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Intel i7 vs. Core 2 Quad


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#1 CHansohn

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 08:22 AM

I have been thinking about upgrading my computer, but the one deciding factor right now is this: is there a noticeable performance boost between the i7 running at 2.89 GHz and the core 2 quad running at 2.89 GHz? I was thinking about upgrading to the i7 950 running at 3.02 GHz, but if there isn't much difference between the i7 and core 2 running the same speed then there is no point. I mostly ask because a guy at geek squad (if you can call them geeks) said their is a massive performance boost going to an i7. I'm doubting it but I've been wrong before.

CPU = Intel i7 950
Motherboard = Asus P6X58D
RAM = Corsair XMS3 DDR3 6X 2GB
Power Supply = Corsair AX1200W
Graphics Card = GTX 580 2-way SLI


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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 10:08 AM

Yes, there is a noticeable difference between an i7 and a Core2 at the same speed, with a caveat.

If you game, or encode video, the difference stands out. You will definitely notice it assuming other parts of your system are not bottlenecking performance. For normal everyday apps, I can't tell the difference between junior's E2500 at 3.0 or my i920 at 3.5. Honestly, if I was considering a new build, I would hold off a couple months till the midrange Sandybridge CPUs/H67chipsets hit the market and have been benched.

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#3 RainbowSix

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:45 AM

You can't even use the i7 in the same socket anyway. You would have to change your motherboard which also means you have to re-buy Windows, unless you have a retail copy. At that point, you might as well just wait until your computer is obsolete and then buy a new one.

Edited by RainbowSix, 01 October 2010 - 11:45 AM.

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#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:18 PM

Agreed, you would need to change motherboards which involves pretty much rebuilding the PC. There are differences between the architecture the i7 uses and that which the Core 2's use, mainly with Hyperthreading. However, not all games or applications respond to Hyperthreading very well, those that don't do still perform above Core 2 speeds (With the same clock and cores) but the difference isn't that large. Then, of course, comes the actual cores, not all games scale well with multiple cores, most prefer two with some using four. Many games today are better served with a high performance graphics card with a high-end, but not super high-end, CPU to feed it.

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