas on this? I tried not resealing and just rebooting, but that got me no where (still get the BSOD). I'm going to run the OfflineSysPrep again and reseal this time, but I'm basically shooting in the dark now.




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