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Computer not booting, is it motherboard?


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#1 tooty

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 11:06 PM

Hey gang. I'm having trouble with a new system here.

Just put together a system myself. It's an asus motherboard with AMD phenom II. Over the course of the year, it's been crashing more and more. Sometimes it would freeze when I'm playing starcraft, sometimes it would freeze when I do nothing. Whether I get a BSOD is random. I ran a memory check program and discovered that one of my memory sticks is bad. I replaced them with warranty. However, very soon after I replaced them, my computer started freezing much more frequently, often when I'm not doing anything at all.It would simply freeze without BSOD. I now think that I may have been seeing two 'types' of freezes the entire time; with one type being fixed, revealing the other. It has since progressed to require multiple booting attempts, sometimes freezing before the bios screen comes up.

Now, I can't boot up from it at all. All the fans start running but nothing shows up on the screen. Sometimes the screen won't even come on, the monitor led would just blink. I have, however, been taken to a screen that says something to the effect of 'hardware or software changes may have occurred to your system' and it gives me the option of either restoring my system or running windows normally <== Once, my computer even froze on THAT screen!!

It feels like my motherboard is crapping out on me. How can I get to the root of it?

Edited by tooty, 30 September 2010 - 11:09 PM.


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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 11:31 PM

First, why don't you post your exact system specs, everything from motherboard model to PSU and video card, and we can go from their, there can be several causes from to much strain on the PSU to faulty hardware, and we can help you locate the cause better if we have an idea of what were dealing with.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 MrBruce1959

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 11:47 PM

Along with what The_patriot09 has asked of you.

I want to point out that your problem could be related to the processor over-heating.

You should inspect the processor closely for the following conditions.

:flowers: Look for dust build up in the heat sink fins of your CPU processor. If found, you need to remove this dust, this could be stopping the heat from escaping from the heat sink.
If this condition is found, you need to either remove it using an old toothbrush, or purchase a can of compressed air and blow the embedded dust out of this heat sink and out of the computer case.

:thumbsup: Your heat sink may not be properly positioned on top of the CPU processor's heat spreader, there could be a space micro seconds wide, that is preventing proper heat transfer to take place.
Or the heat sink is not making full contact do to having a cheap inferior heat transfer thermal pad. It is better to use thermal transfer paste, Artic silver 5 thermal compound is the best paste to use for computer processors. It can be purchased on line or at any store that sells computers or computer accessories.

Only a very thin layer of grease should be applied to the thermal heat spreader of the processor, putting too much paste is just as bad as having NO paste at all, so do not over do this procedure.

Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 30 September 2010 - 11:49 PM.

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#4 dc3

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 11:52 PM

Publish a Snapshot using Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.

Use the instructions here.

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#5 tooty

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 12:10 AM

Along with what The_patriot09 has asked of you.

I want to point out that your problem could be related to the processor over-heating.

You should inspect the processor closely for the following conditions.

:trumpet: Look for dust build up in the heat sink fins of your CPU processor. If found, you need to remove this dust, this could be stopping the heat from escaping from the heat sink.
If this condition is found, you need to either remove it using an old toothbrush, or purchase a can of compressed air and blow the embedded dust out of this heat sink and out of the computer case.

:thumbsup: Your heat sink may not be properly positioned on top of the CPU processor's heat spreader, there could be a space micro seconds wide, that is preventing proper heat transfer to take place.
Or the heat sink is not making full contact do to having a cheap inferior heat transfer thermal pad. It is better to use thermal transfer paste, Artic silver 5 thermal compound is the best paste to use for computer processors. It can be purchased on line or at any store that sells computers or computer accessories.

Only a very thin layer of grease should be applied to the thermal heat spreader of the processor, putting too much paste is just as bad as having NO paste at all, so do not over do this procedure.

Bruce.


i'll ge those specs soon

it's definitely not dust. the heatsink was mounted by the tech guy at the shop i bought it from. how do I tell by inspection if it's :flowers:?

#6 dc3

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 12:15 AM

If you use the link that I posted in my last post it will provide us with all of your specifications.

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#7 tooty

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 12:22 AM

If you use the link that I posted in my last post it will provide us with all of your specifications.


i can't boot up the system at all. i'm now using my laptop. i will need to dig up my receipt that has all the information you guys need.

#8 MrBruce1959

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 12:36 AM

it's definitely not dust. the heat sink was mounted by the tech guy at the shop i bought it from. how do I tell by inspection if it's :thumbsup:?

It does happen that tech guys do not always pay close attention when they do computer work.

Some may have been hired just do to the fact they passed an A+ certification computer test.

So it is possible something may have been over-looked, or they used the cheap rubber pad instead of the thermal heat transfer sticker, which is also a poor excuse for a thermal transfer medium.

Thermal paste is the best transfer medium there is.

It may be a bit hard to see this, but if you press down lightly on the heat sink/cooling fan assembly, the computer may run longer without a shut down, if this is the case, then you will know the heat sink was not making full contact with the processor.

I would take it you do not know much about computer building, but if you do and you feel confident, you can remove the heat sink and re-attach it and make sure it is properly locked down and level on the heat spreader of the CPU.

Please follow dc3's request when you have time. As a team we will help you through this. :flowers:

Bruce.

Edit: Found a typo weeks later and corrected it.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 10 October 2010 - 07:08 PM.

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#9 tooty

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 12:49 AM

i don't :thumbsup: it was the first time i assembled an entire machine with the exception of the cpu and heatsink. i was very proud of myself until the computer started crashing, at which point i started to feel like a tool.

by some miracle my system booted up again.

here are the specs thanks to dc3 :flowers:

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/DUIFgsoZlYKYdmvE5i1GOcR

i appreciate all the help guys. thanks a lot.

Edited by tooty, 01 October 2010 - 12:49 AM.


#10 dc3

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 01:12 AM

It's curious, Kingston suggests DDR-2, yet Crucial suggests DDR-3.

http://www.ec.kingston.com/ecom/configurat...;submit1=Search

http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.aspx?model=M4A785T-M

The instability is what has me wondering if the is an issue with the RAM.

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#11 MrBruce1959

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 01:15 AM

Speccy shows your CPU tempature to be at 27C, which isn't bad.

The question is how long was the computer running when this crash appears?

You may have a lose connecter somewhere on this motherboard, one that works and then doesn't.

Or there is a setting in your BIOS setup utility which is set wrong.

You can sometimes boot up a computer by entering the BIOS and choosing fail-safe defaults in th BIOS menu.

Also what is the specs on your power supply, the make and model number or the output ratings listed on the PSU's sticker?

Bruce.
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#12 tooty

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 01:20 AM

k i'll check on these tomorrow. i have to study for now.

#13 MrBruce1959

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 02:38 PM

k i'll check on these tomorrow.


Okay I'll keep an eye on this thread. :thumbsup:

Bruce.
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#14 the_patriot11

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:15 AM

it doesnt mention what kind of PSU you have? a faulty or underpowered PSU can cause these symptoms as well.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#15 tooty

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Posted 10 October 2010 - 12:11 PM

finished my exams. Now have time to work on this. I'll get you guys the PSU info soon.

How do I check the PSU outputs? With a multimeter?

Edit:

- My PSU is Corsair cmpsu 400 CX, 400 watts

- The crash occurs randomly. Sometimes right off-the-bat, sometimes after an hour or so

- My CPU after running for 20 minutes now is about 27oC still, so I don't think it's a heating problem.

- GPU is at 45oC after 20 minutes

- I assembled the computer, so I may have easily left a loose connector somewhere. I went in and made sure all cords to the motherboard from the PSU are tight. Now, the computer seems to be running without crashing for much longer (20 minutes and counting). Maybe it's a loose connector then?

- Can I unplug cords from the motherboard here and there to reproduce the crash to confirm our suspicion or would that be harmful to the computer?

Edited by tooty, 10 October 2010 - 06:43 PM.





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