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"stacking" Pages On The Screen.


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#1 pendejo

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 11:50 AM

Since I'm only an occasional computer user, I lack the technical lingo to properly phrase my question (apologies). I'll express it as an example. I'm using Windows XP.

Does it affect the operating system if you (generic) allow "pages" to stack up on your screen? For example, I know some computer users who Google on a Website and will then visit additional Websites without bothering to "clear" them by returning to the Google page and search engine. They simply continue onward, visiting additional sites and seemingly allowing all the new pages to accumulate and pile up on top of one another. Does this affect the computer, or does it make any difference at all?

I'm still of the "pen and pencil" mentality. It would seem to me that the accumulation of too many pages on the screen from various and multiple locations would be tantamount to piling up material made of sheets of paper -- and might overload something on the computer. For example, when I finish posting this message, instead of clicking the red "X" (close button) at the top right of this screen, I will exit this site by using my browser back-button to click back to Google "frame by frame."

An acquaintance (who doesn't know much about computers, either) told me it's silly and unnecessary to exit a Website like that. He said to just hit the close button and be done with it -- that the written material you see on a computer screen consists of mere electrons and they do not "accumulate." Another person told me that she suspects that the accumulation of too many pages can cause the cursor to become sluggish.

Thanks in advance for any responses and comments.

Curious :thumbsup:

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#2 acklan

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 12:14 PM

Everything that your computer does requires resources,so yes in one respect it can increase the load on it. It depends on your computer. If you are only on the internet and have a modern computer( built within the last few years) it should be no problem. The exception would be one of these entry level computer with minimum ram. If you computer has 256mb of ram or better then I believe you should be fine. I think 512mb of ram would be the optimal amount for the average user. IMHO
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#3 Herk

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 06:32 PM

I agree with everything Acklan said. Have you tried Mozilla Firefox? It greatly simplifies the use of multiple windows by putting them in tabs in the same window. The first thing I usually do when setting up Firefox is to go into tools -> options -> advanced and uncheck the "hide tab bar when only one web site is open, thereby making it easier to right-click and add another tab. This depends on screen space, of course - on a smaller screen you may wish to hide it when not needed.

#4 acklan

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 11:02 PM

Could you describe you system...
CPU
RAM
Hard drive with used/unused spaces
OS ('9x, ME, W2k, XP)
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#5 Rimmer

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 11:28 PM

Just to add my 10cents - I think you are asking two separate questions:

1. If I open lots of screens does it use computer resouces?
Yes it does. Acklan and Herk have already covered that bit. If you try to use too many resources your computer will slow down and may not operate correctly but you're unlikely to damage anything.

2. If I have lots of screens open do I have to shut them one by one?
No, not at all. Your Internet browser is for just that, browsing. The page that you opened ten minutes ago is just a copy of the webpage (as it was then) there is no purpose served by returning to it via your 'back' button to close it. Just hit the red button with the X on it and that's the end of the story.

hth :thumbsup:

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#6 acklan

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Posted 14 November 2005 - 12:08 AM

I started using firefox a couple of weeks ago and am very pleased. While I like both IE and FF I am now using FF solely at home. As tonight I use IE at work.
FF is far quicker and lighter on resources.

Edited by acklan, 14 November 2005 - 12:09 AM.

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