Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Does a hard drive get slower as it gets older?


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Surma

Surma

  • Members
  • 140 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sweden
  • Local time:06:06 AM

Posted 20 September 2010 - 04:02 PM

Someone told me that a good way to further speed up my computer, having taken many steps to backup and remove data, get it malware-free and remove startups and services, would be to simply replace my hard drive with a newer one, as it would apparently get slower as time goes by, no matter how well you maintain it. This one is about seven or eight years old i think. Would this work? I do not need extra space, i simply need more speed.
---My computer---
Manufacturer:HP Pavilion 061 CPU:Intel Pentium 4 640, 3200 MHz (16 x 200) RAM: 1024MB Motherboard:Asus PTGD1-LA Chipset:Intel Grantsdale i915P HDD:Main256GB Ext512GB Video:Radeon X600 Series Internet:DSL 2mb/s OS:Windows XP Home Edition SP3 Firefox+IExplorer AVG Internet Security

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 MrBruce1959

MrBruce1959

    My cat Oreo


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,377 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, Connecticut. in the USA
  • Local time:12:06 AM

Posted 20 September 2010 - 04:50 PM

Hello and welcome to Bleepingcomputer.

Seriously, older hard drives were slower compared to the newer ones.

But one thing that plays a major factor here is how much data is on the drive and how much of the disk it consumes.

Drives are listed by their speed, such as 7200 RPM etc.

The links I am providing below explain how hard drives are written to and read from. But the first link I am providing mentions ways to over come a slow computer problem.

http://www.colby-sawyer.edu/information/te...owcomputer.html

http://www.ntfs.com/hard-disk-basics.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cylinder-head-sector

SSD hard drives are the newer technology available today and are for the most part the fastest ahead of SATA II hard drives.

Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 21 September 2010 - 11:04 AM.

Welcome to Bleeping Computer! :welcome:
New Members: Please click here for the Bleeping Computer Forum Board Rules
 
My Career Involves 37 Years as an Electronics Repair Technician, to Which I am Currently Retired From.

I Am Currently Using Windows 10 Home Edition.

As a Volunteer Staff Member of Bleeping Computer, the Help That I Proudly Provide Here To Our BC Forum Board Membership is Free of Charge. :wink:

#3 Surma

Surma
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 140 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sweden
  • Local time:06:06 AM

Posted 21 September 2010 - 02:04 AM

So, my disc performs read/write operations just as fast today as it did on day one, and it spins just as fast too?
---My computer---
Manufacturer:HP Pavilion 061 CPU:Intel Pentium 4 640, 3200 MHz (16 x 200) RAM: 1024MB Motherboard:Asus PTGD1-LA Chipset:Intel Grantsdale i915P HDD:Main256GB Ext512GB Video:Radeon X600 Series Internet:DSL 2mb/s OS:Windows XP Home Edition SP3 Firefox+IExplorer AVG Internet Security

#4 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,463 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:02:06 PM

Posted 21 September 2010 - 03:21 AM

Unless the drive is developing a fault. If it has a high error rate, this causes a lot of re-reads, giving the effect of slower performance. There are utilities that can read the drive's SMART (Self Monitoring and Reporting Technology) status to see if it is showing elevated error level.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users